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Food Science

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Extrusion

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Instrumental And Sensory Texture Attributes Of High‐Protein Nutrition Bars Formulated With Extruded Milk Protein Concentrate, Justin C. Banach, Stephanie Clark, Buddhi P. Lamsal May 2016

Instrumental And Sensory Texture Attributes Of High‐Protein Nutrition Bars Formulated With Extruded Milk Protein Concentrate, Justin C. Banach, Stephanie Clark, Buddhi P. Lamsal

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Previous instrumental study of high‐protein nutrition (HPN) bars formulated with extruded milk protein concentrate (MPC) indicated slower hardening compared to bars formulated with unmodified MPC. However, hardness, and its change during storage, insufficiently characterizes HPN bar texture. In this study, MPC80 was extruded at 2 different conditions and model HPN bars were prepared. A trained sensory panel and instrumental techniques were used to measure HPN bar firmness, crumbliness, fracturability, hardness, cohesiveness, and other attributes to characterize texture change during storage. Extrusion modification, storage temperature, and storage time significantly affected the instrumental and sensory panel measured texture attributes. The HPN ...


Microstructural Changes In High‐Protein Nutrition Bars Formulated With Extruded Or Toasted Milk Protein Concentrate, Justin C. Banach, Stephanie Clark, Buddhi P. Lamsal Feb 2016

Microstructural Changes In High‐Protein Nutrition Bars Formulated With Extruded Or Toasted Milk Protein Concentrate, Justin C. Banach, Stephanie Clark, Buddhi P. Lamsal

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Milk protein concentrates with more than 80% protein (that is, MPC80) are underutilized as the primary protein source in high‐protein nutrition bars as they impart crumbliness and cause hardening during storage. High‐protein nutrition bar texture changes are often associated with internal protein aggregations and macronutrient phase separation. These changes were investigated in model high‐protein nutrition bars formulated with MPC80 and physically modified MPC80s. High‐protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80s hardened slower than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80. Extruded MPC80 had reduced free sulfhydryl group exposure, whereas measurable increases were seen in the toasted ...


Effect Of Low-Shear Extrusion On Corn Fermentation And Oil Partition, Hui Wang, Tong Wang, Lawrence A. Johnson Mar 2009

Effect Of Low-Shear Extrusion On Corn Fermentation And Oil Partition, Hui Wang, Tong Wang, Lawrence A. Johnson

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

To study oil distribution in fermentation liquid and solids for the purpose of recovering oil from corn stillage by centrifugation, a low-shear single-screw extruder was used to treat corn for dry-grind ethanol fermentation. Five different treatments for corn were used, and their effects on ethanol fermentation, oil distribution, and oil extractability were studied. Extruded corn with different particles sizes had similar ethanol yields (33% based on corn) because the starch was equally gelatinized by extrusion. Pretreatment with larger particle size before extrusion tended to have higher free oil than pretreatment with smaller particle sizes, but the effect was not dramatic ...


Effect Of The Corn Breaking Method On Oil Distribution Between Stillage Phases Of Dry-Grind Corn Ethanol Production, Hui Wang, Tong Wang, Lawrence A. Johnson, Anthony L. Pometto Iii Nov 2008

Effect Of The Corn Breaking Method On Oil Distribution Between Stillage Phases Of Dry-Grind Corn Ethanol Production, Hui Wang, Tong Wang, Lawrence A. Johnson, Anthony L. Pometto Iii

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

The majority of fuel ethanol in the United States is produced by using the dry-grind corn ethanol process. The corn oil that is contained in the coproduct, distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS), can be recovered for use as a biodiesel feedstock. Oil removal will also improve the feed quality of DDGS. The most economical way to remove oil is considered to be at the centrifugation step for separating thin stillage (liquid) from coarse solids after distilling the ethanol. The more oil there is in the liquid, the more it can be recovered by centrifugation. Therefore, we studied the effects ...