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Food Science

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Hypericum perforatum

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Characterizing The Metabolic Fingerprint And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Hypericum Gentianoides, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve S. Wurtele Jan 2008

Characterizing The Metabolic Fingerprint And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Hypericum Gentianoides, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve S. Wurtele

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

In this paper we characterize the metabolic fingerprint and first reported anti-inflammatory activity of Hypericum gentianoides. H. gentianoides has a history of medical use by Native Americans, but it has been studied very little for biological activity. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography−electrospray ionization−mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) analyses of a methanol extract show that H. gentianoides contains a family of over nine related compounds that have retention times, mass spectra, and a distinctive UV absorption spectra characteristic of certain acyl-phloroglucinols. These metabolites are abundant relative to other secondary products present in H. gentianoides, accounting for approximately 0.2 ...


Inhibition Of Prostaglandin E2 Production By Anti-Inflammatory Hypericum Perforatum Extracts And Constituents In Raw264.7 Mouse Macrophage Cells, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Matthew L. Hillwig, Avery K.S. Solco, Philip M. Dixon, Kathleen Delate, Patricia A. Murphy, Eve S. Wurtele, Diane F. Birt Jan 2007

Inhibition Of Prostaglandin E2 Production By Anti-Inflammatory Hypericum Perforatum Extracts And Constituents In Raw264.7 Mouse Macrophage Cells, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Matthew L. Hillwig, Avery K.S. Solco, Philip M. Dixon, Kathleen Delate, Patricia A. Murphy, Eve S. Wurtele, Diane F. Birt

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Hypericum perforatum (Hp) is commonly known for its antiviral, antidepressant, and cytotoxic properties, but traditionally Hp was also used to treat inflammation. In this study, the anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity of different Hp extractions and accessions and constituents present within Hp extracts were characterized. In contrast to the antiviral activity of Hp, the anti-inflammatory activity observed with all Hp extracts was light-independent. When pure constituents were tested, the flavonoids, amentoflavone, hyperforin, and light-activated pseudohypericin, displayed anti-inflammatory activity, albeit at concentrations generally higher than the amount present in the Hp extracts. Constituents that were present in the Hp extracts at concentrations ...


Evaluation Of The Light-Sensitive Cytotoxicity Of Hypericum Perforatum Extracts, Fractions, And Pure Compounds, Laura A. Schmitt, Yi Liu, Patricia A. Murphy, Diane F. Birt Jan 2006

Evaluation Of The Light-Sensitive Cytotoxicity Of Hypericum Perforatum Extracts, Fractions, And Pure Compounds, Laura A. Schmitt, Yi Liu, Patricia A. Murphy, Diane F. Birt

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Hypericum perforatum (Hp) is known for possessing antidepressant and antiviral activities. Despite its use as an alternative to conventional antidepressants, the identification of the cytotoxic chemicals derived from this herb is incomplete. In this study, the cytotoxicity of Hp extracts prepared in solvents ranging in polarity, fractions of one extract, and purified compounds were examined in three cell lines. All extracts exhibited significant cytotoxicity; those prepared in ethanol (no hyperforin, 3.6 μM hypericin, and 134.6 μM flavonoids) showed between 7.7 and 77.4% cell survival (p < 0.0001 and 0.01), whereas the chloroform and hexane extracts (hyperforin, hypericin, and flavonoids not detected) showed approximately 9.0 (p < 0.0001) and 4.0% (p < 0.0001) survival. Light-sensitive toxicity was observed primarily with the ethanol extracts sequentially extracted following removal of material extracted in either chloroform or hexane. The absence of light-sensitive toxicity with the Hp extracts suggests that the hypericins were not playing a prominent role in the toxicity of the extracts.