Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

PDF

South Dakota State University

Meat Science

Range improvement

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Mechanical Treatment And Burning For High Quality Range Forage, F.R. Gartner, E.M. White, R.I. Butterfield Jan 1986

Mechanical Treatment And Burning For High Quality Range Forage, F.R. Gartner, E.M. White, R.I. Butterfield

South Dakota Beef Report, 1986

Annual yields of western wheatgrass and total vegetation were increased on a clayey range site following mechanical treatment. More important to the range manager, year t o year variability in forage production was reduced, since soil moisture is stabilized. Yields of Japanese brome, an annual grass, increased from the second through the fourth growing seasons after treatment. Three consecutive years of abundant fall precipitation beginning in 1980 probably triggered seed germination of this invader plant. Prescribed burning of the mechanical range treatments drastically reduced production of Japanese brome and increased forage quality. Both quantity and quality of western wheatgrass increased ...


Pricklypear Cactus Control In Western South Dakota, J.R. Johnson, W.L. Tucker, C.E. Stymiest, E.J. Bowker Jan 1986

Pricklypear Cactus Control In Western South Dakota, J.R. Johnson, W.L. Tucker, C.E. Stymiest, E.J. Bowker

South Dakota Beef Report, 1986

In a range improvement study, both liquid and pelleted forms of Picloram were effective in controlling pricklypear cactus. Higher rates of chemical hastened control and gave more complete control. At lower rates, cactus was recovering in 1985, the fourth year of study, suggesting that higher rates may be most cost effective. In 1983 noncactus vegetation response was minor. In 1984, "all perennial grass" production increased by more than 50% (312 lb/A) at higher rates of Picloram. Shifts in "cool season" and “warm season" grass components were nonsignificant. In 1985, "cool season grass" was not generally affected by treatments, but ...