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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Population Of Northern Leopard Frogs (Rana Pipiens) Migrating Between The Ney Frog Pond And The Minnesota River Valley For Spring Breeding, Rebecca Madison Pollack Aug 2014

Population Of Northern Leopard Frogs (Rana Pipiens) Migrating Between The Ney Frog Pond And The Minnesota River Valley For Spring Breeding, Rebecca Madison Pollack

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

The Northern Leopard Frogs (Rana pipiens) found at the Ney Nature Center (NNC) are particularly important to the NNC, as they are the initial population of frogs found deformed in 1995. As bio-indicators, frog populations can be used to assess the health of their surrounding environment. This study used standard herpetological field methods to gain a population estimate of Northern Leopard Frogs and the migration route used by these frogs as they moved up the bluffs of the Minnesota River Valley from their wintering site to the Ney Frog Pond for spring breeding. The results gathered provide the Ney Environmental ...


First Report Of Satellite Males During Breeding In Leptodactylus Latrans (Amphibia, Anura), Gabriel Laufer, Noelia Gobel, José M. Mautone, María Galán, Rafael O. De Sá Jan 2014

First Report Of Satellite Males During Breeding In Leptodactylus Latrans (Amphibia, Anura), Gabriel Laufer, Noelia Gobel, José M. Mautone, María Galán, Rafael O. De Sá

Biology Faculty Publications

Individual males can adopt alternative mating tactics. The occurrence of satellite males is a common behaviour across anuran taxa (e.g., Lithobates clamitans, Wells, 1977; Anaxyrus cognatus, Krupa, 1989; Dendropsophus ebraccatus, Miyamoto and Cane, 1980; Rhinella crucifer, Forester and Lynken, 1986). Satellite males take peripheral positions to calling males, and adopt alternate mating tactics in an attempt to intercept females that are attracted to calling males (Wells, 2007) to increase their own mating success. Satellite males could have an inexpensive form of mate-locating, avoiding predators, and saving energy (Arak, 1983). Furthermore, this strategy could play an important role in the ...