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Other

2014

Anthropogenic development; antipredation strategy; Centrocercus urophasianus; Greater Sage-Grouse; habitat; parental investment; survival

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus Urophasianus) Hen Survival: Effects Of Raptors, Anthropogenic And Landscape Features, And Hen Behavior, Jonathan B. Dinkins, Michael R. Conover, Christopher P. Kirol, Jeffrey L. Beck, S. Nicole Frey Feb 2014

Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus Urophasianus) Hen Survival: Effects Of Raptors, Anthropogenic And Landscape Features, And Hen Behavior, Jonathan B. Dinkins, Michael R. Conover, Christopher P. Kirol, Jeffrey L. Beck, S. Nicole Frey

Wildland Resources Faculty Publications

Survival of breeding-age hens has been identified as the demographic rate with the greatest potential to influence population growth of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte, 1827); hereafter “Sage-Grouse”). During 2008–2011, we collected summer survival data from 427 Sage-Grouse hens in southern Wyoming, USA. We assessed the effects of raptor densities, anthropogenic features, landscape features, and Sage-Grouse hen behavior on Sage-Grouse hen survival. Survival of Sage-Grouse hens was positively associated with the proportion of big sagebrush (genus Artemisia L.) habitat within 0.27 km radius and road density and negatively associated with power-line density, proximity to forested habitat, and topographic ...