Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Oxidative Stability Of Egg And Soy Lecithin As Affected By Transition Metal Ions And Ph In Emulsion, Guang Wang, Tong Wang Dec 2008

Oxidative Stability Of Egg And Soy Lecithin As Affected By Transition Metal Ions And Ph In Emulsion, Guang Wang, Tong Wang

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Oxidative stability of egg and soy lecithin in emulsion was evaluated with two transition metal ions, cupric and ferric ion, at two concentration levels (50 and 500 μM). The effect of pH on lipid oxidation was also examined under these two concentrations for each ion. Egg lecithin (EL) had similar peroxide value (PV) development pattern as soy lecithin (SL) when treated with cupric ion under both acidic and neutral pH. Acidic pH of 3 accelerated oxidation of both EL and SL, especially under high concentration of copper. When treated with ferric ion, EL oxidized much faster than SL did. EL ...


Effect Of The Corn Breaking Method On Oil Distribution Between Stillage Phases Of Dry-Grind Corn Ethanol Production, Hui Wang, Tong Wang, Lawrence A. Johnson, Anthony L. Pometto Iii Nov 2008

Effect Of The Corn Breaking Method On Oil Distribution Between Stillage Phases Of Dry-Grind Corn Ethanol Production, Hui Wang, Tong Wang, Lawrence A. Johnson, Anthony L. Pometto Iii

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

The majority of fuel ethanol in the United States is produced by using the dry-grind corn ethanol process. The corn oil that is contained in the coproduct, distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS), can be recovered for use as a biodiesel feedstock. Oil removal will also improve the feed quality of DDGS. The most economical way to remove oil is considered to be at the centrifugation step for separating thin stillage (liquid) from coarse solids after distilling the ethanol. The more oil there is in the liquid, the more it can be recovered by centrifugation. Therefore, we studied the effects ...


Impact Of Dry Solids And Bile Acid Concentrations On Bile Acid Binding Capacity Of Extruded Oat Cereals, Ni Yao, Pamela J. White, Jean-Luc Jannink, Salid Alavi Sep 2008

Impact Of Dry Solids And Bile Acid Concentrations On Bile Acid Binding Capacity Of Extruded Oat Cereals, Ni Yao, Pamela J. White, Jean-Luc Jannink, Salid Alavi

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Extruded breakfast cereals (EBC), processed from two oat lines, N979-5-2-4 (N979) and “Jim”, with β-glucan concentrations of 8.7 and 4.9%, respectively, were used to determine the impact of dry solids (DS) and bile acid (BA) concentrations on in vitro BA binding efficiency. A full fractional factorial design with levels for BA concentrations of 0.20, 0.47, 0.95, 2.37, and 4.73 μmol/g of total EBC slurry and for DS in the slurries of 0.8, 2, 3, and 4% (w/w) was selected. The absolute amount of BA bound (μmol) was measured for each ...


Improving Digestibility Of Soy Flour By Reducing Disulfide Bonds With Thioredoxin, Richard J. Faris, Hui Wang, Tong Wang Aug 2008

Improving Digestibility Of Soy Flour By Reducing Disulfide Bonds With Thioredoxin, Richard J. Faris, Hui Wang, Tong Wang

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

The Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) and the Bowman−Birk inhibitor (BBI) of trypsin and chymotrypsin contain disulfide bonds. Glycinin, the major storage protein in soybeans also contains disulfide bonds. Treatment of soy white flour with a NADP−thioredoxin system (NTS) effectively reduced disulfide bonds in soy flour and increased protein digestibility by trypsin and pancreatin as measured by the pH stat method. Treatment of soy flour with NTS increased the digestibility compared to soy white flour by 29.3 and 60.6% for trypsin and pancreatin, respectively. NTS-treated soy flour had similar digestibility by trypsin to autoclaved soy flour and ...


Value-Added Products From Extruding-Expelling Of Soybeans, Tong Wang, Lawrence A. Johnson, Deland J. Myers Jan 2008

Value-Added Products From Extruding-Expelling Of Soybeans, Tong Wang, Lawrence A. Johnson, Deland J. Myers

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Increasingly, extruding-expelling (E-E) plants, often referred as “mini-mills,” are being constructed by farmer-owned businesses to process soybeans produced in local areas. E-E processing is a mechanical process that has several advantages over conventional processing methods. E-E mills, most employing the Express System® (Insta-Pro Div., Triple “F”, Inc., Des Moines, IA), are relatively small, with capacities ranging from 6 to 120 tons/day. They have low initial capital investment ($150,000–200,000) and relatively low operating costs ($25/ton) (1). E-E mills are especially well suited for processing identity-preserved (IP) soybeans. The largescale solvent extraction (SE) facilities, which have typical ...


Characterizing The Metabolic Fingerprint And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Hypericum Gentianoides, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve S. Wurtele Jan 2008

Characterizing The Metabolic Fingerprint And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Hypericum Gentianoides, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve S. Wurtele

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

In this paper we characterize the metabolic fingerprint and first reported anti-inflammatory activity of Hypericum gentianoides. H. gentianoides has a history of medical use by Native Americans, but it has been studied very little for biological activity. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography−electrospray ionization−mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) analyses of a methanol extract show that H. gentianoides contains a family of over nine related compounds that have retention times, mass spectra, and a distinctive UV absorption spectra characteristic of certain acyl-phloroglucinols. These metabolites are abundant relative to other secondary products present in H. gentianoides, accounting for approximately 0.2 ...


Emerging Soy Protein Processing Technologies, Tong Wang Jan 2008

Emerging Soy Protein Processing Technologies, Tong Wang

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

In a study of refunctionalizing EE protein meals, Wang and colleagues (2004) applied HTC with steam (~150°C) and high shear to two slurries of heat-denatured protein having protein dispersibility indices (PDI) of 35 and 60, along with solvent-extracted white flakes and full-fat whole soy meal as controls. OTHER EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES Some of the new developments in soy protein processing include (i) producing a protein with health benefits by incorporating phytochemicals such as plant sterols and isoflavones for reducing blood total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterols, (ii) hydrolyzing soy proteins to produce peptides with cholesterol-reducing, free-radical scavenging, and antioxidant effects, and ...


Methods For Whole Cell Detection Of Microorganisms, Byron F. Brehm-Stecher Jan 2008

Methods For Whole Cell Detection Of Microorganisms, Byron F. Brehm-Stecher

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Microbes are ubiquitous, and can be found occupying nearly every imaginable niche on Earth. These include organic and inorganic surfaces, interfacial boundaries and within macroscopically solid matrices, such as the pore space of rocks. Because phylogenetically divergent microbes may be visually indistinguishable, understanding the species distribution and ecological significance of environmental microbes requires diagnostic tools that extend beyond simple phenotypic description. Methods for microbial diagnostics can be divided into two broad categories: cellular and acellular. Acellular techniques, such as the polymerase chain reaction or certain immunoassay formats may be effective at detecting molecular, structural or biochemical targets associated with specific ...


Minor Constituents And Phytochemicals Of Soybeans, Tong Wang Jan 2008

Minor Constituents And Phytochemicals Of Soybeans, Tong Wang

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Soybeans are recognized as a storehouse of nutrients. The focus of this chapter is on composition of minor compounds or phytochemicals (Table 10.1), while the major components of the seeds (i.e., proteins and oil) are discussed in other chapters of this book.