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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

A Free-Ranging, Feral Mare Equus Caballus Affords Similar Maternal Care To Her Genetic And Adopted Offspring, Cassandra M.V. Nuñez, James S. Adelman, Daniel I. Rubenstein Nov 2013

A Free-Ranging, Feral Mare Equus Caballus Affords Similar Maternal Care To Her Genetic And Adopted Offspring, Cassandra M.V. Nuñez, James S. Adelman, Daniel I. Rubenstein

Cassandra M.V. Nuñez

Adoption of nongenetic offspring occurs in a variety of species but is rare in equids. We report a case of adoption by a free-ranging, feral mare Equus caballus and compare the maternal care received by her genetic offspring (born 1995) to that of her adopted offspring (born 1996) for the first 30 weeks of development. We compare five measures of care: (1) total time spent suckling, (2) mare aggression during suckling, (3) number of mare-terminated suckling bouts, (4) contact maintenance, and (5) mare-foal distance. For most behaviors, we detected no difference in the mare’s treatment of the two foals ...


Chemical And Sensory Characterization Of Scent Markings In Great Cats: A Systematic Review, Simone B. Soso, Jacek A. Koziel Jun 2013

Chemical And Sensory Characterization Of Scent Markings In Great Cats: A Systematic Review, Simone B. Soso, Jacek A. Koziel

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Conference Proceedings and Presentations

No abstract provided.


Rejoinder: Challenge And Opportunity In The Study Of Ungulate Migration Amid Environmental Change, Arthur D. Middleton, Matthew J. Kauffman, Douglas E. Mcwhirter, John G. Cook, Rachel C. Cook, Abigail A. Nelson, Michael D. Jimenez, Robert W. Klaver Jun 2013

Rejoinder: Challenge And Opportunity In The Study Of Ungulate Migration Amid Environmental Change, Arthur D. Middleton, Matthew J. Kauffman, Douglas E. Mcwhirter, John G. Cook, Rachel C. Cook, Abigail A. Nelson, Michael D. Jimenez, Robert W. Klaver

Natural Resource Ecology and Management Publications

Increasingly, animals that migrate long distances to exploit seasonal habitats must traverse political boundaries capable of altering the very ecological gradients that promote migratory behavior. This transboundary aspect of migration presents many new challenges and opportunities for research and conservation (e.g., Bolger et al. 2008, Taillon et al. 2012). Work to date has often focused on physical barriers to movement (roads, fences, and housing and energy development) that can threaten migratory populations to varying degrees (Holdo et al. 2011, Sawyer et al. 2013). However, even in the absence of conspicuous barriers, political and jurisdictional boundaries can bring dramatic differences ...


Animal Migration Amid Shifting Patterns Of Phenology And Predation: Lessons From A Yellowstone Elk Herd, Arthur D. Middleton, Matthew J. Kauffman, Douglas E. Mcwhirter, John G. Cook, Rachel C. Cook, Abigali A. Nelson, Michael D. Jimenez, Robert W. Klaver Jun 2013

Animal Migration Amid Shifting Patterns Of Phenology And Predation: Lessons From A Yellowstone Elk Herd, Arthur D. Middleton, Matthew J. Kauffman, Douglas E. Mcwhirter, John G. Cook, Rachel C. Cook, Abigali A. Nelson, Michael D. Jimenez, Robert W. Klaver

Natural Resource Ecology and Management Publications

Migration is a striking behavioral strategy by which many animals enhance resource acquisition while reducing predation risk. Historically, the demographic benefits of such movements made migration common, but in many taxa the phenomenon is considered globally threatened. Here we describe a long-term decline in the productivity of elk (Cervus elaphus) that migrate through intact wilderness areas to protected summer ranges inside Yellowstone National Park, USA. We attribute this decline to a long-term reduction in the demographic benefits that ungulates typically gain from migration. Among migratory elk, we observed a 21-year, 70% reduction in recruitment and a 4-year, 19% depression in ...


Telomere Length, Non-Breeding Habitat And Return Rate In Male American Redstarts, Frederic Angelier, Carol M. Vleck, Rebecca L. Holberton, Peter P. Marra Jan 2013

Telomere Length, Non-Breeding Habitat And Return Rate In Male American Redstarts, Frederic Angelier, Carol M. Vleck, Rebecca L. Holberton, Peter P. Marra

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

  1. Telomeres are long repetitive noncoding sequences of DNA located at the ends of chromosomes. Recently, the study of telomere dynamics has been increasingly used to investigate ecological questions. However, little is currently known about the relationships that link environmental conditions, telomere dynamics and fitness in wild vertebrates.
  2. Using a small migratory bird (American redstart, Setophaga ruticilla), we investigated how telomere dynamics can be affected by non-breeding habitat quality and to what extent telomere length can predict the return rate of males.
  3. We show that telomeres shorten in most individuals over a 1-year period and, importantly, that telomeres of individuals wintering ...


Complex Interplay Of Body Condition, Life History, And Prevailing Environment Shapes Immune Defenses Of Garter Snakes In The Wild, Maria G. Palacios, Anne M. Bronikowski, Joan E. Cunnick Jan 2013

Complex Interplay Of Body Condition, Life History, And Prevailing Environment Shapes Immune Defenses Of Garter Snakes In The Wild, Maria G. Palacios, Anne M. Bronikowski, Joan E. Cunnick

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

The immunocompetence “pace-of-life” hypothesis proposes that fast-living organisms should invest more in innate immune defenses and less in adaptive defenses compared to slow-living ones. We found some support for this hypothesis in two lifehistory ecotypes of the snake Thamnophis elegans; fast-living individuals show higher levels of innate immunity compared to slow-living ones. Here, we optimized a lymphocyte proliferation assay to assess the complementary prediction that slowliving snakes should in turn show stronger adaptive defenses. We also assessed the “environmental” hypothesis that predicts that slow-living snakes should show lower levels of immune defenses (both innate and adaptive) given the harsher environment ...


Reproductive Decisions Of Mountain Plovers In Southern Phillips County, Montana, Paul Daniel Blom Skrade Jan 2013

Reproductive Decisions Of Mountain Plovers In Southern Phillips County, Montana, Paul Daniel Blom Skrade

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus) is a shorebird of conservation concern that breeds in the Great Plains and the Great Basin. They have an uncommon uniparental care system where males and females tend separate nests. Although males and females have similar incubation and chick-rearing responsibilities, it is thought that the males arrive first to the breeding grounds in early to mid-April, establish loose territories, and compete for females. Long-term monitoring of this species in north-central Montana has allowed for studies comparing the effectiveness of the two sexes at separately raising young, showing evidence for differences in nest and brood survival ...