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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Is There A Link Between Aging And Microbiome Diversity In Exceptional Mammalian Longevity?, Graham M. Hughes, John Leech, Sebastien J. Puechmaille, Jose V. Lopez, Emma C. Teeling May 2018

Is There A Link Between Aging And Microbiome Diversity In Exceptional Mammalian Longevity?, Graham M. Hughes, John Leech, Sebastien J. Puechmaille, Jose V. Lopez, Emma C. Teeling

Jose V. Lopez

A changing microbiome has been linked to biological aging in mice and humans, suggesting a possible role of gut flora in pathogenic aging phenotypes. Many bat species have exceptional longevity given their body size and some can live up to ten times longer than expected with little signs of aging. This study explores the anal microbiome of the exceptionally long-lived Myotis myotis bat, investigating bacterial composition in both adult and juvenile bats to determine if the microbiome changes with age in a wild, long-lived non-model organism, using non-lethal sampling. The anal microbiome was sequenced using metabarcoding in more than 50 ...


Is There A Link Between Aging And Microbiome Diversity In Exceptional Mammalian Longevity?, Graham M. Hughes, John Leech, Sebastien J. Puechmaille, Jose V. Lopez, Emma C. Teeling Jan 2018

Is There A Link Between Aging And Microbiome Diversity In Exceptional Mammalian Longevity?, Graham M. Hughes, John Leech, Sebastien J. Puechmaille, Jose V. Lopez, Emma C. Teeling

Biology Faculty Articles

A changing microbiome has been linked to biological aging in mice and humans, suggesting a possible role of gut flora in pathogenic aging phenotypes. Many bat species have exceptional longevity given their body size and some can live up to ten times longer than expected with little signs of aging. This study explores the anal microbiome of the exceptionally long-lived Myotis myotis bat, investigating bacterial composition in both adult and juvenile bats to determine if the microbiome changes with age in a wild, long-lived non-model organism, using non-lethal sampling. The anal microbiome was sequenced using metabarcoding in more than 50 ...


Reproductive Competency And Mitochondrial Variation In Aged Syrian Hamster Oocytes, Fang Li, Frank J. Castora, Wentia Ford, Khalid Alarid, Howard W. Jones Jr., R. James Swanson Jan 2017

Reproductive Competency And Mitochondrial Variation In Aged Syrian Hamster Oocytes, Fang Li, Frank J. Castora, Wentia Ford, Khalid Alarid, Howard W. Jones Jr., R. James Swanson

Biological Sciences Faculty Publications

The hamster is a useful model of human reproductive biology because its oocytes are similar to those in humans in terms of size and structural stability. In the present study we evaluated fecundity rate, ovarian follicular numbers, ova production, mitochondrial number, structure and function, and cytoplasmic lamellae (CL) in young (2–4 months) and old (12–18 months) Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Young hamsters had higher fertilisation rates and larger litters than old hamsters (100 vs 50% and 9.3 +/- 0.6 vs 5.5 +/- 0.6, respectively). Ovarian tissue from superovulated animals showed a 46% decrease in preantral follicles ...


Decades Of Field Data Reveal That Turtles Senesce In The Wild, Daniel A. Warner, David A. W. Miller, Anne M. Bronikowski, Fredric J. Janzen Jan 2016

Decades Of Field Data Reveal That Turtles Senesce In The Wild, Daniel A. Warner, David A. W. Miller, Anne M. Bronikowski, Fredric J. Janzen

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Lifespan and aging rates vary considerably across taxa; thus, understanding the factors that lead to this variation is a primary goal in biology and has ramifications for understanding constraints and flexibility in human aging. Theory predicts that senescence—declining reproduction and increasing mortality with advancing age—evolves when selection against harmful mutations is weaker at old ages relative to young ages or when selection favors pleiotropic alleles with beneficial effects early in life despite late-life costs. However, in many long-lived ectotherms, selection is expected to remain strong at old ages because reproductive output typically increases with age, which may lead ...


Diet Alters Delayed Selfing, Inbreeding Depression, And Reproductive Senescence In A Freshwater Snail, Josh R. Auld, John F. Henkel Jul 2014

Diet Alters Delayed Selfing, Inbreeding Depression, And Reproductive Senescence In A Freshwater Snail, Josh R. Auld, John F. Henkel

Biology Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Testing The ‘Free Radical Theory Of Aging’ Hypothesis: Physiological Differences In Long-Lived And Short-Lived Colubrid Snakes, Kylie A. Robert, Anja Brunet-Rossinni, Anne M. Bronikowski Jun 2007

Testing The ‘Free Radical Theory Of Aging’ Hypothesis: Physiological Differences In Long-Lived And Short-Lived Colubrid Snakes, Kylie A. Robert, Anja Brunet-Rossinni, Anne M. Bronikowski

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

We test the ‘free radical theory of aging’ using six species of colubrid snakes (numerous, widely distributed, non-venomous snakes of the family Colubridae) that exhibit long (> 15 years) or short (< 10 years) lifespans. Because the ‘rate of living theory’ predicts metabolic rates to be correlated with rates of aging and oxidative damage results from normal metabolic processes we sought to answer whether physiological parameters and locomotor performance (which is a good predictor of survival in juvenile snakes) mirrored the evolution of lifespans in these colubrid snakes. We measured whole animal metabolic rate (oxygen consumption ), locomotor performance, cellular metabolic rate (mitochondrial oxygen consumption), and oxidative stress potential (hydrogen peroxide production by mitochondria). Longer-lived colubrid snakes have greater locomotor performance and reduced hydrogen peroxide production than short-lived species, while whole animal metabolic rates and mitochondrial efficiency did not differ with lifespan. We present the first measures testing the ‘free radical theory of aging’ using reptilian species as model organisms. Using reptiles with different lifespans as model organisms should provide greater insight into mechanisms of aging.


Telomere Shortening In A Long-Lived Marine Bird: Cross-Sectional Analysis And Test Of An Aging Tool, Frans A. Juola, Mark F. Haussmann, Donald C. Dearborn, Carol M. Vleck Jul 2006

Telomere Shortening In A Long-Lived Marine Bird: Cross-Sectional Analysis And Test Of An Aging Tool, Frans A. Juola, Mark F. Haussmann, Donald C. Dearborn, Carol M. Vleck

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

A correlation between length of telomere restriction fragments (TRFs) and age has recently been demonstrated in several bird species. Comparisons of different-aged individuals within a population have shown that TRFs typically shorten with age and that this shortening continues throughout the life span of the species. In addition, it has been shown that telomere rate-of-change (TROC) correlates tightly with life span across several bird species. Previous studies of long-lived birds, however, have shown exceptions to these trends, demonstrating no declines in TRF length in adults in some cases and increases in TRF length with age in other cases. Here, we ...