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State University of New York College at Buffalo - Buffalo State College

2018

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Do Novel Weapons That Degrade Mycorrhizal Mutualisms Promote Species Invasion?, Robert Warren, Phil Pinzone, Daniel L. Potts, Gary Pettibone Jan 2018

Do Novel Weapons That Degrade Mycorrhizal Mutualisms Promote Species Invasion?, Robert Warren, Phil Pinzone, Daniel L. Potts, Gary Pettibone

Biology Faculty Datasets

Non-native plants often dominate novel habitats where they did not co-evolve with the local species. The novel weapons hypothesis suggests that non-native plants bring competitive traits against which native species have not adapted defenses. Novel weapons may directly affect plant competitors by inhibiting germination or growth, or indirectly by attacking competitor plant mutualists (degraded mutualisms hypothesis). Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) and European buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) are widespread plant invaders that produce potent secondary compounds that negatively impact plant competitors. We tested whether their impacts were consistent with a direct effect on the tree seedlings (novel weapons) or an indirect attack ...