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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Crop Decision-Making To Protect Soil And Water, David J. Muth Aug 2014

Crop Decision-Making To Protect Soil And Water, David J. Muth

David J. Muth

David Muth, a founding partner and senior vice president for analytics at AgSolver Inc., discusses crop decision making in the context of soil and water protection.


Forest Biomass Supply Chains In Ireland: A Life Cycle Assessment Of Ghg Emissions And Primary Energy Balances, Fionnuala Murphy Jan 2014

Forest Biomass Supply Chains In Ireland: A Life Cycle Assessment Of Ghg Emissions And Primary Energy Balances, Fionnuala Murphy

Fionnuala Murphy

The demand for wood for energy production in Ireland is predicted to double from 1.5 million m3 over bark (OB) in 2011 to 3 million m3 OB by 2020. There is a large potential for additional biomass recovery for energetic purposes from both thinning forest stands and by harvesting of tops and branches, and stumps. This study builds on research within the wood-for-energy concept in Ireland by analysing the energy requirements and greenhouse gas emissions associated with thinning, residue bundling and stump removal for energy purposes. To date there have been no studies on harvesting of residues and stumps ...


Opportunities For Energy Crop Production Based On Subfield Scale Distribution Of Profitability, Ian J. Bonner, Kara G. Cafferty, David J. Muth, Mark D. Tomer, David E. James, Sarah A. Porter, Douglas L. Karlen Jan 2014

Opportunities For Energy Crop Production Based On Subfield Scale Distribution Of Profitability, Ian J. Bonner, Kara G. Cafferty, David J. Muth, Mark D. Tomer, David E. James, Sarah A. Porter, Douglas L. Karlen

David J. Muth

Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while benefiting soil and water quality and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits, energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study for Hardin County, Iowa, to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. Estimates of variability in row crop production at a subfield level are used to model the economic performance of corn (Zea mays L ...


Opportunities For Energy Crop Production Based On Subfield Scale Distribution Of Profitability, Ian J. Bonner, Kara G. Cafferty, David J. Muth, Mark D. Tomer, David E. James, Sarah A. Porter, Douglas L. Karlen Dec 2013

Opportunities For Energy Crop Production Based On Subfield Scale Distribution Of Profitability, Ian J. Bonner, Kara G. Cafferty, David J. Muth, Mark D. Tomer, David E. James, Sarah A. Porter, Douglas L. Karlen

Douglas L Karlen

Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while benefiting soil and water quality and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits, energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study for Hardin County, Iowa, to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. Estimates of variability in row crop production at a subfield level are used to model the economic performance of corn (Zea mays L ...


Grain Drying Systems, Kasiviswanathan Muthukumarappan, Poonam Singha Dec 2013

Grain Drying Systems, Kasiviswanathan Muthukumarappan, Poonam Singha

POONAM SINGHA

Grain drying begins in the field after the grain is fully mature. The primary objective of grain drying and storage is to manage the temperature and moisture of the air around the grain to minimize grain quality and market value losses while holding the grain for better market opportunities. Maintaining grain quality requires drying the grain to safe moisture content levels after harvest followed by lowering and maintaining the grain temperature within a few degrees of ambient air temperatures. Natural drying exposes the wet grains to sun and wind. Artificial dryers employ high temperature directly or indirectly in both natural ...