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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Lower Extremity Biomechanics In Individuals With And Without Previous Hamstring Injury, Jessica A. Mutchler Jul 2015

Lower Extremity Biomechanics In Individuals With And Without Previous Hamstring Injury, Jessica A. Mutchler

Human Movement Sciences Theses & Dissertations

Primary risk factors for hamstrings strains such as fatigue, previous injury and strength deficits have been identified in the research, yet re-injury rates remain high among the physically active. Sub-acute analysis of the hip, knee and ankle biomechanics following a hamstrings strain have been largely overlooked and may provide additional insight into re-injury risks. It was the aim of this dissertation to explore long-term adaptations in walking and running tasks following a hamstrings strain, and to develop a hip endurance test that could be used in future studies.

Project one used a cross-sectional study with test-retest design to develop and ...


Lower Extremity Neuromechanics During A Forward-Side Jump Following Functional Fatigue In Patients With Ankle Instability, Hyun Kim Jun 2015

Lower Extremity Neuromechanics During A Forward-Side Jump Following Functional Fatigue In Patients With Ankle Instability, Hyun Kim

Theses and Dissertations

Ankle instability (AI) and fatigue impair neuromuscular control as well as dynamic joint stability of the lower extremity. No one has comprehensively examined the effects of AI and fatigue on neuromechanics of the lower extremity during a functional activity. Deficits associated with AI and fatigue could be additive in increasing the risk for injury in patients with AI. PURPOSE: To examine the interaction of AI and fatigue on lower extremity muscle activity, kinematic, and kinetic patterns during a forward-side jump. METHODS: 25 AI (23.3 ± 1.9 yrs, 176.5 ± 10.5 cm, 70.9 ± 11.4 kg), and 25 ...


Investigating Single-Leg Landing Strategies And Movement Control Across Changes In Task Demands, Andrew D. Nordin May 2015

Investigating Single-Leg Landing Strategies And Movement Control Across Changes In Task Demands, Andrew D. Nordin

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Variability is an intrinsic characteristic of human movement, with hypothesized connections to neuromotor functioning and mechanisms of injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in movement variability among kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic (EMG) variables following mechanical task demand manipulations during single-leg drop landings. Biomechanical outcome variables included 3 kinematic (sagittal, hip, knee, and ankle angles), 4 kinetic (sagittal hip, knee, ankle moments and vertical ground reaction force; GRFz), and 5 EMG variables (gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, medial gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles). Mechanical task demands were altered using load and landing height manipulations, computed as ...


Acute Effects Of Dynamic Stretching On Flexibility And Agonist-Antagonist Muscle Activity, Lance T. Beisley Jan 2015

Acute Effects Of Dynamic Stretching On Flexibility And Agonist-Antagonist Muscle Activity, Lance T. Beisley

EWU Masters Thesis Collection

"Flexibility is an important determinant of health and important in sport performance. ADS and SPST are the methods most often used in training flexibility for sport. Although ADS appears to dominate SPST in measures of power and agility, the mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to delineate the effects of ADS on AROM and agonist-antagonist mean and peak EMG. The ADS protocol involved three sets of ten repetitions of leg kicks while in the supine position with the pelvis and contralateral limb fixed in extension. Participants moved the leg at the hip in a kicking motion to ...


Active Versus Passive Control Of Arm Swing: Implication Of The Restriction Of Pelvis Rotation During Human Locomotion, Stephen Paul Canton Jan 2015

Active Versus Passive Control Of Arm Swing: Implication Of The Restriction Of Pelvis Rotation During Human Locomotion, Stephen Paul Canton

LSU Master's Theses

To date, it remains unclear how passive dynamics and active neural control contribute to arm swing during human locomotion. The passive hypothesis attributes arm swing to the passive transfer of energy from the legs to the arms via biomechanical linkages, while the active hypothesis states that arm swing is actively driven by muscles via neural mechanisms. The present study aims to investigate this phenomenon further by disrupting the biomechanical linkages, thereby directly challenging the passive hypothesis. Ten healthy individuals walked on a treadmill with and without an apparatus that constrained pelvis rotation at 3 different speeds (2 mph, 3 mph ...