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Food Science

2010

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Articles 241 - 245 of 245

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Obesity And Food Choices Among Faculty And Staff At A Large Urban University, Marjorie R. Freedman, Rebecca J. Rubinstein Dec 2009

Obesity And Food Choices Among Faculty And Staff At A Large Urban University, Marjorie R. Freedman, Rebecca J. Rubinstein

Marjorie R. Freedman

Objective: In order to address increasing health care costs associated with obesity, this study sought to determine prevalence of overweight and obesity and examine eating behaviors, food choices, health beliefs, and attitudes of university employees. Participants and Methods: An online survey was distributed to > 3,800 faculty and staff at a large public metropolitan university in Winter 2008. Results: Almost half (48%) of 806 respondents were classified as overweight or obese. Compared to those with normal weights, overweight and obese respondents consumed fewer fruits and vegetables (p < .05), were less confident in making healthful food choices (p < .001), and were ...


Effect Of Soybean Fortification On Fermentation Characteristics And Consumer Acceptability Of Hausa Koko, A Ghanaian Fermented Porridge, James Owusu-Kwarteng Dec 2009

Effect Of Soybean Fortification On Fermentation Characteristics And Consumer Acceptability Of Hausa Koko, A Ghanaian Fermented Porridge, James Owusu-Kwarteng

James Owusu-Kwarteng

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the effect of soybean fortification on microbial growth and consumer acceptability of

Hausa koko.

Methodology and results: Hausa koko was prepared from a mixture of soaked millet grains and pre-soaked,

blanched and dehulled soybeans added at 0 to 50 % replacement levels. pH, titritable acidity and microbial

counts were determined before and after the fermentation period using standard methods. The effect of the

added soybean on acceptability was evaluated on a nine point hedonic scale by an untrained panel that is

familiar with Hausa koko. Data were subjected to Analysis of Variance and Tukey testing for the ...


Viscoelastic Properties And Pasting Characteristics Of Fermented Maize: Influence Of The Addition Of Malted Cereals, Dr. Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa (Phd), Randy Adjonu, Justice Asomaning Dec 2009

Viscoelastic Properties And Pasting Characteristics Of Fermented Maize: Influence Of The Addition Of Malted Cereals, Dr. Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa (Phd), Randy Adjonu, Justice Asomaning

Professor Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa

Investigations were conducted on the viscoelastic properties and pasting characteristics of fermented maize with malted cereals and their suitability for infant feeding. A 3x3x2 factorial experimental design with malting time, cereal malt concentration and cereal type was used. Maize, millet, and sorghum malts were added to fermented maize to reducing its bulk density. Samples were analysed for their viscoelastic properties and pasting characteristics using Brabender Viscoamylograph. Sorghum malt in comparison to millet and maize malts was not effective in terms of lowering the hot and cold paste viscosities of the fermented maize. Maize and millet malts liquefied the dough considerably ...


Acidification And Starch Behaviour During Co-Fermentation Of Cassava And Soybean Into Gari., Dr. Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa (Phd), Edem John Kongor, George Annor, Randy Adjonu Dec 2009

Acidification And Starch Behaviour During Co-Fermentation Of Cassava And Soybean Into Gari., Dr. Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa (Phd), Edem John Kongor, George Annor, Randy Adjonu

Professor Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa

Changes in acidification and starch behaviour were investigated during co-fermentation of cassava and soybean into gari, an African fermented product. Non-volatile acidity, pH and starch content were evaluated using standard analytical methods. Starch breakdown and pasting characteristics were also analysed using Brabender Viscoamylograph. Fermentation caused significant variations in the pH, non-volatile acidity and starch concentration. The pH decreased with concomitant increases in non-volatile acidity during co-fermentation of the cassava dough. Soy-fortification upto 20% caused only minimal effects on the pH, titratable acidity and starch content during the fermentation period. Starch content decreased from 69.8%-60.4% within the 48 ...


Response Surface Methodology For Studying The Quality Characteristics Of Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata)-Based Tempeh., George Amponsah Annor, Esther Sakyi-Dawson, Samuel Sefa-Dedeh, Firibu Kwesi Saalia, Dr. Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa (Phd), Kwaku Tano-Debrah, Agnes Simpson Budu Dec 2009

Response Surface Methodology For Studying The Quality Characteristics Of Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata)-Based Tempeh., George Amponsah Annor, Esther Sakyi-Dawson, Samuel Sefa-Dedeh, Firibu Kwesi Saalia, Dr. Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa (Phd), Kwaku Tano-Debrah, Agnes Simpson Budu

Professor Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa

Response surface methodology was used to optimize the processing conditions in the preparation of cowpea tempeh. The independent factors studied were boiling time (varying from 5 to 30 min), incubation time (varying from 12 to 48 h) and incubation temperatures (varying from 25 to 50°C), whereas the dependent factors were protein content, protein solubility, pH, titratable acidity and total color difference (using L, a* and b*). Regression models were generated and adequacy was tested with regression coefficients (R2) and the lack-of-fit tests. Optimum processing conditions were determined by method of superimposition. There was a strong and significant influence (P < 0.01) of the quadratic effect of the incubation time on the protein content of the cowpea tempeh, with similar significance (P < 0.01) noted in protein solubility with increasing boiling time. The optimum processing conditions observed for the preparation of cowpea tempeh were boiling time of about 20 min, incubation time of about 28 h and incubation temperature of about 37°C.