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Theses/Dissertations

Kinesiology

Western University

Handgrip exercise

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

The Neuroprotective Effects Of Endurance Training On The Aging Brain, Katelyn Norton Aug 2016

The Neuroprotective Effects Of Endurance Training On The Aging Brain, Katelyn Norton

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Dysregulation of autonomic control often develops with advancing age, favoring a chronic state of heightened sympathetic outflow with parasympathetic withdrawal. However, the mechanisms of this age-related autonomic impairment are not known and may relate to alterations in brain structure (e.g. cortical atrophy) and/or altered neural function, particularly in regions related to the cortical autonomic network, namely, the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), insula cortex (IC), and hippocampus (HC). Exercise exerts beneficial effects on brain structure and, in the case of cognition, neurologic function; however, how exercise affects regions of the brain related to autonomic function are not known. This ...


Somatosensory Stimulation Modulates Heart Rate Variability Changes Induced By Isometric Handgrip Exercise, Jacquie Baker Jul 2013

Somatosensory Stimulation Modulates Heart Rate Variability Changes Induced By Isometric Handgrip Exercise, Jacquie Baker

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Functional imaging reveals overlapping forebrain and basal ganglia regions associated with heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) regulation. Somatosensory stimulation (STIM) and isometric handgrip (HG) were used to test the hypotheses that a) STIM would modulate HG-induced changes to HR and HRV, and b) HG+STIM would produce different cortical activation relative to HG alone (n=12). During STIM, high-frequency (HF)-HRV increased (p<0.05), whereas HR did not change. During HG, HF-HRV decreased (p<0.01) while HR increased (p<0.001). HG+STIM reversed the HG-induced change in HF-HRV (p<0.01). However, the HR response to HG remained unaffected. HG increased insular activation, while ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) activity decreased. HG+STIM produced similar vMPFC deactivation. However, insular activation was no longer evident. These data indicate that somatosensory inputs through STIM can modulate HG-induced changes to HF-HRV. Different insular activations during HG versus HG+STIM suggest afferent signals to the insula may inhibit descending motor signals affecting HF-HRV.