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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Improved Control Of Cheese Manufacture Through Continuous Vat Monitoring Of Coagulation Parameters Using The Hot Wire Method, Michael John Lefevre May 1995

Improved Control Of Cheese Manufacture Through Continuous Vat Monitoring Of Coagulation Parameters Using The Hot Wire Method, Michael John Lefevre

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The hot wire method, with pH and temperature sensors, was evaluated to determine its usefulness and application for cheese production automation. Coagulation of milk substrate was measured with the hot wire instrument and by four other methods: Formagraph, Brookfield®, vixcometer, Omnispec™ bioactivity monitor, and Sommer and Matsen rolling bottle method. The hot wire, using the time at maximum slope, detected coagulation before methods that measure resistance to shear, and after methods that measure light reflectance. Coagulation time was not significantly different from the industry standard rolling bottle method used by Sommer and Matsen. the hot wire instrument was also used ...


Effects Of Homogenization And Ultra-High Temperature Processing On The Properties Of Whole Milk Concentrated By A Multiple-Membrane Separation System, Chien-Ti Chang May 1995

Effects Of Homogenization And Ultra-High Temperature Processing On The Properties Of Whole Milk Concentrated By A Multiple-Membrane Separation System, Chien-Ti Chang

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Three different concentrated whole milks (2.5x, 2.75x, and 3.0x) were produced by mixing equal parts of ultrafiltration retentate of whole milk and reverse osmosis retentate of the UF milk permeate. The concentrated whole milks were ultra-high temperature processed by direct steam injection (140.6°C) followed by flash cooling and two-stage homogenization pressures (2500/500 psi, 3500/700 psi, or 4500/900 psi). The milk concentrates were packaged aseptically and stored at room temperature. On the other hand, the milk concentrates produced by the RO single membrane system with the same concentration levels served as the control ...


Effects Of Iron Fortification On Microbiological, Physical, Chemical, And Organoleptic Properties Of Yogurt, Sharareh Hekmat May 1995

Effects Of Iron Fortification On Microbiological, Physical, Chemical, And Organoleptic Properties Of Yogurt, Sharareh Hekmat

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

It has been shown that iron binds strongly to the proteins in milk, and our aim was to determine whether or not this binding was affected by lowering pH in the manufacture of yogurt. Iron-protein complexing was studied using two different techniques. 1) Skim milk was fortified with 10 mg iron/100 ml and the pH of the milk was adjusted to 6.7, 6.2, 5.8, 5.3, 4.5, and 4.0. The milk was fractionated by ultracentrifugation at 52,000 x g for 60 minutes. The pellets and serum were then analyzed for iron, calcium, and ...


The Effect Of Iron Fortification On The Chemical, Physical, And Sensory Properties Of Mozzarella Cheese, Wendy Haws Rice May 1995

The Effect Of Iron Fortification On The Chemical, Physical, And Sensory Properties Of Mozzarella Cheese, Wendy Haws Rice

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Mozzarella cheese was made from milk fortified with iron so that the cheese contained 25 and 50 ppm iron. Iron was added to the milk in three ways: (1) complexed to casein (ferric-casein), (2) complexed to whey protein (ferric-whey protein), and (3) ferric chloride (FeCl3·6H20) added directly to milk. Cheese quality was determined by chemical, physical, and sensory characteristics and compared with a control cheese.

Chemical oxidation, during 28 days storage, was determined by absorbance of malondialdehyde at 535 nm using the thiobarbituric acid assay (TBA). Physical properties were assessed by the Arnott test for melt, helical viscometer for ...


Muscle Fiber Types, Dna:Rna:Protein Ratios, And Measures Of Tenderness In Various Muscles Of Normal And Callipyge Lambs, Owen D. Rice May 1995

Muscle Fiber Types, Dna:Rna:Protein Ratios, And Measures Of Tenderness In Various Muscles Of Normal And Callipyge Lambs, Owen D. Rice

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

An inherited muscle hypertrophy in sheep is caused by the callipyge gene (CLPG) located on ovine chromosome 18. It has been suggested that this gene is a single autosomal dominant gene. Animals expressing the callipyge gene show increased muscling in the pelvic and torso regions of the body and, thus, have been given the phenotype- descriptive name callipyge (from Greek calli-beautiful; pyge-buttocks). In this study 21 wether lambs, the offspring of callipyge rams (genotype CLPG /clpg) and normal Rambouillet ewes (genotype clpg/clpg), were used to determine the difference s in muscle fiber type percentages, composition, and tenderness between normal ...