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Zoology

2014

Brigham Young University

Articles 1 - 30 of 45

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Demographic Monitoring And Population Viability Analysis Of Two Rare Beardtongues From The Uinta Basin, Rebecca M. Mccaffery, Rita Reisor, Kathryn Irvine, Jessi Brunson Nov 2014

Demographic Monitoring And Population Viability Analysis Of Two Rare Beardtongues From The Uinta Basin, Rebecca M. Mccaffery, Rita Reisor, Kathryn Irvine, Jessi Brunson

Western North American Naturalist

Energy development, in combination with other environmental stressors, poses a persistent threat to rare species endemic to the energy-producing regions of the Western United States. Demographic analyses of monitored populations can provide key information on the natural dynamics of threatened plant and animal populations, and how they might be affected by ongoing and future development. In the Uinta Basin in Utah and Colorado, Graham’s beardtongue (Penstemon grahamii) and White River beardtongue (Penstemon scariosus var. albifluvis) are two rare endemic wildflowers that persist on oil shale habitats heavily impacted by current energy exploration and development, and slated for expanded traditional ...


Estimating The Ages Of Mountain Sucker Catostomus Platyrhynchus From The Black Hills: Precision, Maturation, And Growth, Jason J. Breeggemann, Cari-Ann Hayer, Jacob Krause, Luke D. Schultz, Katie N. Bertrand, Brian D. S. Graeb Nov 2014

Estimating The Ages Of Mountain Sucker Catostomus Platyrhynchus From The Black Hills: Precision, Maturation, And Growth, Jason J. Breeggemann, Cari-Ann Hayer, Jacob Krause, Luke D. Schultz, Katie N. Bertrand, Brian D. S. Graeb

Western North American Naturalist

Mountain Sucker Catostomus platyrhynchus is considered secure across its range, it has been declining in parts of its range, and is listed as a species of greatest conservation need in South Dakota. To our knowledge, no research has identified which calcified structure yields the most precise age estimates for Mountain Sucker and little is known about Mountain Sucker population dynamics. We compared scales, sectioned fin rays, whole otoliths, and polished otoliths to identify which structure provided the most precise age estimates for Mountain Sucker in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Additionally, we quantified recruitment, growth, age and size at ...


Reproduction And Pollination Of The Endangered Dwarf Bear-Poppy Arctomecon Humilis (Papaveraceae) Across A Quarter Century: Unraveling Of A Pollination Web?, Vincent J. Tepedino, John Mull, Terry L. Griswold, Gerald Bryant Nov 2014

Reproduction And Pollination Of The Endangered Dwarf Bear-Poppy Arctomecon Humilis (Papaveraceae) Across A Quarter Century: Unraveling Of A Pollination Web?, Vincent J. Tepedino, John Mull, Terry L. Griswold, Gerald Bryant

Western North American Naturalist

Arctomecon humilis, a rare gypsophile of the extreme northeastern Mojave Desert, is restricted to a few isolated populations (occurrences) in Washington Co, Utah (USA). At several points in the past quarter century, we have studied the breeding system and reproductive success of this endangered species, recorded its pollinators and tested the feasibility of human-assisted gene flow by conducting reciprocal crosses between two isolated occurrences approximately 4 km apart. We found A. humilis to possess a mixed breeding system in the occurrence studied (Beehive Dome in 1988); some plants exhibited self-compatibility but fruit/flowers and seeds/fruit were significantly lower in ...


Population Genetic Structure Of The Baird's Pocket Gopher, Geomys Breviceps, In Eastern Texas, Sarah R. Welborn, Jessica E. Light Nov 2014

Population Genetic Structure Of The Baird's Pocket Gopher, Geomys Breviceps, In Eastern Texas, Sarah R. Welborn, Jessica E. Light

Western North American Naturalist

The Baird’s pocket gopher (Geomys breviceps) is a solitary, fossorial rodent found throughout areas of Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. These rodents are highly modified morphologically for an underground lifestyle, often resulting in limited vagility and isolated populations. Despite these unique characteristics, little is known about the population genetics of pocket gophers. We used mitochondrial and microsatellite data and performed a series of population genetic analyses to better understand the population structure and gene flow among a series of G. brevicepslocalities. Population genetic analyses supported high levels of gene flow among nearby localities (within 2 km of each ...


Plant Community Changes Following Closure Of Artesian Wells In Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado, Sarah J. Garza, Gillian Bowser, Kenneth R. Wilson Nov 2014

Plant Community Changes Following Closure Of Artesian Wells In Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado, Sarah J. Garza, Gillian Bowser, Kenneth R. Wilson

Western North American Naturalist

Artificial artesian wells have existed in the San Luis Valley of south central Colorado for over 100 years and are an important source of water for livestock and wildlife. When Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (GRSA) expanded its boundaries in 2000, 10 of these wells were within the new park boundary. In 2010, the National Park Service capped these wells to restore the surrounding habitat to a more natural state, which was severely disturbed from cattle and wildlife trampling. To study changes after well capping, we compared the plant communities in 2011 and 2012 and measured plant cover ...


Home-Range Size And Subadult Dispersal Of Black Bears In The Cascade Range Of Western Oregon, Dave Immell, Dewaine H. Jackson, Margaret C. Boulay Nov 2014

Home-Range Size And Subadult Dispersal Of Black Bears In The Cascade Range Of Western Oregon, Dave Immell, Dewaine H. Jackson, Margaret C. Boulay

Western North American Naturalist

Knowledge of home range size and subadult dispersal activity of North American black bears is essential for understanding the complexity of how bears interact within populations and the environment. During 1993-98, we monitored 96 radiocollared black bears (Ursus americanus) in the Cascade Range of western Oregon to estimate home range and dispersal movements. Composite fixed-kernel home ranges were calculated for 37 bears. Mean home range size differed between sexes (189.7 km2 for males and 33.6 km2 for females); however, there was no difference between subadult and adult male or subadult and adult female mean home range ...


Rediscovered Populations Of The Idaho Point-Headed Grasshopper, Acrolophitus Pulchellus (Bruner), 1890 (Orthoptera: Acrididae), Beth A. Waterbury Nov 2014

Rediscovered Populations Of The Idaho Point-Headed Grasshopper, Acrolophitus Pulchellus (Bruner), 1890 (Orthoptera: Acrididae), Beth A. Waterbury

Western North American Naturalist

The Idaho point-headed grasshopper, Acrolophitus pulchellus, is a rare endemic of the Sinks Drainages of east-central Idaho. Past collections were infrequent and found few specimens. Searches in 1993 failed to find specimens, leading to speculaton that A. pulchellus was extinct. I report rediscovered populations of A. pulchellus based on 55 capture records (10 collected); describe distribution, habitat, morphological, and life history information; and present the first photos of live adult specimens.


New Flea (Siphonaptera) Record For Heermann's Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys Heermanni), San Luis Obispo County, California, Howard O. Clark Jr., Helen K. Pigage Nov 2014

New Flea (Siphonaptera) Record For Heermann's Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys Heermanni), San Luis Obispo County, California, Howard O. Clark Jr., Helen K. Pigage

Western North American Naturalist

Three Heermann’s kangaroo rats (Dipodomys heermanni), from San Luis Obispo County, California, were examined for ectoparasites. Two species of flea were found,Meringis californicus and Hoplopsyllus anomalus. Occurrence of these two species onDipodomys heermanni has not been reported before and represents new host records.


Front Matter, Vol. 74 No. 3 Nov 2014

Front Matter, Vol. 74 No. 3

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


First Record Of Leucism In The Genus Peromyscus (Mammalia: Rodentia), Issac Camargo, Evelyn Rios, Cristian Cornejo-Latorre, Sergio Ticul Álvarez-Castañeda Nov 2014

First Record Of Leucism In The Genus Peromyscus (Mammalia: Rodentia), Issac Camargo, Evelyn Rios, Cristian Cornejo-Latorre, Sergio Ticul Álvarez-Castañeda

Western North American Naturalist

Leucism is a partial hypopigmentary congenital disorder previously recorded in several species of mammals. This abnormal coloration is unusual in the wild. In August 2013, in the Baja California State, México, we collected two Peromyscus fraterculus (one female and one male) exhibiting leucism. Leucism has not been reported before ingenus Peromyscus, therefore, we documented the first known record. Leucism is a reflex of low levels of genetic diversity in natural populations. It may increase selective pressure on individuals.


End Matter, Vol. 74 No. 3 Nov 2014

End Matter, Vol. 74 No. 3

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


The Plecoptera And Trichoptera Of The Arctic North Slope Of Alaska, Michael R. Kendrick, Alexander D. Huryn Nov 2014

The Plecoptera And Trichoptera Of The Arctic North Slope Of Alaska, Michael R. Kendrick, Alexander D. Huryn

Western North American Naturalist

The Arctic is currently experiencing changes in climate more rapid than any other biome. This warming trend has resulted in significant abiotic changes to the seasonal patterns of freshwater ecosystems. Thorough inventories of freshwater insect communities are required to provide benchmarks allowing for the detection of range shifts in response to a warming climate. While statewide studies have been conducted for Trichoptera and Plecoptera, species accounts for these orders in Arctic Alaska have received relatively little attention. We surveyed Plecoptera and Trichoptera of Alaska’s Arctic North Slope at a variety of habitat types over an 11 year period. We ...


Influence Of Nonnative And Native Ungulate Biomass And Seasonal Precipitation On The Vegetation Production In A Great Basin Ecosystem, Linda C. Zeigenfuss, Kathryn A. Schoenecker, Jason I. Ransom, Drew A. Ignizio, Tracy Mask Nov 2014

Influence Of Nonnative And Native Ungulate Biomass And Seasonal Precipitation On The Vegetation Production In A Great Basin Ecosystem, Linda C. Zeigenfuss, Kathryn A. Schoenecker, Jason I. Ransom, Drew A. Ignizio, Tracy Mask

Western North American Naturalist

The negative effects of equid grazers in semi-arid ecosystems of the American West has been considered to be disproportionate to the influence of native ungulates in these systems because of their large body size, hoof shape, and short history on the landscape relative to native grazers. Tools which can model the degree of influence of various grazers in an ecosystem and separate these effects from those caused by other variables (climate, anthropomorphic disturbances) can be useful to managers in determining location of non-native grazer impacts and assessing the effect of management actions targeted at different grazer populations. We used remotely ...


Pygmy Rabbit (Brachylagus Idahoensis) Habitat Selection: Does Sagebrush (Artemisia Sp.) Age Influence Selection?, Robert J. Edgel, Janet L. Pierce, Randy T. Larsen Aug 2014

Pygmy Rabbit (Brachylagus Idahoensis) Habitat Selection: Does Sagebrush (Artemisia Sp.) Age Influence Selection?, Robert J. Edgel, Janet L. Pierce, Randy T. Larsen

Western North American Naturalist

The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is a sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) obligate that depends on sagebrush habitats for food and cover throughout its life cycle. Invasive species, frequent fires, overgrazing, conversion of land to agriculture, energy development, and many other factors have contributed to recent declines in both quantity and quality of sagebrush habitats required by pygmy rabbits. Given declining availability of sagebrush, there is a need to identify characteristics of suitable pygmy rabbit habitat. Although habitat selection information exists from several western states, data is limited for pygmy rabbits in Utah at the extent of their range. We sampled 77 ...


Regional Branching Relationships In Carnegiea Gigantea, A Keystone Cactus, Taly Dawn Drezner Aug 2014

Regional Branching Relationships In Carnegiea Gigantea, A Keystone Cactus, Taly Dawn Drezner

Western North American Naturalist

The large columnar cactus Carnegiea gigantea branches to increase reproductive output. The branches of this keystone species also provide shelter to a large portion of the Sonoran Desert’s fauna. In this study, branch length was used to reconstruct branch establishment at 2 populations to determine branching patterns over time and the relationship across populations. Branches showed high establishment but relatively low survival. Either more branches establish than eventually survive or growth is slow when branches are smaller, thereby biasing the distribution of lengths due to the differences in growth rate. Also, the distribution of branch lengths (i.e., branch ...


Pinyon Pine Mortality Alters Communities Of Ground-Dwelling Arthropods, Robert J. Delph, Michael J. Clifford, Neil S. Cobb, Paulette L. Ford, Sandra L. Brantley Aug 2014

Pinyon Pine Mortality Alters Communities Of Ground-Dwelling Arthropods, Robert J. Delph, Michael J. Clifford, Neil S. Cobb, Paulette L. Ford, Sandra L. Brantley

Western North American Naturalist

We documented the effect of drought-induced mortality of pinyon pine (Pinus edulisEngelm.) on communities of ground-dwelling arthropods. Tree mortality alters microhabitats utilized by ground-dwelling arthropods by increasing solar radiation, dead woody debris, and understory vegetation. Our major objectives were to determine (1) whether there were changes in community composition, species richness, and abundance of ground-dwelling arthropods associated with pinyon mortality and (2) whether specific habitat characteristics and microhabitats accounted for these changes. We predicted shifts in community composition and increases in arthropod diversity and abundance due to the presumed increased complexity of microhabitats from both standing dead and fallen ...


Habitat Suitability As A Limiting Factor For Establishment In A Narrow Endemic: Abronia Alpina (Nyctaginaceae), Meredith D. Jabis, Tina J. Ayers Aug 2014

Habitat Suitability As A Limiting Factor For Establishment In A Narrow Endemic: Abronia Alpina (Nyctaginaceae), Meredith D. Jabis, Tina J. Ayers

Western North American Naturalist

Understanding the causes of narrow endemism is crucial to conservation, particularly in biodiversity hotspots like the California Floristic Province. The loss of rare species as a consequence of climate change could result in substantial reductions in biodiversity, especially in high-elevation systems. We investigated causes of range restriction by using the narrow alpine endemic Abronia alpina (Ramshaw Meadows sand verbena) as a case study. This study examined habitat suitability as a limiting factor for the establishment of Abronia alpina, an endemic native to only 2 meadow systems in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Inyo National Forest, California, USA. We tested habitat suitability ...


Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx Californianus) Home Range And Habitat Selection In West Texas, Andrea E. Montalvo, Dean Ransom Jr., Roel R. Lopez Aug 2014

Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx Californianus) Home Range And Habitat Selection In West Texas, Andrea E. Montalvo, Dean Ransom Jr., Roel R. Lopez

Western North American Naturalist

We studied Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus) habitat use during spring and summer 2011 on the Rolling Plains Quail Research Ranch in the Red Rolling Plains of west Texas. We captured 9 roadrunners (1 male, 8 females) and fitted each with a 10-g backpack-style radio-transmitter. We relocated roadrunners 2–4 times per week from February to August. Roadrunners used a mean minimum convex polygon home range of 43.0 ha, a 50% core range of 11.9 ha, and 33% overlap between adjacent home ranges. Home ranges were approximately half the size of those reported in a recent study of roadrunners ...


Survey Of Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) From The Kuskokwim River Watershed In Western Alaska, Barbara L. Hayford, Robert L. Newell, Zach J. Crete Aug 2014

Survey Of Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) From The Kuskokwim River Watershed In Western Alaska, Barbara L. Hayford, Robert L. Newell, Zach J. Crete

Western North American Naturalist

Rapidly declining diversity of freshwater species necessitates surveys to document and describe patterns in biodiversity. To this end, a survey of Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) was conducted in a remote watershed of western Alaska. Larval chironomids were collected from 16 stream sites in the Kuskokwim River watershed in 2009 and 2010. Twenty-seven chironomid taxa were identified. Orthocladiinae was the most diverse subfamily and was numerically dominant at all sites except a glacial runoff stream where Diamesinae was numerically dominant. Two rare chironomids were collected in the study: an undescribed species of Stilocladius and a species ofOrthocladius (Mesorthocladius). The latter genus ...


Biogeography Of Ammophila (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) In The Grand Canyon Ecoregion, Southwestern Usa, Lawrence E. Stevens, Arnold S. Menke Aug 2014

Biogeography Of Ammophila (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) In The Grand Canyon Ecoregion, Southwestern Usa, Lawrence E. Stevens, Arnold S. Menke

Western North American Naturalist

We compiled distribution data on Ammophila collected in the Grand Canyon ecoregion (GCE) in northern Arizona and southern Utah. We report 35 species occurring from 350 to 2865 m elevation. Three new state records are reported for Arizona and one for Utah. A total of 73.8%–80.5% of the 41 Arizona Ammophila species occur in the GCE, and 16 species were detected in Grand Canyon National Park. Four species in Utah’s portion of the GCE are not known to occur in Arizona. Five Ammophila species were frequently captured (A. azteca, A. pruinosa complex, A. breviceps, A. acuta ...


Gastrointestinal Helminths From Eight Species Of Aspidoscelis (Squamata: Teiidae) From Mexico, Stephen R. Goldberg, Charles R. Bursey, Jeanette Arreola Aug 2014

Gastrointestinal Helminths From Eight Species Of Aspidoscelis (Squamata: Teiidae) From Mexico, Stephen R. Goldberg, Charles R. Bursey, Jeanette Arreola

Western North American Naturalist

Seventy-four representatives of 8 species of whiptail lizards (Aspidoscelis ssp.), from Mexico were examined for helminths: Aspidoscelis calidipes (n = 8), A. communis (n = 10), A. cozumelae (n = 9), A. gularis (n = 10), A. lineattissima (n = 9), A. motaguae (n = 11), A. parvisocia (n = 9), and A. sackii (n = 8). We found one species of Cestoda,Oochoristica scelopori, and 7 species of Nematoda, including Abbreviata terrapenis, Parapharyngodon alvarengai, Pharyngodon warneri, Spauligodon garciaprietoi, Spinicauda spinicauda, Thubunaea cnemidophorus, and Physaloptera sp. Mean helminth diversity per lizard species was 3.1 (SD 1.8). Spauligodon garciaprietoi was present in 6 of 8 (75%) of ...


Hazards To Birds From Open Metal Pipes, Charles D. Hathcock, Jeanne M. Fair Aug 2014

Hazards To Birds From Open Metal Pipes, Charles D. Hathcock, Jeanne M. Fair

Western North American Naturalist

There are reports of open polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipes causing bird deaths in the western United States (Brattstrom 1995). Here, we document cases of open bollards and open pipes on gates causing bird deaths in northern New Mexico. At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a 10,240-ha site, over 100 uncapped 10.16 cm diameter protective bollard posts were examined, and 27% of the open bollards contained dead birds. A total of 88 open pipes used as gate posts, with diameters of 8.89 cm or 10.16 cm, were examined, and 11% contained dead birds. We conducted a preliminary ...


Herbeal Feeding Behavior Of The New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus Hudsonius Luteus), Greg D. Wright, Jennifer K. Frey Aug 2014

Herbeal Feeding Behavior Of The New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus Hudsonius Luteus), Greg D. Wright, Jennifer K. Frey

Western North American Naturalist

We report the first observations of feeding behavior by free-ranging New Mexico meadow jumping mice (Zapus hudsonius luteus). We made observations during a radiotelemetry study of Z. h. luteus in the floodplain of the Rio Grande at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro Co., New Mexico, in 2009 and 2010. We observed Z. h. luteus eat the achenes or seeds of the order Cyperales: common threesquare (Schoenoplectus pungens), spikerush (Eleocharis spp.), saltgrass (Distichlis spicata), foxtail barley (Hordeum jubatum), Saunder’s wildrye (Elymus saundersii), Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus), slender wheatgrass (Elymus trachycaulus), and knotgrass (Paspalum distichum). Mice frequently foraged 0 ...


Survival And Cause-Specific Mortality Of Merriam's Wild Turkeys In The Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, Mark A. Peyton, Sarah R. Kindschuh, Lance J. Bernal, Robert R. Parmenter, Philip S. Gipson Aug 2014

Survival And Cause-Specific Mortality Of Merriam's Wild Turkeys In The Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, Mark A. Peyton, Sarah R. Kindschuh, Lance J. Bernal, Robert R. Parmenter, Philip S. Gipson

Western North American Naturalist

Merriam’s Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) is a species of interest for managers and is considered economically valuable through wildlife viewing and hunting. We captured, radio-marked, and monitored 49 turkeys (27 males, 22 females) over a 3-year period (2008–2011) in the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. Annual Kaplan–Meier survival estimates varied among years (range 0.33–0.80). Lowest seasonal survival of 0.42 (SE 0.14) occurred during winter 2010 (1 Dec 2009–31 Mar 2010). We observed 20 fatalities of the 49 monitored turkeys. Predation by bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma ...


Roost And Forage Site Fidelity Of Western Small-Footed Myotis (Myotis Ciliolabrum) In An Oregon Desert Canyon, Thomas J. Rodhouse, Kenneth J. Hyde Aug 2014

Roost And Forage Site Fidelity Of Western Small-Footed Myotis (Myotis Ciliolabrum) In An Oregon Desert Canyon, Thomas J. Rodhouse, Kenneth J. Hyde

Western North American Naturalist

We describe the roosting and foraging behavior patterns of western small-footed myotis (Myotis ciliolabrum) observed during a vertebrate inventory of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in north central Oregon. We used radiotelemetry to track 9 adult females, including 3 lactating and 6 postlactating bats, during July–September 2003. We found that these bats showed considerable fidelity to a common foraging area at the confluence of the John Day River and a tributary creek along which bats commuted and roosted. Individual bats did not roost together, but each showed high fidelity to local clusters of rock outcrops in small ...


An Observation Of Apparent Teaching Behavior In The Pallid Bat, Antrozous Pallidus, Jessie P. Bunkley, Jesse R. Barber Aug 2014

An Observation Of Apparent Teaching Behavior In The Pallid Bat, Antrozous Pallidus, Jessie P. Bunkley, Jesse R. Barber

Western North American Naturalist

During a laboratory study of pallid bat (Antrozous pallidus) hunting behavior, we observed an interaction wherein an adult female appeared to aid a juvenile male in learning a novel foraging task. This single observation adheres to the 3 requirements of teaching outlined by Caro and Hauser (1992). A female bat experienced with a hunting task modified her behavior in the presence of a naïve observing male, resulting in a cost of reduced food availability to the female when she was hungry, while directing the male to food resources and accelerating his learning of a foraging task. The experienced female bat ...


End Matter, Vol. 74 No. 2 Aug 2014

End Matter, Vol. 74 No. 2

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


Front Matter, Vol. 74 No. 2 Aug 2014

Front Matter, Vol. 74 No. 2

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


Cave-Dwelling Arthropods And Vertebrates Of North Rim Grand Canyon, With Notes On Ecology And Management, J. Judson Wynne, Kyle D. Voyles May 2014

Cave-Dwelling Arthropods And Vertebrates Of North Rim Grand Canyon, With Notes On Ecology And Management, J. Judson Wynne, Kyle D. Voyles

Western North American Naturalist

Prior to this study, there was no information on arthropods, bats, and other vertebrates of caves in northwesternmost Arizona. Based on invertebrate and vertebrate inventory work conducted during 2005 and 2006, we provide future directions for conservation and management for caves on Grand Canyon–Parashant National Monument, northwestern Arizona. Baseline investigations to find and identify arthropods, bats, and other vertebrates were conducted at 7 of the largest known caves on the monument. We identified 52 morphospecies including 44 arthropods, 4 bats, and 4 other vertebrates. Of the cave-dwelling arthropods, we found 10 eisodophiles, 6 troglophiles, 8 questionable troglophiles, 7 trogloxenes ...


Phylogeography Of The Scaled Quail In The American Southwest, Damon Williford, Randy W. Deyoung, Rodney L. Honeycutt, Leonard A. Brennan, Fidel Hernández May 2014

Phylogeography Of The Scaled Quail In The American Southwest, Damon Williford, Randy W. Deyoung, Rodney L. Honeycutt, Leonard A. Brennan, Fidel Hernández

Western North American Naturalist

We used sequences from the mitochondrial control region to examine the phylogeography and historical demography of the Scaled Quail and to determine whether the geographic distributions of mtDNA genealogy were concordant with the distribution of the subspecies. Overall, the Scaled Quail exhibited lower haplotype and nucleotide diversity than other quail species. The highest levels of haplotype diversity were found in 3 Texas counties: Dimmit, La Salle, and Hudspeth. The Scaled Quail exhibited no phylogeographic structure among its 16 haplotypes, and the patterns of genetic variation were not congruent with potential geographic barriers or current subspecies taxonomy. The geographic distribution of ...