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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Non-Native Ant Invader Displaces Native Ants But Facilitates Non-Predatory Invertebrates, Robert Warren, Madeson C. Goodman Jan 2019

Non-Native Ant Invader Displaces Native Ants But Facilitates Non-Predatory Invertebrates, Robert Warren, Madeson C. Goodman

Biology Faculty Datasets

Many invasive ants, such as the European fire ant (Myrmica rubra), are particularly successful invaders due to their ability to form multi-nest, multi-queen 'supercolonies' that appear to displace native invertebrates in invaded regions. Myrmica rubra has invaded many areas in the Northeastern United States, including Western New York. Myrmica rubra invasion corresponds with decreases in native invertebrates, particularly ants, an effect which may be attributable to direct displacement, or because M. rubra prefers habitat unsuitable for native ants. We surveyed Western New York parklands to investigate native ant and non-ant invertebrate abundance in M. rubra-invaded and uninvaded areas. We ...


Do Novel Weapons That Degrade Mycorrhizal Mutualisms Promote Species Invasion?, Robert Warren, Phil Pinzone, Daniel L. Potts, Gary Pettibone Jan 2018

Do Novel Weapons That Degrade Mycorrhizal Mutualisms Promote Species Invasion?, Robert Warren, Phil Pinzone, Daniel L. Potts, Gary Pettibone

Biology Faculty Datasets

Non-native plants often dominate novel habitats where they did not co-evolve with the local species. The novel weapons hypothesis suggests that non-native plants bring competitive traits against which native species have not adapted defenses. Novel weapons may directly affect plant competitors by inhibiting germination or growth, or indirectly by attacking competitor plant mutualists (degraded mutualisms hypothesis). Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) and European buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) are widespread plant invaders that produce potent secondary compounds that negatively impact plant competitors. We tested whether their impacts were consistent with a direct effect on the tree seedlings (novel weapons) or an indirect attack ...


A Systematic Review Of Context Bias In Invasion Biology, Robert Warren Jan 2017

A Systematic Review Of Context Bias In Invasion Biology, Robert Warren

Biology Faculty Datasets

The language that scientists use to frame biological invasions may reveal inherent bias - including how data are interpreted. A frequent critique of invasion biology is the use of value-laden language that may indicate context bias. Here we use a systematic study of language and interpretation in papers drawn from invasion biology to evaluate whether there is a link between the framing of papers and the interpretation of results. We also examine any trends in context bias in biological invasion research. We examined 651 peer-reviewed invasive species competition studies and implemented a rigorous systematic review to examine bias in the presentation ...


Nest-Mediated Seed Dispersal, Robert Warren Jan 2017

Nest-Mediated Seed Dispersal, Robert Warren

Biology Faculty Datasets

Many plant seeds travel on the wind and through animal ingestion or adhesion; however, an overlooked dispersal mode may lurk within those dispersal modes. Viable seeds may remain attached or embedded within materials birds gather for nest building. Our objective was to determine if birds inadvertently transport seeds when they forage for plant materials to build, insulate and line nests. We also hypothesized that nest-mediated dispersal might be particularly useful for plants that use mating systems with self-fertilized seeds embedded in their stems. We gathered bird nests in temperate forests and fields in eastern North America and germinated the plant ...