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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Sheep Blowflies Strike Out!, David Cook, Ian Dadour, Ernie Steiner Jan 1996

Sheep Blowflies Strike Out!, David Cook, Ian Dadour, Ernie Steiner

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Woolgrowers are constantly concerned that the sheep blowfly may be able to breed in sheep or other animal carcasses. David Cook, Ian Dadour and Ernis Steiner report on an experiment that answers that question once and for all.


Survey Of Parasite Control Practices In Sheep And Cattle, J R. Edwards, R V R Gwynn, R A. Love, Richard Thomas Norris, G Dalton-Morgan, Brown Besier Apr 1986

Survey Of Parasite Control Practices In Sheep And Cattle, J R. Edwards, R V R Gwynn, R A. Love, Richard Thomas Norris, G Dalton-Morgan, Brown Besier

Technical Bulletins

Farms in the Albany, Esperance, Jerramungup and Katanning districts were surveyed to determine parasite control strategies currently used, to evaluate the adoption of recommended control practices and to detect areas of ineffective parasite control. For cattle, the number of drenches given in the low rainfall zone was higher than the number given in the high rainfall zone.


'Dermo' Fleece Rot And Body Strike On Sheep, S G. Gherardi, S. S. Sutherland, N. Monzu Jan 1985

'Dermo' Fleece Rot And Body Strike On Sheep, S G. Gherardi, S. S. Sutherland, N. Monzu

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Blowfly strike is one of the major problems confronting the sheep industry in Austrsalia, with an estimated totsalcost of control eceeding $100 million each year.

Sheep are susceptible to five types of strike: body, breach, poll, pizzle and wound. Body strike, is of greater economic importance because its sporadic occurence from year to year makes it difficult to predict and cintrol. Outbreaks of body strike after rain can affect large numbers of sheep and inflict severe production losses.

In eastern Australia fleece rot is generally considered to be the main predisposing factor to blowfly strike, but in Western Australia evidence ...


Some Basic Facts About Primary Blowflies, N Monzu Jan 1978

Some Basic Facts About Primary Blowflies, N Monzu

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Research has begun on blowfly species attacking sheep in Western Australia. Already this research has indicated the importance of a species in Western Australia which is not a problem in the Eastern States.

Future management of sheep flocks to minimise fly strike may require recognition of the differences between blowfly species. This article gives a description of the primary species - those which can initiate strikes.


How To Control Flystrike In Sheep, H E. Fels Jan 1971

How To Control Flystrike In Sheep, H E. Fels

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

FLYSTRIKE affects incomes and efficiency because a large part of the work done on sheep farms is to prevent or treat it, and because it kills sheep and reduces the amount and quality of production.


Flystrike Control Methods, H E. Fels Jan 1971

Flystrike Control Methods, H E. Fels

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

A short article outlining methods to control flystrike.


Flystrike Control Programmes, H E. Fels Jan 1971

Flystrike Control Programmes, H E. Fels

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

THE various flystrike control methods all avoid susceptible patches of skin on the sheep.

To avoid work—

• choose methods that give the most control for the least effort, and

• combine these methods into a system that works well.


Mulesing And Tailstripping : For The Prevention Of Fly-Strike, W L. Mcgarry Jan 1962

Mulesing And Tailstripping : For The Prevention Of Fly-Strike, W L. Mcgarry

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

MULESING and tailstripping are basic to fly strike control.

During emergencies and bad fly waves they may need to be supplemented by temporary protective measures such as jetting and crutching.


Mycotic Dermatitis (Lumpy Wool) And Fleece Rot Of Sheep, J Shilkin Jan 1962

Mycotic Dermatitis (Lumpy Wool) And Fleece Rot Of Sheep, J Shilkin

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Matted and sometimes discoloured specimens of wool are often received at the Department of Agriculture during seasons of heavy rainfall.

Two similar but quite distinct diseases are recognised as having caused this condition.

They are mycotic dermatitis (lumpy wool) and fleece rot. Both conditions damage the fleece and render affected sheep susceptible to blowfly strike.