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Zoology

2013

Brigham Young University

Articles 1 - 30 of 88

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Seasonal Habitat Selection By Elk In North Central Utah, Jeffrey L. Beck, Kurt T. Smith, Jerran T. Flinders, Craig L. Clyde Dec 2013

Seasonal Habitat Selection By Elk In North Central Utah, Jeffrey L. Beck, Kurt T. Smith, Jerran T. Flinders, Craig L. Clyde

Western North American Naturalist

Understanding anthropogenic and environmental factors that influence seasonal habitat selection is critical in establishing conservation objectives for wildlife populations. However, many resource selection studies provide inferences only for single seasons, potentially masking factors essential to populations during other times of the year. Our objective was to model elk (Cervus elaphus) habitat selection for 4 seasons to identify factors influencing selection within and across seasons. Using aerial relocation data, we evaluated seasonal habitat selection for 46 radio-marked, migratory adult female elk in a 6123-km2 landscape in north central Utah, USA, from 1993 to 1997. We evaluated habitat use and availability ...


Net Primary Productivity Of Subalpine Meadows In Yosemite National Park In Relation To Climate Variability, Peggy E. Moore, Jan W. Van Wagtendonk, Julie L. Yee, Mitchel P. Mcclaran, David N. Cole, Neil K. Mcdougald, Matthew L. Brooks Dec 2013

Net Primary Productivity Of Subalpine Meadows In Yosemite National Park In Relation To Climate Variability, Peggy E. Moore, Jan W. Van Wagtendonk, Julie L. Yee, Mitchel P. Mcclaran, David N. Cole, Neil K. Mcdougald, Matthew L. Brooks

Western North American Naturalist

Subalpine meadows are some of the most ecologically important components of mountain landscapes, and primary productivity is important to the maintenance of meadow functions. Understanding how changes in primary productivity are associated with variability in moisture and temperature will become increasingly important with current and anticipated changes in climate. Our objective was to describe patterns and variability in aboveground live vascular plant biomass in relation to climatic factors. We harvested aboveground biomass at peak growth from four 64-m2 plots each in xeric, mesic, and hydric meadows annually from 1994 to 2000. Data from nearby weather stations provided independent variables ...


Seed-Feeding Beetles (Bruchinae, Curculionidae, Brentidae) From Legumes (Dalea Ornata, Astragalus Filipes) And Other Forbs Needed For Restoring Rangelands Of The Intermountain West, James H. Cane, Clarence Johnson, Jesus Romero Napoles, Douglas A. Johnson, Robert Hammon Dec 2013

Seed-Feeding Beetles (Bruchinae, Curculionidae, Brentidae) From Legumes (Dalea Ornata, Astragalus Filipes) And Other Forbs Needed For Restoring Rangelands Of The Intermountain West, James H. Cane, Clarence Johnson, Jesus Romero Napoles, Douglas A. Johnson, Robert Hammon

Western North American Naturalist

Seed-feeding beetles of the genera Acanthoscelides, Apion, and occasionally Tychiuswere commonly found occurring in seeds from wild populations of Astragalus filipesand Dalea ornata across rangelands of the United States Intermountain West, resulting in many new state, county, and host records. These 2 legumes, as well as other perennial herbaceous species, are being commercially farmed to produce seed supplies to rehabilitate sagebrush-steppe and adjoining juniper woodlands following wildfires. Most of the seeds examined in this study hosted one or more seed-feeding beetles; beetles that pupate and overwinter in the seeds pose the risk of being transported to storage warehouses ...


Insect Prey Eaten By Hoary Bats (Lasiurus Cinereus) Prior To Fatal Collisions With Wind Turbines, Ernest W. Valdez, Paul M. Cryan Dec 2013

Insect Prey Eaten By Hoary Bats (Lasiurus Cinereus) Prior To Fatal Collisions With Wind Turbines, Ernest W. Valdez, Paul M. Cryan

Western North American Naturalist

Wind turbines are being deployed all across the world to meet the growing demand for energy, and in many areas, these turbines are causing the deaths of insectivorous migratory bats. One of the hypothesized causes of bat susceptibility is that bats are attracted to insects on or near the turbines. We examined insect remains in the stomachs and intestines of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) found dead beneath wind turbines in New York and Texas to evaluate the hypothesis that bats die while feeding at turbines. Most of the bats we examined had full stomachs, indicating that they fed in the ...


Influence Of Boulders On Netleaf Hackberry (Celtis Reticulata) Growth And Distribution In The Wasatch Foothills, Alex Argyle, Michael T. Stevens Dec 2013

Influence Of Boulders On Netleaf Hackberry (Celtis Reticulata) Growth And Distribution In The Wasatch Foothills, Alex Argyle, Michael T. Stevens

Western North American Naturalist

In a landscape, abiotic features, such as boulders, influence microhabitats and consequently affect patterns of vegetation. We hypothesized that boulders in the foothills of the Wasatch Mountains east of Provo, Utah, affected the growth patterns of netleaf hackberry (Celtis reticulata) by providing shade on their north faces. To test this hypothesis, we set up 3 transects 6 m wide and up to 50 m long. Along these transects, we measured all hackberries taller than 30 cm (n = 249). We recorded whether the hackberries grew within 0.5 m of a boulder that was at least 0.5 m along one ...


An Arizona Bark Scorpion (Centruroides Sculpturatus) Found Consuming A Venomous Prey Item Nearly Twice Its Length, Michael M. Webber, Matthew R. Graham Dec 2013

An Arizona Bark Scorpion (Centruroides Sculpturatus) Found Consuming A Venomous Prey Item Nearly Twice Its Length, Michael M. Webber, Matthew R. Graham

Western North American Naturalist

Arizona bark scorpions (Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing) are commonly found throughout the Sonoran Desert in southwestern North America, and they are well known for being the most venomous scorpion in the United States. Despite their medical significance, C. sculpturatus remains ecologically understudied, and little is known regarding its natural foraging and feeding behaviors. Here, we present the first documented case of C. sculpturatus feeding on the Sonoran Desert centipede (Scolopendra polymorpha Wood) in the wild.


Los Alacranes de Corteza de Arizona (Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing), por lo general, se encuentran en todo el Desierto de Sonora, en el sudoeste de Norteamérica, y ...


Helminths Of The Speckled Rattlesnake, Crotalus Mitchellii (Squamata: Viperidae), Stephen R. Goldberg, Charles R. Bursey, Xavier Glaudas Dec 2013

Helminths Of The Speckled Rattlesnake, Crotalus Mitchellii (Squamata: Viperidae), Stephen R. Goldberg, Charles R. Bursey, Xavier Glaudas

Western North American Naturalist

Fifty-six speckled rattlesnakes, Crotalus mitchellii, from western North America were examined for helminths. One species of Cestoda (tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides sp.) and 5 species of Nematoda (gravid adults of Abbreviata terrapenis, Physaloptera abjecta, Thubunaea cnemidophorus, and Travassoascaris araujoi and larvae ofPhysocephalus sp.) were found. Travassoascaris araujoi had the highest prevalence and greatest mean intensity of helminths infecting C. mitchellii. Three new host records forC. mitchellii are reported. As has been reported for other North American rattlesnakes,C. mitchellii is parasitized by “generalist” helminths.


Cincuenta y seis Viboras de Cascabel (Cascabeles Pintítas, Crotalus mitchellii) del oeste de América del ...


Outstanding Natural History Paper Of 2012 Dec 2013

Outstanding Natural History Paper Of 2012

Western North American Naturalist

The winning paper is "Site-occupancy monitoring of an ecosystem indicator: linking characteristics of riparian vegetation to beaver occurrence" by Stewart W. Breck, Michael I. Goldstein, and Sanjay Pyare (WNAN 72:432–441).


Front Matter, Vol. 73 No. 4 Dec 2013

Front Matter, Vol. 73 No. 4

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


End Matter, Vol. 73 No. 4 Dec 2013

End Matter, Vol. 73 No. 4

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


Evaluating Survival Of Greater Sage-Grouse Chicks In Strawberry Valley, Utah, By Use Of Microtransmitters: Does Handling Time Negatively Influence Survival Rates?, Jared J. Baxter, Jordan P. Hennefer, Rick J. Baxter, Randy T. Larsen, Jerran T. Flinders Dec 2013

Evaluating Survival Of Greater Sage-Grouse Chicks In Strawberry Valley, Utah, By Use Of Microtransmitters: Does Handling Time Negatively Influence Survival Rates?, Jared J. Baxter, Jordan P. Hennefer, Rick J. Baxter, Randy T. Larsen, Jerran T. Flinders

Western North American Naturalist

Research indicates that low nest success and juvenile survival may be factors contributing to Greater Sage-Grouse population declines. Recent technological advances in microtransmitters have allowed researchers to monitor individual chicks and broods. We initiated a chick survival study in 2006 and used microtransmitters to (1) examine the viability of using microtransmitters on chicks to assess survival, including the effect of handling time during the suturing process; (2) estimate overall chick survival; and (3) compare chick survival in the Strawberry Valley population to other published reports. We used a known-fate model in program MARK to estimate ĉ (overdispersion), weekly survival rates ...


Impacts From Winter–Early Spring Elk Grazing In Foothills Rough Fescue Grassland, Tanya M. Thrift, Tracy K. Mosley, Jeffrey C. Mosley Dec 2013

Impacts From Winter–Early Spring Elk Grazing In Foothills Rough Fescue Grassland, Tanya M. Thrift, Tracy K. Mosley, Jeffrey C. Mosley

Western North American Naturalist

Foothills rough fescue (Festuca campestris) grasslands provide important foraging habitat for wildlife and livestock in the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. Foothills rough fescue is sensitive to grazing during late spring–early summer but is believed to be more tolerant of grazing during winter–early spring. We evaluated vegetation and soil impacts from long-term winter–early spring grazing at 2 intensities (HG = heavy grazing, LG = light grazing). We studied a foothills rough fescue grassland in west central Montana, USA, that had been grazed almost exclusively by Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) during winter–early spring for 58 years ...


Impact Of Livestock Grazing On Plant And Small Mammal Communities In The Ruby Mountains, Northeastern Nevada, Eric A. Rickart, Klaus G. Bienek, Rebecca J. Rowe Dec 2013

Impact Of Livestock Grazing On Plant And Small Mammal Communities In The Ruby Mountains, Northeastern Nevada, Eric A. Rickart, Klaus G. Bienek, Rebecca J. Rowe

Western North American Naturalist

We assessed the effects of livestock grazing on vegetation and small mammals in semiarid habitat at a site in northeastern Nevada. Habitat within a fenced exclosure that had been protected from grazing for more than 50 years supported more vegetation and had greater plant diversity compared to habitat immediately outside the exclosure. Likewise, species richness and abundance of small mammals were greater in ungrazed areas. Results suggest that grazing regulation in recent decades may account for some of the changes seen in regional plants and small mammals over the past century. The incorporation of long-term exclosures in a comparative framework ...


Long-Distance Movement In A Dusky Great Horned Owl And Limits To Phylogeography For Establishing Provenance, Robert W. Dickerman, Sabrina M. Mcnew, Christopher C. Witt Dec 2013

Long-Distance Movement In A Dusky Great Horned Owl And Limits To Phylogeography For Establishing Provenance, Robert W. Dickerman, Sabrina M. Mcnew, Christopher C. Witt

Western North American Naturalist

The Dusky Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus saturatus) of the Pacific Northwest region of North America is generally considered to be nonmigratory. Here we report a specimen of a Dusky Great Horned Owl that was salvaged in New Mexico and identified based on comparison of its plumage with a large series of museum skins. We attempted to corroborate this identification by comparing mitochondrial DNA sequences between the specimen and a representative sample of 5 Great Horned Owl subspecies from western North America. This analysis revealed minimal mitochondrial genetic variation and no evidence of population genetic structure, suggesting that the marked ...


Rodent-Mediated Interactions Among Seed Species Of Differing Quality In A Shrubstepe Ecosystem, Karen H. Beard, Craig A. Faulhaber, Frank P. Howe, Thomas C. Edwards Jr. Dec 2013

Rodent-Mediated Interactions Among Seed Species Of Differing Quality In A Shrubstepe Ecosystem, Karen H. Beard, Craig A. Faulhaber, Frank P. Howe, Thomas C. Edwards Jr.

Western North American Naturalist

Interactions among seeds, mediated by granivorous rodents, are likely to play a strong role in shrubsteppe ecosystem restoration. Past studies typically consider only pairwise interactions between preferred and less preferred seed species, whereas rangeland seedings are likely to contain more than 2 seed species, potentially leading to complex interactions. We examined how the relative proportion of seeds in a 3-species polyculture changes rodent seed selectivity (i.e., removal) and indirect interactions among seeds. We presented 2 rodent species, Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mice) andPerognathus parvus (pocket mice), in arenas with 3-species seed mixtures that varied in the proportion of a ...


New Records Of Marginal Locations For American Pika (Ochotona Princeps) In The Western Great Basin, Constance I. Millar, Robert D. Westfall, Diane L. Delany Dec 2013

New Records Of Marginal Locations For American Pika (Ochotona Princeps) In The Western Great Basin, Constance I. Millar, Robert D. Westfall, Diane L. Delany

Western North American Naturalist

We describe 46 new site records documenting occupancy by American pika (Ochotona princeps) at 21 locations from 8 mountain regions in the western Great Basin, California, and Nevada. These locations comprise a subset of sites selected from regional surveys to represent marginal, isolated, or otherwise atypical pika locations, and to provide information for assessing environmental tolerance limits. Several locations are known from historic observations (Madeline Plain, Bodie Mtns., Wassuk Mtns., Mono Craters) and are included here to update current status. Site elevations range from 1848 m to 3392 m; relative to the broad range of pika sites in the region ...


Microdistributional Variability Of Larval Caddisflies In Mediterranean-Climate Streams In Northern California, Joseph R. Holomuzki, Paula C. Furey, Rex L. Lowe, Mary E. Power Oct 2013

Microdistributional Variability Of Larval Caddisflies In Mediterranean-Climate Streams In Northern California, Joseph R. Holomuzki, Paula C. Furey, Rex L. Lowe, Mary E. Power

Western North American Naturalist

Knowing how physical and biogenic habitat characteristics affect microspatial variability of larval caddisflies is important to understanding potential population distributions and local species assemblages. We show that larval caddisfly densities and assemblages vary between study reaches and streams on the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in northern California and that species abundance patterns are associated with specific habitat variables. Dicosmoecus gilvipes and Psychoglypha spp. were most dense in 4th-order reaches of the south fork of the Eel River (SFE) and rare or absent in shallow 2nd- and 1st-order reaches of the Elder and Fox Creek tributaries, respectively. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) suggested ...


Tolerance Values And Effects Of Selected Environmental Determinants On Caddisfly (Trichoptera) Distribution In Northwest And North Central Washington, Usa, Dean W. Blinn, David E. Ruiter Oct 2013

Tolerance Values And Effects Of Selected Environmental Determinants On Caddisfly (Trichoptera) Distribution In Northwest And North Central Washington, Usa, Dean W. Blinn, David E. Ruiter

Western North American Naturalist

Caddisflies were collected at 181 wall seep, stream, river, and lake habitats in 7 counties in northwest and north central Washington over a 6-year period. From 17,405 specimens, we identified 164 adult caddisfly species within 62 genera and 16 families. Twenty taxa were new state records, bringing the number of species currently reported from Washington to 230. Species assemblages were compared to altitude, physicochemical factors, aquatic habitats, and land use (urban, agriculture, and forest) on the west and east sides of the North Cascade Range. Species richness showed significant positive correlations to altitude and pH and showed significant negative ...


Milnesium Lagniappe, A New Species Of Water Bear (Tardigrada, Eutardigrada, Apochela, Milnesiidae) From The Southern United States, Harry A. Meyer, Juliana G. Hinton, Maria C. Dupré Oct 2013

Milnesium Lagniappe, A New Species Of Water Bear (Tardigrada, Eutardigrada, Apochela, Milnesiidae) From The Southern United States, Harry A. Meyer, Juliana G. Hinton, Maria C. Dupré

Western North American Naturalist

Over 200 species of freshwater and terrestrial water bears (phylum Tardigrada) are known to occur in North America. Of these, 20 species have been recorded in Louisiana. Foliose and fruticose lichen and moss samples collected in 2011 in the city of Lake Charles and in Sam Houston Jones State Park, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, USA, were stored in paper envelopes and later soaked in tap water overnight. Tardigrade specimens and eggs were extracted and mounted in polyvinyl lactophenol. The samples contained a new species of tardigrade. Milnesium lagniappe sp. n. has claw formula [2-3]-[3-2] and 9 sculptured bands in the ...


An Assessment Of Permanent And Nonpermanent Plots In Riparian Vegetation Monitoring, Caroline M. Laine, Karin M. Kettenring, Brett B. Roper Oct 2013

An Assessment Of Permanent And Nonpermanent Plots In Riparian Vegetation Monitoring, Caroline M. Laine, Karin M. Kettenring, Brett B. Roper

Western North American Naturalist

The aim of this research was to determine whether permanent and nonpermanent plots for describing riparian plant communities would yield the same results. This research was conducted at 4 streams in central eastern Idaho. Permanent and nonpermanent greenline plots (first perennial vegetation adjacent to stream) were sampled repeatedly from June to October 2010, and we assessed differences between plot types by comparing species richness, wetland indicator rating, and percent cover of live vegetation, forbs, graminoids, litter/moss, and bare ground. We found few statistically significant differences between permanent and nonpermanent greenline plots. Because both types of plots yielded similar results ...


Factors Influencing Mortality Associated With The Translocation Of Northern River Otters (Lontra Canadensis) In Utah, Casey C. Day, Matthew D. Westover, Brock R. Mcmillan Oct 2013

Factors Influencing Mortality Associated With The Translocation Of Northern River Otters (Lontra Canadensis) In Utah, Casey C. Day, Matthew D. Westover, Brock R. Mcmillan

Western North American Naturalist

Reintroductions and translocations of northern river otters have been a common management practice throughout the United States from the 1970s to the 2000s. Though many reintroductions have been successful, populations are not always monitored or evaluated post-release. From 2009 through 2012, we translocated 27 radio-marked otters into the Provo River watershed in northern Utah. Our objective was to determine what factors influenced the translocation-related mortality of otters. We developed a series of a priori models and used logistic regression to determine the most influential factors. We used Akaike’s information criterion to evaluate relative model support. We found that the ...


Eastern Fox Squirrel (Sciurus Niger): New Threat To Pecan Orchards In Far West Texas, Jennifer K. Frey, Jaime Iglesias, Krysta Herman Oct 2013

Eastern Fox Squirrel (Sciurus Niger): New Threat To Pecan Orchards In Far West Texas, Jennifer K. Frey, Jaime Iglesias, Krysta Herman

Western North American Naturalist

We report the first records of the eastern fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) in Trans-Pecos Texas. Sciurus niger is widely established in pecan orchards in the Lower El Paso Valley of the Rio Grande, El Paso County. Expansion of this population to other pecan-growing regions along the Rio Grande in New Mexico is possible. Research is needed on both the extent of damage caused by S. niger to pecan production and the control methods in this situation. We recommend a goal of complete eradication of S. niger from this region. Sciurus niger should be delisted as a game species in El ...


Rediscovery Of The Snake Chersodromus Rubriventris (Squamata: Colubridae) In Cloud Forest Of The Sierra Madre Oriental, México, Aurelio Ramírez-Bautista, Christian Berriozabal-Islas, Raciel Cruz-Elizalde, Uriel Hernández-Salinas, Luis Badillo-Saldaña Oct 2013

Rediscovery Of The Snake Chersodromus Rubriventris (Squamata: Colubridae) In Cloud Forest Of The Sierra Madre Oriental, México, Aurelio Ramírez-Bautista, Christian Berriozabal-Islas, Raciel Cruz-Elizalde, Uriel Hernández-Salinas, Luis Badillo-Saldaña

Western North American Naturalist

As presently recognized, the snake genus Chersodromus (Colubridae) is composed of 2 species, C. liebmanni and C. rubriventris, both of which are endemic to eastern Mexico. Distribution of the genus is largely restricted to the states of Veracruz and Oaxaca and broadly corresponds to the south of the Sierra Madre Oriental and the eastern portion of the Transvolcanic Belt. Chersodromus liebmanni is the more common species of the genus and is distributed in the foothills of several localities in central Veracruz and northern Oaxaca. However, C. rubriventris is restricted to only a few small localities in San Luis Potosi and ...


Front Matter, Vol. 73 No. 3 Oct 2013

Front Matter, Vol. 73 No. 3

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


End Matter, Vol. 73 No. 3 Oct 2013

End Matter, Vol. 73 No. 3

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


Dynamics Of Phytoplankton Distribution In Relation To Stratification And Winter Precipitation, Fallen Leaf Lake, California, Paula J. Noble, Sudeep Chandra, David K. Kreamer Oct 2013

Dynamics Of Phytoplankton Distribution In Relation To Stratification And Winter Precipitation, Fallen Leaf Lake, California, Paula J. Noble, Sudeep Chandra, David K. Kreamer

Western North American Naturalist

Seasonal succession and interannual variation of modern diatom populations in Fallen Leaf Lake, Sierra Nevada, California, are characterized and discussed in relation to stratification, water quality, and inflow during spring runoff. Fallen Leaf Lake is a deep, transparent subalpine lake that undergoes a 5–6 month period of stratification and develops a deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) dominated by diatoms. A seasonal succession was observed, where the early spring was dominated by Asterionella formosa, Fragilaria tenera-group (F. tenera and F. nanana), Tabellaria flocculosa strain IIIp, Aulacoseira subarctica, and Urosolenia eriensis. Asterionella formosa and T. flocculosa strain IIIp persisted into the ...


Spatial Ecology Of Female Mule Deer In An Area Proposed For Wind Energy Development, Stephen L. Webb, Matthew R. Dzialak, Dean Houchen, Karl L. Kosciuch, Jeffrey B. Winstead Oct 2013

Spatial Ecology Of Female Mule Deer In An Area Proposed For Wind Energy Development, Stephen L. Webb, Matthew R. Dzialak, Dean Houchen, Karl L. Kosciuch, Jeffrey B. Winstead

Western North American Naturalist

Development for wind energy is increasing rapidly across the United States, particularly in Wyoming, despite a general lack of information on the potential interaction development could have on wildlife species. Therefore, knowledge of the space use and movement patterns of individuals can help define spatial distributions and management unit boundaries for populations prior to development. Such knowledge can also be used as baseline data from which to assess any future impacts on animal populations. We investigated the spatial ecology of female mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus; n = 18) equipped with global positioning system collars from 23 February 2011 to 15 January ...


Distribution And Movement Of Big Spring Spinedace (Lepidomeda Mollispinis Pratensis) In Condor Canyon, Meadow Valley Wash, Nevada, Ian G. Jezorek, Patrick J. Connolly Oct 2013

Distribution And Movement Of Big Spring Spinedace (Lepidomeda Mollispinis Pratensis) In Condor Canyon, Meadow Valley Wash, Nevada, Ian G. Jezorek, Patrick J. Connolly

Western North American Naturalist

Big Spring spinedace (Lepidomeda mollispinis pratensis) is a cyprinid whose entire population occurs within a section of Meadow Valley Wash, Nevada. Other spinedace species have suffered population and range declines (one species is extinct). Managers, concerned about the vulnerability of Big Spring spinedace, have considered habitat restoration actions or translocation, but they have lacked data on distribution or habitat use. Our study occurred in an 8.2-km section of Meadow Valley Wash, including about 7.2 km in Condor Canyon and 0.8 km upstream of the canyon. Big Spring spinedace were present upstream of the currently listed critical habitat ...


Evidence Of Hantavirus Exposure In Rodents From North Texas, Richard M. Pitts, Matthew R. Mauldin, Cody W. Thompson, Jerry R. Choate Oct 2013

Evidence Of Hantavirus Exposure In Rodents From North Texas, Richard M. Pitts, Matthew R. Mauldin, Cody W. Thompson, Jerry R. Choate

Western North American Naturalist

Between 27 June 1997 and 16 May 1999, 423 rodents were collected from North Texas (Collin, Denton, and Grayson counties) by using Sherman live-traps (trapping success rate ~22%). Of the 423 rodents collected, 328 were tested for evidence of IgG antibodies to New World hantaviruses. Hantavirus antibodies were detected in 34 individuals (~10%). This is the first record of hantavirus antibody–positive rodents from the highly urbanized area of North Texas.


Entre el 27 de Junio 1997 y el 16 de Mayo 1999, 423 roedores fueron colectados usando trampas Sherman de capturas en vivo (éxito de captura ~22%) en el ...


Nomenclatural Change Of Chaetodipus Dalquesti, Evelyn Rios, Sergio Ticul Álvarez-Castañeda Oct 2013

Nomenclatural Change Of Chaetodipus Dalquesti, Evelyn Rios, Sergio Ticul Álvarez-Castañeda

Western North American Naturalist

The pocket mouse from the southern Baja California peninsula, Chaetodipus dalquesti,is synonymized to Chaetodipus ammophilus, following the Principle of Priority of the Code of Zoological Nomenclature, because C. ammophilus was described before C. dalquesti. The subspecies are reassigned.


La especie de ratón de abazones del sur de la Península de Baja California, Chaetodipus dalquesti, es sinonimizada a Chaetodipus ammophilus por el Principio de Prioridad, según el Código de Nomenclatura Zoológica vigente, ya que C. ammophilus fue descrita con anterioridad que C. dalquesti. Se reasigna la nomenclatura correcta para las subespecies.