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Food Science

University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Antimicrobials

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Combinations Of Multiple Natural Antimicrobials With Different Mechanisms As An Approach To Control Listeria Monocytogenes, Savannah Grace Hawkins Aug 2016

Combinations Of Multiple Natural Antimicrobials With Different Mechanisms As An Approach To Control Listeria Monocytogenes, Savannah Grace Hawkins

Masters Theses

To improve food safety and shelflife requires the use of preservation processes, such as physical (heat, refrigeration) or chemical (antimicrobial addition) processes. Regulatory approved synthetic food antimicrobials (preservatives) have some uses but are very limited in their spectrum of activity. Thus, alternatives are needed to conventional chemical antimicrobials. One method is to use naturally occurring antimicrobials, especially those found in spices and herbs, essential oils (EO) and essential oil components (EOC). EOs have been shown to have antimicrobial activity but the activity is highly variable. Finding a combination of EOs, EOCs, or other natural antimicrobials that act synergistically would allow ...


Sanitization Effectiveness Of Alkaline-Dissolved Essential Oils As Organic Produce Washing Solutions, Marion Lewis Harness Iii May 2015

Sanitization Effectiveness Of Alkaline-Dissolved Essential Oils As Organic Produce Washing Solutions, Marion Lewis Harness Iii

Masters Theses

Produce is often rinsed immediately post-harvest to remove dirt and debris. Rinse water can be a point of cross-contamination if no antimicrobials are present. While plant essential oils (EOs) are recognized as antimicrobials, their hydrophobicity makes them difficult to implement in rinsing solutions. In this study, the efficacy of emulsified EOs were examined against Salmonella on the surface of cherry tomatoes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the surface of baby spinach. Contaminated produce samples were rinsed in an emulsions of clove bud oil or thyme oil at 0.2 and 0.5% (v/v), as well as free chlorine ...