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Zoology

2001

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Deletions In The 7a Orf Of Feline Coronavirus Associated With An Epidemic Of Feline Infectious Peritonitis, Melissa Kennedy, N Boedeker, P Gibbs, Stephen Kania Mar 2012

Deletions In The 7a Orf Of Feline Coronavirus Associated With An Epidemic Of Feline Infectious Peritonitis, Melissa Kennedy, N Boedeker, P Gibbs, Stephen Kania

Stephen A Kania

A population of Persian cats experienced an epidemic of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) over 2 years. Twelve cases of FIP occurred in litters born during this period. Cats contracting FIP were all genetically related through the sire. Feline coronavirus (FCoV) genomic RNA was detected consistently in this study in biologic samples from adult cats, kittens suffering from FIP, and their siblings. Analysis of viral 7a/7b open reading frame (ORFs) were analyzed and revealed two distinct virus variants circulating in the population, one with an intact 7a ORF and one with two major deletions in the 7a ORF. The 7b ...


Detection Of Feline Coronavirus Infection In Captive Cheetahs (Acinonyx Jubatus) By Polymerase Chain Reaction, Melissa Kennedy, S Citino, T Dolorico, A Mcnabb, A Moffat, Stephen Kania Mar 2012

Detection Of Feline Coronavirus Infection In Captive Cheetahs (Acinonyx Jubatus) By Polymerase Chain Reaction, Melissa Kennedy, S Citino, T Dolorico, A Mcnabb, A Moffat, Stephen Kania

Stephen A Kania

Feline coronavirus genetic elements were detected by polymerase chain reaction from blood, fecal samples, and effusive fluid collected from 33 cheetahs in the U.S.A. Feline coronavirus-specific serum antibodies were also measured by indirect immunofluorescence. Ten cheetahs were positive for viral shedding by polymerase chain reaction, whereas 13 were seropositive by immunofluorescence. Results of serology did not consistently correlate with shedding of virus, and the capture antigen used for detection of feline coronavirus-specific antibodies had a significant impact on results. Testing of samples from one population over a 1-yr period indicated chronic infection in some animals. These relatively healthy ...


Preliminary Assessment Of Burrowing Owl Population Status In Wyoming, N. M. Korfanta, L. W. Ayers, S. H. Anderson, David Mcdonald Dec 2001

Preliminary Assessment Of Burrowing Owl Population Status In Wyoming, N. M. Korfanta, L. W. Ayers, S. H. Anderson, David Mcdonald

Zoology Faculty Publications

Currently, little is known about Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) abundance in Wyoming. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WCFD) classifies the Burrowing Owl as a Species of Special Concern. We identified available data sources to assess Burrowing Owl distribution and population trends in Wyoming and conducted a population survey in eastern Wyoming. The WGFD's Wildlife Observation System (WOS), initiated in 1974, shows a decline in Burrowing Owl records, particularly during the 12-yr period 1986-97. However, trends in WOS records over time likely reflect changing interest in the database, rather than real population trends. Likewise, Breeding Bird Survey data since ...


Index From Nebraska Bird Review December 2001 Volume 69 Number 4 Dec 2001

Index From Nebraska Bird Review December 2001 Volume 69 Number 4

Nebraska Bird Review

INDEX (12 pages) A-Z

Adams, Betty 23

Alexander, Irene 23

Allen, Elizabeth 3, 47,159

Allison, Mary 22

American, Redstart 184

Amiotte, Sue 48

Andrews, Ron 5

Anhinga 161

Arizona 96

Avocet, American 37, 57, 94, 116, 140, 169, 204

Babbitt, Charles E. 133

Bachel, Elaine 47

Badura, Laurel 47, 160

Barth, Roland 48

Bedows, Elliott 23, 107, 159

Beede, Dillon 22

Benson, Joan 18

Bielenburg, Warren 23

Yellowlegs
Greater 37, 46, 57, 116, 142, 146,148,169
Lesser 38,46, 57, 116, 133, 136-137,140,142,147,169
sp. 204

Yellowthroat, Common 40, 73, 128, 151,158,185

Young ...


Fall Field Report, August-November 2001, W. Ross Silcock Dec 2001

Fall Field Report, August-November 2001, W. Ross Silcock

Nebraska Bird Review

This Fall Report offers something for everybody. Leading off are significant breeding reports of Ruddy Duck in the Rainwater Basin and Snowy Plover at Lake McConaughy. As observers bird more regularly in late July to early August we are finding that many species begin to move earlier than often realized. There were many reports of birds such as failed breeders, molt migrants, and early-fledged juveniles wandering about. Some of these prove tough identification challenges, too. Early birds were mostly water-related; Eared Grebe, Red-necked Grebe, Double-crested Cormorant, and Osprey, but also Prairie Falcon in the east, and Rusty Blackbird too. Some ...


Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review December 2001 Volume 69 Number 4 Dec 2001

Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review December 2001 Volume 69 Number 4

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review (http://rip.physics.unk.eduinou/) is published quarterly by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $14.00 in the United States; $18.00 for all foreign countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Prichard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.

Memberships in NOU (on a calendar year basis only): Active, $15.00 ...


Nebraska Bird Review- Whole Issue December 2001 Volume 69 Number 4 Dec 2001

Nebraska Bird Review- Whole Issue December 2001 Volume 69 Number 4

Nebraska Bird Review

Table of Contents

Fall Field Report, August-November 2001 Compiled
by W. Ross Silcock ..........................158

Species Accounts.......................... 160

Bird Records of Sporting Editor Sandy Griswold on Fowl
Hunting Trips in the Sand Hills from 1887 to 1928
by J. E. Ducey ..........................190

Index for Volume 69, 1-4 ..........................212


Front Matter, Vol. 61 No. 4 Nov 2001

Front Matter, Vol. 61 No. 4

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


End Matter, Vol. 61 No. 4 Nov 2001

End Matter, Vol. 61 No. 4

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


Physiological, Morphological, And Environmental Variation Among Geographically Isolated Cottonwood (Populus Deltoides) Populations In New Mexico, Diane L. Rowland, Lucille Beals, Amina A. Chaudhry, Ann S. Evans, Larry S. Grodeska Nov 2001

Physiological, Morphological, And Environmental Variation Among Geographically Isolated Cottonwood (Populus Deltoides) Populations In New Mexico, Diane L. Rowland, Lucille Beals, Amina A. Chaudhry, Ann S. Evans, Larry S. Grodeska

Western North American Naturalist

The ability of a plant population to respond and eventually adapt to environmental stress ultimately determines that population's survival. This becomes especially significant in environments where important plant resource levels have radically decreased. Southwestern riparian areas have numerous plant species that are experiencing radical changes in water availability due to construction of dams, and thus their ability to respond to such changes is critical. One such species likely to be greatly affected by these hydrological changes is Populus deltoides var. wislizenii (cottonwood) because it relies heavily on both groundwater and river surface volume as primary water sources. Both water ...


It Takes Guts (And More) To Eat Fruit: Lessons From Avian Nutritional Ecology, D. J. Levey, Carlos Martinez Del Rio Oct 2001

It Takes Guts (And More) To Eat Fruit: Lessons From Avian Nutritional Ecology, D. J. Levey, Carlos Martinez Del Rio

Zoology Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Nebraska And South Dakota 2000 Missouri River Recreational Use Survey: Supplement Ii, Nebraska And South Dakota 2000 Missouri River Recreational Use Survey, Fort Randall Tailwater To Big Sioux River, Gerald Mestl, Gerald Wickstrom, Clifton Stone Oct 2001

Nebraska And South Dakota 2000 Missouri River Recreational Use Survey: Supplement Ii, Nebraska And South Dakota 2000 Missouri River Recreational Use Survey, Fort Randall Tailwater To Big Sioux River, Gerald Mestl, Gerald Wickstrom, Clifton Stone

Nebraska Game and Parks Commission -- White Papers, Conference Presentations, & Manuscripts

The 2000 Missouri River recreational use survey ran 1 April 2000 through 31 December 2000 and covered the Fort Randall Dam to Big Sioux River reach. Recreational user data was collected from postage paid post cards left on vehicles and through personal interviews. Pressure data was collected during a roving survey from ground counts of vehicles, boat trailers, recreational users. Aerial counts were made to compare angling and recreational boating data with ground count data. Recreational users spent an estimated 745,303 hours on the Missouri River survey reach during 2000. Fishing accounted for an estimated 458,749 hours, or ...


Impact Of Bt Corn Pollen On Monarch Butterfly Populations: A Risk Assessment, Mark K. Sears, Richard L. Hellmich, Diane E. Stanley-Horn, Karen S. Oberhauser, John M. Pleasants, Heather R. Mattila, Blair D. Siegfried, Galen P. Dively Oct 2001

Impact Of Bt Corn Pollen On Monarch Butterfly Populations: A Risk Assessment, Mark K. Sears, Richard L. Hellmich, Diane E. Stanley-Horn, Karen S. Oberhauser, John M. Pleasants, Heather R. Mattila, Blair D. Siegfried, Galen P. Dively

Entomology Publications

A collaborative research effort by scientists in several states and in Canada has produced information to develop a formal risk assessment of the impact of Bt corn on monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) populations. Information was sought on the acute toxic effects of Bt corn pollen and the degree to which monarch larvae would be exposed to toxic amounts of Bt pollen on its host plant, the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, found in and around cornfields. Expression of Cry proteins, the active toxicant found in Bt corn tissues, differed among hybrids, and especially so in the concentrations found in pollen of ...


Temporal And Spatial Overlap Between Monarch Larvae And Corn Pollen, Karen S. Oberhauser, Michelle D. Prysby, Heather R. Mattila, Diane E. Stanley-Horn, Mark K. Sears, Galen Dively, Eric Olson, John M. Pleasants, Wai-Ki F. Lam, Richard L. Hellmich Oct 2001

Temporal And Spatial Overlap Between Monarch Larvae And Corn Pollen, Karen S. Oberhauser, Michelle D. Prysby, Heather R. Mattila, Diane E. Stanley-Horn, Mark K. Sears, Galen Dively, Eric Olson, John M. Pleasants, Wai-Ki F. Lam, Richard L. Hellmich

Entomology Publications

To assess the likelihood that monarch larvae will be exposed to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) pollen, we studied milkweed and monarch densities in habitats which comprise much of the land available to breeding monarchs, e.g., cornfields, cornfield edges, other agricultural fields, and nonagricultural areas, in four regions of the monarch breeding range. We found that monarchs use milkweed in cornfields throughout their breeding season, and that per plant densities are as high or higher in agricultural habitats as in nonagricultural habitats. As a result of the prevalence of agricultural land, most of the monarchs produced in the upper Midwest are ...


Mammals Of Fort A. P. Hill, Caroline County, Virginia And Vicinity, A. Scott Bellows, Joseph C. Mitchell, John F. Pagels, Heather N. Mansfield Oct 2001

Mammals Of Fort A. P. Hill, Caroline County, Virginia And Vicinity, A. Scott Bellows, Joseph C. Mitchell, John F. Pagels, Heather N. Mansfield

Virginia Journal of Science

Fort A.P. Hill (APH) is a 30,329 ha military training installation (U.S. Army) located in the upper Coastal Plain of Caroline County, Virginia. It was formed in 1941 and named in honor of Civil War Confederate Lt. General Ambrose Powell Hill. The current landscape includes a mosaic of habitats that range from old fields to hardwood forests. Forty species of mammals are known to exist on or near the installation. These include one marsupial, five insectivores, 9 chiropterans, one lagomorph, 12 rodents, 10 carnivores, and one cervid. We have studied many of the species on APH since ...


Nou Spring Meeting Bird Count, 18 To 20 May, Camp Calvin Crest (Fremont) Sep 2001

Nou Spring Meeting Bird Count, 18 To 20 May, Camp Calvin Crest (Fremont)

Nebraska Bird Review

NOU Spring Meeting Bird Count

18 to 20 May, Camp Calvin Crest (Fremont)


Summer Field Report, June And July 2001, W. Ross Silcock Sep 2001

Summer Field Report, June And July 2001, W. Ross Silcock

Nebraska Bird Review

Jaeger at Lake McConaughy; the continuing advance of the Eurasian Collared-Dove; possible breeding or hybridization with Eurasian Collared-Dove of White-winged Dove at Kearney; a resurgence of Black-billed Cuckoos; breeding of Long-eared Owl in Knox County; hummingbirds (including Calliope) in the Panhandle; and interesting information on the Red Crossbills on the Pine Ridge.


Nebraska Bird Review Whole Issue September 2001 Volume 69 Number 3 Sep 2001

Nebraska Bird Review Whole Issue September 2001 Volume 69 Number 3

Nebraska Bird Review

Table of Contents

Summer Field Report, compiled by W. Ross Silcock................................. 106

Species Accounts................................. 108

Bird Hunts of Omaha Sportsmen's Clubs, 1858-1887
by J. E. Ducey .................................133

NOU Spring Meeting Bird Count .................................148

Analysis Of long-eared Owl (Asio Otus) Pellets From
Eastern Nebraska by Mahan, Mahan, and Sachtleben .................................152

A Poem by Shelly Clark .................................155


Analaysis Of Long-Eared Owl (Asio Otus) Pellets From Eastern Nebraska, Rachel D. Mahan, Emily C. Mahan, Brandon D. Sachtleben Sep 2001

Analaysis Of Long-Eared Owl (Asio Otus) Pellets From Eastern Nebraska, Rachel D. Mahan, Emily C. Mahan, Brandon D. Sachtleben

Nebraska Bird Review

A common way to determine the food habits of an owl is to analyze prey remains found within regurgitated pellets, called "owl pellets." We collected and analyzed owl pellets found under a Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) roost in eastern Nebraska as part of two grade school science fair projects. The results are presented here to add to the knowledge about the food habits of this species in Nebraska.


A Bird On The Shoreline, Shelly Clark Sep 2001

A Bird On The Shoreline, Shelly Clark

Nebraska Bird Review

A Bird on the Shoreline

My daughter tells me she doesn't believe in God.

Her words pour onto the supper table like milk spilling.

In measured silence

she waits for what I will say.

The evening news mumbles in the background,

dog scratching at the door.

I look out the window to September sky opening

its dark blue skirt of night. I tell her

the Piping plovers will be leaving soon, if they haven't already.

Asking her, do you remember the first time we saw them through binoculars,

on the broad sandbar new McConaughy?

You were eight or ...


Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review September 2001 Sep 2001

Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review September 2001

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Reyiew (http://rip.physics.unk.edu/NOU/) is published quarterly by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $14.00 in the United States; $18.00 for all foreign countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Prichard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.

Memberships in NOU (on a calendar year basis only): Active, $15 ...


Deletions In The 7a Orf Of Feline Coronavirus Associated With An Epidemic Of Feline Infectious Peritonitis, Melissa Kennedy, N Boedeker, P Gibbs, Stephen Kania Aug 2001

Deletions In The 7a Orf Of Feline Coronavirus Associated With An Epidemic Of Feline Infectious Peritonitis, Melissa Kennedy, N Boedeker, P Gibbs, Stephen Kania

Melissa A. Kennedy

A population of Persian cats experienced an epidemic of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) over 2 years. Twelve cases of FIP occurred in litters born during this period. Cats contracting FIP were all genetically related through the sire. Feline coronavirus (FCoV) genomic RNA was detected consistently in this study in biologic samples from adult cats, kittens suffering from FIP, and their siblings. Analysis of viral 7a/7b open reading frame (ORFs) were analyzed and revealed two distinct virus variants circulating in the population, one with an intact 7a ORF and one with two major deletions in the 7a ORF. The 7b ...


Managing A Complex Exotic Vegetation Program In Yellowstone National Park, Tom Olliff, Roy Renkin, Craig Mcclure, Paul Miller, Dave Price, Dan Reinhart, Jennifer Whipple Jul 2001

Managing A Complex Exotic Vegetation Program In Yellowstone National Park, Tom Olliff, Roy Renkin, Craig Mcclure, Paul Miller, Dave Price, Dan Reinhart, Jennifer Whipple

Western North American Naturalist

The number of documented exotic plants in Yellowstone National Park has increased from 85 known in 1986 to over 185 today. Exotic plants are substantially impacting the parks natural and cultural resources and are a high management priority. We have adopted an integrated weed management approach with regard to exotic vegetation, emphasizing prevention, education, early detection and eradication, control, and, to a lesser degree, monitoring. The program involves over 140 staff with program expenditures averaging approximately $190,000 annually. Prevention actions include requiring approved gravel on construction projects; banning hay in the backcountry and allowing transport of only certified weed-seed-free ...


End Matter, Vol. 61 No. 3 Jul 2001

End Matter, Vol. 61 No. 3

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


Biological Invasions—How Are They Affecting Us, And What Can We Do About Them?, Daniel Simberloff Jul 2001

Biological Invasions—How Are They Affecting Us, And What Can We Do About Them?, Daniel Simberloff

Western North American Naturalist

Nonindigenous species affect native ecosystems, communities, and populations in myriad ways, from plants (and a few animals) that overgrow entire communities, to plants and animals that hybridize individual native species to a sort of genetic extinction. Further, nonindigenous species sometimes interact to worsen each others impact. These impacts are commonly seen in national parks throughout the United States. The key policy change required to alleviate this threat is a shift from blacklists of prohibited species and a presumption of harmlessness to combinations of white and blacklists and a presumption that any species may be damaging. This new guiding philosophy must ...


Front Matter, Vol. 61 No. 3 Jul 2001

Front Matter, Vol. 61 No. 3

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


The Membrane-Bound Intestinal Enzymes Of Waxwings And Thrushes: Adaptive And Functional Implications Of Patterns Of Enzyme Activity, M. C. Witmer, Carlos Martinez Del Rio Jul 2001

The Membrane-Bound Intestinal Enzymes Of Waxwings And Thrushes: Adaptive And Functional Implications Of Patterns Of Enzyme Activity, M. C. Witmer, Carlos Martinez Del Rio

Zoology Faculty Publications

Cedar waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum) feed predominantly on fruits that are rich in simple sugars and low in nitrogen, supplementing this diet with arthropod prey during the summer months as well as flowers and tree sap in springtime. In contrast, thrushes feed extensively on fatty, protein-rich invertebrate prey, supplemented with sugary and lipid-rich fruits. Simple sugars and fats are digested and/or absorbed by distinctly different physiological mechanisms, which suggests the possibility of contrasting digestive strategies in animals specialized to diets containing one of these two energy sources. In this study, we quantified enzymatic activity of three membrane-bound intestinal enzymes of ...


Evolution Of A Scientific Meeting: Eighty Annual Meetings Of The American Society Of Mammalogists, 1919-2000, Hugh H. Genoways, Patricia W. Freeman Jun 2001

Evolution Of A Scientific Meeting: Eighty Annual Meetings Of The American Society Of Mammalogists, 1919-2000, Hugh H. Genoways, Patricia W. Freeman

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

The American Society of Mammalogists has held 80 annual meetings between 1919 and 2000. These meetings have been held in 32 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Canada, and Mexico. At least 86 people have served as the chair or co-chair of the Local Committee planning the meetings. The number of technical presentations has grown from a low of 17 in 1921 to 340 in 1994. Symposia were an early feature of annual meetings but did not become a regular feature until 1971. Poster presentations were introduced in 1979 and reached a high of 195 posters at the 1994 ...


Comments On Nebraska's Falconiform And Stringiform Bird Fauna, Paul A. Johnsgard Jun 2001

Comments On Nebraska's Falconiform And Stringiform Bird Fauna, Paul A. Johnsgard

Nebraska Bird Review

Owing to a lack of long-term survey data, determining whether Nebraska's raptor numbers are stable, increasing, or decreasing is difficult. Unlike our relatively well-monitored gamebirds, no regular surveys have been performed, and raptors barely register on the state's Breeding Bird Surveys or Christmas Bird Counts, owing to their relative rarity. However, a few data-points of interest do exist, which might be worth summarizing.

In one of the first multi-year surveys of Sandhills avifauna, H. Elliott McClure (1966) summarized raptor abundance data based on three years of study in the Nebraska Sandhills (1 941-1 944). During that period, he ...


1999 (Eleventh) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Joel G. Jorgensen Jun 2001

1999 (Eleventh) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Joel G. Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

The functions and methods of the NOU Records Committee are described in its bylaws (NOU Records Committee 1986). The committee's purpose is to provide a procedure for documenting unusual bird sightings and to establish a list of all documented birds for Nebraska. THE OFFICIAL LIST OF THE BIRDS OF NEBRASKA was first published in 1988 (NOU Records Committee 1988) and has been appended nine times (Mollhoff 1989, Grenon 1990, Grenon 1991, Gubanyi 1996a, Gubanyi 1996b, Gubanyi 1996c, Brogie 1997, Brogie 1998, Brogie 1999). An update of the OFFICIAL LIST OF THE BIRDS OF NEBRASKA was first published in 1997 ...