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Theses/Dissertations

Food Science

Doctoral Dissertations

Nanoemulsions

Publication Year

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Optimization Of The Fabrication, Stability, And Performance Of Food Grade Nanoemulsions With Low And High Energy Methods, Jennifer Komaiko Mar 2016

Optimization Of The Fabrication, Stability, And Performance Of Food Grade Nanoemulsions With Low And High Energy Methods, Jennifer Komaiko

Doctoral Dissertations

There is interest in the production of emulsions by low-energy methods because no expensive equipment is required thus making emulsion formation inexpensive and simple to implement. The goal of this research is to establish the major factors that affect emulsion formation using low-energy methods and possible applications of the emulsions and nanoemulsions formed by this method. Lastly, the use of natural emulsifiers with low- and high-energy methods was investigated.

Initially, formation of nanoemulsions using isothermal low energy methods was investigated with a model system (hexadecane, Brij 30). Preliminary experiments showed that nanoemulsions could only be formed when the surfactant was ...


Rationalizing Nanoemulsion Formation For Encapsulation, Protection And Delivery Of Bioactive Food Components, Ying Yang Mar 2015

Rationalizing Nanoemulsion Formation For Encapsulation, Protection And Delivery Of Bioactive Food Components, Ying Yang

Doctoral Dissertations

The objective of this thesis was to design and develop novel food-grade nanoemulsion-based delivery systems for the encapsulation, protection and delivery of lipophilic bioactive food components. These delivery systems could be widely applied in aqueous-based fortified food products, such as beverages, salad dressing and yogurt etc.

Both the low- and high-energy methods could be used for fabricating nanoemulsions (r < 100 nm). The microfluidization method could form nanoemulsions at low surfactant-to-oil ratios (SOR < 0.1), but it required the use of high-energy inputs and expensive equipment. On the other hand, the spontaneous emulsification method could also form ultrafine emulsions and moreover it was simple and inexpensive, but it required much higher surfactant-to-oil ratios (SOR > 0.5) for forming nanoemulsions.

Q-Naturale® is a natural food-grade surfactant, which is got from the bark of the Quillaja saponaria Molina tree. By using high pressure homogenization (microfluidization), Q-Naturale® could form relatively small droplets (d < 200 nm) at low surfactant-to-oil ratios (SOR < 0.1), but the droplets were not as small as those produced using Tween 80 under similar conditions (d < 150 nm). The emulsions formed by using Q-Naturale® as the emulsifier were ...