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Zoology

2000

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Articles 1 - 30 of 104

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Development Of An Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (Elisa) For The Diagnosis Of Ophidian Paramyxovirus (Opv), Stephen Kania, Melissa Kennedy, N Nowlin, V Diderrich, Edward Ramsay Mar 2012

Development Of An Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (Elisa) For The Diagnosis Of Ophidian Paramyxovirus (Opv), Stephen Kania, Melissa Kennedy, N Nowlin, V Diderrich, Edward Ramsay

Stephen A Kania

No abstract provided.


Observations On Small Mammals Recovered From Owl Pellets From Nebraska, Jeffrey J. Huebschman, Hugh H. Genoways, Patricia W. Freeman, Joseph A. Gubanyi Dec 2000

Observations On Small Mammals Recovered From Owl Pellets From Nebraska, Jeffrey J. Huebschman, Hugh H. Genoways, Patricia W. Freeman, Joseph A. Gubanyi

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

Mammalian remains from owl pellet material collected in 24 Nebraska counties were examined. A total of 1262 individual mammals was identified from all owl pellet material and included 19 identifiable species and 21 total genera. The most commonly consumed prey by owls across the state were Microtus (41% of identifiable prey material), followed by Peromyscus (18%), and Reithrodontomys (11%). Significant locality information for the northern grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster), the southern bog lemming (Synaptomys cooperi), and the meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are reported.


Ecogeographic Aspects Of Greater Prairie-Chicken Leks In Southeastern Nebraska, Paul A. Johnsgard Dec 2000

Ecogeographic Aspects Of Greater Prairie-Chicken Leks In Southeastern Nebraska, Paul A. Johnsgard

Nebraska Bird Review

An analysis of the distribution of 104 Greater Prairie-chicken leks in Pawnee and Johnson counties indicates that the birds favor using those mile-square sections having no more than two dwellings per section, ones that are located at least two miles from the nearest town, and at least a half-mile from the nearest lek. Relationships with the nearest water were not clear, but most leks were located at least a half-mile from it, perhaps reflecting a general avoidance of heavy cover during the display season.


Subscription And Organization Information [December 2000] Dec 2000

Subscription And Organization Information [December 2000]

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $14.00 in the United States; $18.00 for all foreign countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Prichard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.

Memberships in NOU (on a calendar year basis only): Active, $15.00; Sustaining, $25.00; Student, $10 ...


Nebraska Bird Review (December 2000) 68(4), Whole Issue Dec 2000

Nebraska Bird Review (December 2000) 68(4), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Fall Field Report, August–November, 2000 ... 142

Species Accounts ... 144

First Record of an Arctic Tern for Nebraska ... 176

Mist Netting at Oliver State Recreation Area ... 177

Ecogeographic Aspects of Greater Prairie-Chicken Leks in Southeastern Nebraska ... 179

Index [for Volume 68: 1–4] ... 184


Behavioral, Neurophysiological And Evolutionary Perspectives On Unihemispheric Sleep, Niels Rattenborg, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima Nov 2000

Behavioral, Neurophysiological And Evolutionary Perspectives On Unihemispheric Sleep, Niels Rattenborg, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima

Charles J. Amlaner

Several animals mitigate the fundamental conflict between sleep and wakefulness by engaging in unihemispheric sleep, a unique state during which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other remains awake. Among mammals, unihemispheric sleep is restricted to aquatic species (Cetaceans, cared seals and manatees). in contrast to mammals, unihemispheric sleep is widespread in birds, and may even occur in reptiles. Unihemispheric sleep allows surfacing to breathe in aquatic mammals and predator detection in birds. Despite the apparent utility in being able to sleep unihemispherically, very few mammals sleep in this manner. This is particularly interesting since the reptilian ancestors to mammals ...


Obituary: Elmer Clea Birney, 1940-2000, Hugh H. Genoways, Carleton J. Phillips, Jerry R. Choate, Robert S. Sikes, Kristin M. Kramer Nov 2000

Obituary: Elmer Clea Birney, 1940-2000, Hugh H. Genoways, Carleton J. Phillips, Jerry R. Choate, Robert S. Sikes, Kristin M. Kramer

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

On 11 June 2000, Dr. Elmer C. Birney unexpectedly passed away from cardiac arrest suffered while outside caring for his cattle at his home in Blaine, Minnesota. One of his former students, Robert Timm, probably best expressed the immediate reaction of his family and many friends: ‘‘He was too young and in too good of health to be gone so soon.’’ At the time of his death, Elmer was Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, the Curator of Mammals at the Bell Museum of Natural History, and Director of Graduate Studies of the program in Ecology, Evolution ...


Front Matter, Vol. 60 No. 4 Oct 2000

Front Matter, Vol. 60 No. 4

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


End Matter, Vol. 60 No. 4 Oct 2000

End Matter, Vol. 60 No. 4

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


C3 And C4 Species Changes Identified By Δ13C Values Of Soil Organic Matter In A Colorado Prairie, Penelope Sinton, Tim Seastedt, Barry Bennett, Carl Bock, Jane Bock Oct 2000

C3 And C4 Species Changes Identified By Δ13C Values Of Soil Organic Matter In A Colorado Prairie, Penelope Sinton, Tim Seastedt, Barry Bennett, Carl Bock, Jane Bock

Western North American Naturalist

We measured carbon isotope signatures (δ13C) from 0–10 cm and 10–20 cm soil depth intervals for grassland soils near Boulder, Colorado. These grasslands included tall-, short-, and mixed-grass prairies that were grazed, ungrazed, or hayed. Soils exhibited δ13C signatures consistent with observations that current sites are a mix of C3 and C4 species, with C3 plants more abundant in mixed-grass than in native tall- or shortgrass prairies. The δ13C signatures were not significantly different for grassland types; however, management treatments (grazing, no grazing, haying) significantly influenced changes in soil ...


Small Mammal Communities In Riparian And Upland Habitats On The Upper Coastal Plain Of Virginia, A. Scott Bellows, Joseph C. Mitchell Oct 2000

Small Mammal Communities In Riparian And Upland Habitats On The Upper Coastal Plain Of Virginia, A. Scott Bellows, Joseph C. Mitchell

Virginia Journal of Science

We compared small mammal communities between riparian (stream corridor) and nearby upland habitats in a hardwood forest ecosystem on Fort A.P. Hill, Caroline County, Virginia. We used a combination of small-scale drift fence/pitfall trap arrays and snap traps to capture small mammals during April – October 1998, with an additional winter sample in January 1999. We captured seven small mammal species at 14 sites (7 pairs). Numbers of species were not significantly different between habitat types. Bray-Curtis polar ordinations showed that plant and small mammal community compositions were similar in upland sites and that these communities were most varied ...


Observations On Amphibians And Reptiles In Burned And Unburned Forests On The Upper Coastal Plain Of Virginia, Joseph C. Mitchell Oct 2000

Observations On Amphibians And Reptiles In Burned And Unburned Forests On The Upper Coastal Plain Of Virginia, Joseph C. Mitchell

Virginia Journal of Science

I evaluate the results of a short-term study on the effects of prescribed burning on terrestrial amphibians and reptiles on Fort A.P. Hill, Caroline County, Virginia. Six species of amphibians and reptiles were observed in unburned sites and eight species were observed in burned sites. More individual amphibians (46) were observed in unburned stands than in burned stands (15). Adults of two species (Bufo americanus, Plethodon cinereus) were found dead under logs in the still smoldering prescribed burn. The results of this study suggest that prescribed burning may have some negative effects on amphibians and reptiles. Because the literature ...


Nebraska Bird Review (September 2000) 68(3), Whole Issue Sep 2000

Nebraska Bird Review (September 2000) 68(3), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Summer Field Report ... 106

Species Accounts ... 107

Review of the Breeding Status of Pinyon Jay in Nebraska ... 126

Book Review [Birds of the Untamed West by James E. Ducey] ... 131

Historic Birds of Lincoln's Salt Basin Wetlands and Nine-Mile Prairie ... 132

Virginia's Warblers in Kimball County ... 137


Subscription And Organization Information [September 2000] Sep 2000

Subscription And Organization Information [September 2000]

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $14.00 in the United States; $18.00 for all foreign countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Prichard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.

Memberships in NOU (on a calendar year basis only): Active, $15.00; Sustaining, $25.00; Student, $10 ...


Los Anfibios Del Monumento Natural Barro Colorado, Parque Nacional Soberania Y Areas Adyacentes, Rafael O. De Sá Sep 2000

Los Anfibios Del Monumento Natural Barro Colorado, Parque Nacional Soberania Y Areas Adyacentes, Rafael O. De Sá

Biology Faculty Publications

This book focuses on the batrachofauna of Barro Colorado Nature Monument. Soberania National Park and adjacent areas. It complements other recent publications on Neotropical amphibians such as those by Rodriguez and Duellman ( 1994) on Peru, Achaval and Olmos (1995) on Uruguay, and Meyer and Foster (1996) on Belize. The goal of these books is to reach a wider audience than the more technical batrachofaunal summaries-e.g., Frogs of Boracéia (Heyer 1990). Amphibians of Argentina (Cei 1985), and Frogs of the Genus Eleutherodactylus in Western Ecuador (Lynch and Duellman 1997). These geographically focused guides are especially useful to students, amateur biologists ...


Eye States And Postures Of The Western Fence Lizard (Sceloporus Occidentalis), With Special Reference To Asynchronous Eye Closure And Behavioral Sleep, Christian Mathews, Charles Amlaner Aug 2000

Eye States And Postures Of The Western Fence Lizard (Sceloporus Occidentalis), With Special Reference To Asynchronous Eye Closure And Behavioral Sleep, Christian Mathews, Charles Amlaner

Charles J. Amlaner

No abstract provided.


Front Matter, Vol. 60 No. 3 Aug 2000

Front Matter, Vol. 60 No. 3

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


End Matter, Vol. 60 No. 3 Aug 2000

End Matter, Vol. 60 No. 3

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


Life History Variation In Recently Established Populations Of Western Mosquitofish (Gambusia Affinis), Craig A. Stockwell, Gary L. Vinyard Aug 2000

Life History Variation In Recently Established Populations Of Western Mosquitofish (Gambusia Affinis), Craig A. Stockwell, Gary L. Vinyard

Western North American Naturalist

We report life history characteristics for 4 recently established populations of western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis). Mosquitofish from thermally stable habitats, Bonham and Garrett, were characterized by maturity at large sizes, high fat reserves, and large embryos. In contrast, females from a thermally unstable habitat, Wabuska, matured at small sizes and had low fat reserves and small embryos. Females from Parker, a site with no appreciable thermal input, matured at intermediate sizes and had low fat reserves as well as large embryos. These populations shared a common ancestor in 1937; therefore, these results suggest either phenotypic plasticity or rapid evolution.


Experimental Analysis Of An Early Life-History Stage: Selection On Size Of Hatchling Turtles, Fredric J. Janzen, John K. Tucker, Gary L. Paukstis Aug 2000

Experimental Analysis Of An Early Life-History Stage: Selection On Size Of Hatchling Turtles, Fredric J. Janzen, John K. Tucker, Gary L. Paukstis

Zoology and Genetics Publications

Life-history evolution in short-lived organisms has been investigated extensively, but little is known empirically about the causes of the different life-history strategies of long-lived organisms. To explore this issue, we conducted experiments to evaluate natural selection acting on key traits during an important life-history stage of the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans). We reared eggs from 56 females in a seminatural common environment and released 356 of the resulting hatchlings in four replicates at a natural nesting area to assess offspring recapture probability as a measure of survivorship during the post-emergence migration. Larger body size of hatchling turtles was ...


Nestling Tree Swallow (Tachycineta Bicolor) Diets In An Upland Old Field In Western Michigan, Matthew E. Johnson, Michael P. Lombardo Jul 2000

Nestling Tree Swallow (Tachycineta Bicolor) Diets In An Upland Old Field In Western Michigan, Matthew E. Johnson, Michael P. Lombardo

Peer Reviewed Publications

We collected and identified 1852 prey items from 89 boluses delivered to 62 nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) at 14 nests in an upland old field in western Michigan. We found that 90.8% of nestling diets was insects from the Orders Diptera, Homoptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera. We also found clam and snail shells in boluses. Over the most common brood sizes of 4-6 nestlings, brood size was inversely proportional to the number of items per bolus delivered to nestlings although mean dry and mean organic weight of boluses did not differ. Bolus composition was not influenced by weather conditions ...


An Ultrastructural Survey Of The Nuchal Glands Of Rhabdophis Tigrinus (Serpentes: Colubridae), Kathleen A. Roberts Jul 2000

An Ultrastructural Survey Of The Nuchal Glands Of Rhabdophis Tigrinus (Serpentes: Colubridae), Kathleen A. Roberts

Biological Sciences Theses & Dissertations

Rhabdophis tigrinus, an Asian natricine snake, possesses a series of integumentary glands located in the nuchal skin. Previous studies indicated that the nuchal glands are of mesodermal origin, contain cardiac steroids analogous to bufotoxins found in the parotoid glands of toads, which are included in the snake's diet. The nuchal glands are defensive in function. Preliminary histological studies revealed differences in quality of the gland tissue compared to previous studies, and difference in fixation techniques were suspected. Seven specimens of R. tigrinus were fixed by perfusion using a conservative fixation process standard for electron microscopy. The nuchal gland series ...


Comparative Systematics Of Subterranean Amphipod Crustaceans In The Families Crangonyctidae And Bogidiellidae, Stefan Koenemann Jul 2000

Comparative Systematics Of Subterranean Amphipod Crustaceans In The Families Crangonyctidae And Bogidiellidae, Stefan Koenemann

Biological Sciences Theses & Dissertations

The research project presented in this doctoral dissertation deals with the systematics of two different taxonomic groups of subterranean amphipods (Crustacea). Therefore, rather than being a single project, this study is divided into several sub-projects. Altogether, the chapters for the sub-projects are composed of five publications. An introductory chapter and a summarizing discussion are added to provide a structural unit for the collection of papers and to compare the results of the individual projects.

The thesis investigates the systematics of the amphipod families Bogidiellidae Hertzog, 1936, and Crangonyctidae Bousfield, 1973. Based on descriptive taxonomy according to modern standards, revisions are ...


Macroevolution In Microchiroptera: Recoupling Morphology And Ecology With Phylogeny, Patricia W. Freeman Jun 2000

Macroevolution In Microchiroptera: Recoupling Morphology And Ecology With Phylogeny, Patricia W. Freeman

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

No family of mammals has undergone a greater adaptive radiation than phyllostomid bats. Phylogeny combined with eco-morphological considerations of trophic structures can help understand this adaptive radiation and the evolution of Microchiroptera. Microchiropteran bats are overwhelmingly insectivorous, and constraints within the morphospace of insectivory have produced a dynamic equilibrium in bat morphologies that has persisted for 60 million years. The ability to eat fruit may be the key synapomorphy that allowed phyllostomids to escape insectivore morphospace and diversify. Although many phyllostomids have changed greatly, others that have maintained insectivory have changed little, which is equally remarkable.


Subscription And Organization Information [June 2000] Jun 2000

Subscription And Organization Information [June 2000]

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $14.00 in the United States; $18.00 for all foreign countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $S.OO elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Prichard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514. Memberships in NOU (on a calendar year basis only): Active, $15.00; Sustaining, $25.00; Student, $10 ...


Nebraska Bird Review (June 2000) 68(2), Whole Issue Jun 2000

Nebraska Bird Review (June 2000) 68(2), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Review of the Breeding Status of Lewis's Woodpecker in Nebraska ... 50

Spring Field Report, March to May 2000 ... 55

Species Accounts ... 57

NOU Spring Count ... 81

Yellow-billed Loon at Lake McConaughy ... 88

A Century of Breeding Birds in Nebraska ... 89

Tufted Duck at Lake Ogallala: First Record for Nebraska ... 102


Front Matter, Vol. 60 No. 2 May 2000

Front Matter, Vol. 60 No. 2

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.


A Gis Model To Predict The Location Of Fossil Packrat (Neotoma) Middens In Central Nevada, Scott A. Mensing, Robert G. Elston Jr., Gary L. Raines, Robin J. Tausch, Cheryl L. Nowak May 2000

A Gis Model To Predict The Location Of Fossil Packrat (Neotoma) Middens In Central Nevada, Scott A. Mensing, Robert G. Elston Jr., Gary L. Raines, Robin J. Tausch, Cheryl L. Nowak

Western North American Naturalist

Fossil packrat (Neotoma) middens provide an important source of paleoecologic data in the arid West. This study describes and tests a predictive GIS model that uses the eights-of-evidence method for determining areas with a high probability of containing fossil middens in central Nevada. Model variables included geology, elevation, and aspect. Geology was found to be the most important variable tested. We produced a map of 4 probability classes validated by field-checking 21 randomly selected 1-km2 sites throughout the study area. Our high-probability category reduced the search area to only 3.5% of the total study area. Fossil middens were ...


Importance Of Migrating Salmon Smolt In Ring-Billed (Larus Delawarensis) And California Gull (L. Californicus) Diets Near Priest Rapids Dam, Washington, Darryl L. York, John L. Cummings, John E. Steuber, Patricia A. Pochop, Christi A. Yoder May 2000

Importance Of Migrating Salmon Smolt In Ring-Billed (Larus Delawarensis) And California Gull (L. Californicus) Diets Near Priest Rapids Dam, Washington, Darryl L. York, John L. Cummings, John E. Steuber, Patricia A. Pochop, Christi A. Yoder

Western North American Naturalist

Ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and California Gulls (L. californicus) have been implicated in depredations on migrating salmon smolt in the Columbia River. As part of a gull management program conducted in 1995 and 1996, we collected L. delawarensis (n = 120) and L. californicus (n = 45) near Priest Rapids Dam, Washington, and analyzed stomach contents to determine food habits and thus the importance of fish in gull diets. Percent volume measurements and index of relative importance rankings suggested a greater reliance on fish by L. californicus than by L. delawarensis. Peak percent consumption of fish by both species occurred in May, coinciding ...


End Matter, Vol. 60 No. 2 May 2000

End Matter, Vol. 60 No. 2

Western North American Naturalist

No abstract provided.