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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Sweetened Beverage Consumption And Its Contributing Factors Among School-Aged Children–A Multilevel Analysis, Meizi He, Leonard Piché, Danielle Battram, Isabelle Giroux, Charlene Beynon, Jacqline Swans, Rohna Hanning Mar 2010

Sweetened Beverage Consumption And Its Contributing Factors Among School-Aged Children–A Multilevel Analysis, Meizi He, Leonard Piché, Danielle Battram, Isabelle Giroux, Charlene Beynon, Jacqline Swans, Rohna Hanning

Leonard Piché

Excessive consumption of sweetened beverages by children and youth has become an issue of great concern among health professionals and health policy makers in the U.S. and Canada. Over-consumption of sweetened beverages can have negative effects on children's nutrient profile and may increase their risk of obesity. Reducing children's sweetened beverage consumption offers an opportunity to decrease unnecessary energy intake and prevent excess weight gain.


Childhood Poverty And Abdominal Obesity In Adulthood: A Systematic Review, David González, Aydin Nazmi, Cesar G. Victoria Jan 2010

Childhood Poverty And Abdominal Obesity In Adulthood: A Systematic Review, David González, Aydin Nazmi, Cesar G. Victoria

Aydin Nazmi

Adverse socioeconomic conditions in childhood can have lasting effects on health, but evidence is lacking from prospective studies concerning the effects of early poverty on abdominal obesity in adulthood. Cross-sectional studies in adults from middle and high-income countries show that current socioeconomic status is inversely related to obesity in women, but the pattern in men is not consistent. A systematic review was undertaken to assess the influence of early socioeconomic status on waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-hip ratio in adulthood. Thirteen relevant articles were located (five cross-sectional and eight cohort), including only one from a middle-income country and the ...


Obesity And Food Choices Among Faculty And Staff At A Large Urban University, Marjorie Freedman, Rebecca Rubinstein Jan 2010

Obesity And Food Choices Among Faculty And Staff At A Large Urban University, Marjorie Freedman, Rebecca Rubinstein

Faculty Publications

Objective: In order to address increasing health care costs associated with obesity, this study sought to determine prevalence of overweight and obesity and examine eating behaviors, food choices, health beliefs, and attitudes of university employees. Participants and Methods: An online survey was distributed to > 3,800 faculty and staff at a large public metropolitan university in Winter 2008. Results: Almost half (48%) of 806 respondents were classified as overweight or obese. Compared to those with normal weights, overweight and obese respondents consumed fewer fruits and vegetables (p < .05), were less confident in making healthful food choices (p < .001), and were more influenced by food choices available in on-campus dining facilities (p < .05). Conclusions: Obesity among university employees warrants attention. Because these employees have less self-efficacy and consume less healthful diets than their normal weight colleagues, universities need to improve on-campus access to healthful foods.


Obesity And Food Choices Among Faculty And Staff At A Large Urban University, Marjorie R. Freedman, Rebecca J. Rubinstein Dec 2009

Obesity And Food Choices Among Faculty And Staff At A Large Urban University, Marjorie R. Freedman, Rebecca J. Rubinstein

Marjorie R. Freedman

Objective: In order to address increasing health care costs associated with obesity, this study sought to determine prevalence of overweight and obesity and examine eating behaviors, food choices, health beliefs, and attitudes of university employees. Participants and Methods: An online survey was distributed to > 3,800 faculty and staff at a large public metropolitan university in Winter 2008. Results: Almost half (48%) of 806 respondents were classified as overweight or obese. Compared to those with normal weights, overweight and obese respondents consumed fewer fruits and vegetables (p < .05), were less confident in making healthful food choices (p < .001), and were ...