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Zoology

1999

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

1998 (Tenth) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Mark A. Brogie Dec 1999

1998 (Tenth) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Mark A. Brogie

Nebraska Bird Review

The functions and methods of the NOU Records Committee are described in its bylaws (NOU Records Committee 1986). The committee's purpose is to provide a procedure for documenting unusual bird sightings and to establish a list of all documented birds for Nebraska. THE OFFICIAL LIST OF THE BIRDS OF NEBRASKA was first published in 1988 (NOU Records Committee 1988) and has been appended eight times (Mollhoff 1989, Grenon 1990, 1991, Gubanyi 1996a, 1996b, 1996c, Brogie 1997, Brogie 1998). An update of THE OFFICIAL LIST OF THE BIRDS OF NEBRASKA was last published in 1997 (NOU Records Committee 1997).

This ...


Fall Field Report, August To November, 1999, W. Ross Silcock Dec 1999

Fall Field Report, August To November, 1999, W. Ross Silcock

Nebraska Bird Review

This season, partly due to the departure of my co-writer Joel Jorgensen and partly due to mental aging, I have shortened the species accounts by including only data that add to our current knowledge base. I will not routinely list early and late dates and peak counts for each species unless they are significant; readers should refer to past issues of NBR for guidelines as to what are early or late dates and high counts. Observers are, however, urged to report early and late dates and high counts of all migrant species; it is difficult to know if a sighting ...


Index To Volume 67 Dec 1999

Index To Volume 67

Nebraska Bird Review

Index to Volume 67


Nebraska Bird Review (December 1999) 67(4), Whole Issue Dec 1999

Nebraska Bird Review (December 1999) 67(4), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Fall Field Report, August to November, 1999 ... 118

Species Accounts ... 120

Kids on Science (Humor) ... 139

1998 (Tenth) Report of the NOU Records Committee ... 141

Index for Volume 67: 1–4 ... 152


Table Of Contents And Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1999) 67(4) Dec 1999

Table Of Contents And Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1999) 67(4)

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $14.00 in the United States; $18.00 for all foreign countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Prichard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.

Memberships in NOU (on a calendar year basis only): Active, $15.00; Sustaining, $25.00; Student, $10 ...


Kids On Science Dec 1999

Kids On Science

Nebraska Bird Review

The beguiling ideas about science quoted here were gleaned from essays, exams, and classroom discussions. Most were from 5th and 6th graders.


A Comparative Gene Map Of The Horse (Equus Caballus), Alexandre R. Caetano, Yow-Ling Shiue, Leslie A. Lyons, Stephen J. O'Brien, Thomas F. Laughlin, Ann T. Bowling, James D. Murray Dec 1999

A Comparative Gene Map Of The Horse (Equus Caballus), Alexandre R. Caetano, Yow-Ling Shiue, Leslie A. Lyons, Stephen J. O'Brien, Thomas F. Laughlin, Ann T. Bowling, James D. Murray

Biology Faculty Articles

A comparative gene map of the horse genome composed of 127 loci was assembled based on the new assignment of 68 equine type I loci and on data published previously. PCR primers based on consensus gene sequences conserved across mammalian species were used to amplify markers for assigning 68 equine type I loci to 27 horse synteny groups established previously with a horse-mouse somatic cell hybrid panel (SCHP, UC Davis). This increased the number of coding genes mapped to the horse genome by over 2-fold and allowed refinements of the comparative mapping data available for this species. In conjunction with ...


Three Poems, Roy Scheele Sep 1999

Three Poems, Roy Scheele

Nebraska Bird Review

At the Kitchen Window

Prodigal

The Patience of the Hawk


Cooperative Whooping Crane Tracking Project March 1999-May 1999 Sep 1999

Cooperative Whooping Crane Tracking Project March 1999-May 1999

Nebraska Bird Review

A peak population of 182 (164 adult/subadult and 18 juvenile) whooping cranes was reported at Aransas during the winter of 1998-99. An adult plumaged whooping crane, which wintered with sandhill cranes about 90 miles northeast of Aransas in Fort Bend County, was the record 183rd bird in the wintering flock. No birds are known to have been lost at Aransas during the winter. A 1986 colormarked female with a broken leg, last observed at Quivira NWR on December 29, 1998, was not reported during the spring migration, and is assumed to be dead. An estimated 183 whooping cranes migrated ...


Summer Field Report, June To July, 1999, W. Ross Silcock Sep 1999

Summer Field Report, June To July, 1999, W. Ross Silcock

Nebraska Bird Review

First of all, I want to thank Joel Jorgensen for helping write these reports for the last few years. Joel has decided to spend his limited free time on Records Committee matters; he is currently Chairman. Over the last few years, Joel has made significant contributions to Nebraska ornithology, particularly through his! meticulous counts of shorebirds in the Rainwater Basin.

This season proved interesting in terms of ranges of breeding birds, as discussed in the accounts. See, for example, Little Blue Heron, the dOWitchers. Black-billed Magpie, White-breasted Nuthatch, Sedge Wren, and the towhees. There seems to be an increasing number ...


Comparing The Tadpoles Of Hyla Geographica And Hyla Semilineata, Anne D'Heursel, Rafael O. De Sá Sep 1999

Comparing The Tadpoles Of Hyla Geographica And Hyla Semilineata, Anne D'Heursel, Rafael O. De Sá

Biology Faculty Publications

External morphology, internal oral anatomy, and chondrocranial anatomy were examined for tadpoles of Hyla geographica from the Amazon rainforest, Brazil, and Hyla semilineata from the Atlantic rainforest, Brazil. Here, we provide morphological larval data to help diagnose these closely related species. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of buccal morphology showed the most distinctive features between these species: the distance between the lingual papillae in the buccal floor of H. geographica is three times greater than that distance in H. semilineata, and the relative size of the lingual papillae in H. geographica is less than half their size in H. semilineata. Although ...


The Ultraviolet Birds Of Nebraska, Paul A. Johnsgard Sep 1999

The Ultraviolet Birds Of Nebraska, Paul A. Johnsgard

Nebraska Bird Review

That the visual range of at least some birds extends into the ultraviolet region has been known since the early 1970s, when it was first discovered in hummingbirds and pigeons. The ultraviolet region is that energy consisting of light waves shorter than Violet, and thus beyond human perception. Although UV perception has long been recognized to occur in many insects and other invertebrate groups, scientists had doubted that either birds or mammals have this ability. Instead, it was generally assumed that the vertebrate cornea provides a protective block to ultraviolet waves, perhaps because UV energy can do damage to the ...


Table Of Contents And Masthead, From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1999) 67(3) Sep 1999

Table Of Contents And Masthead, From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1999) 67(3)

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $14.00 in the United States; $18.00 for all foreign countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Prichard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.

Memberships in NOU (on a calendar year basis only): Active, $15.00; Sustaining, $25.00; Student, $10 ...


Nebraska Bird Review (September 1999) 67(3), Whole Issue Sep 1999

Nebraska Bird Review (September 1999) 67(3), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Summer Field Report, June to July, 1999 ... 86

Species Accounts ... 88

The Ultraviolet Birds of Nebraska ... 103

Cooperative Whooping Crane Tracking Project (March 1999–May 1999) ... 105

1998 Nebraska Nesting Report ... 108

Three Poems by Roy Scheele ... 114


1998 Nebraska Nesting Report, Wayne J. Mollhoff Sep 1999

1998 Nebraska Nesting Report, Wayne J. Mollhoff

Nebraska Bird Review

Following a hiatus of nearly a decade, this report on the nesting birds of Nebraska reinstates a Nebraska Bird Review tradition that began with an anonymous compilation (apparently by the editor) of the notes from two observers in the 1955 breeding season (Anonymous 1956). By 1965, with the inception of the Cornell Nest Record Card Program, data was collected on standardized cards, with the completed cards being forwarded to Cornell University in New York.

I accepted responsibility for the program several years ago; but by mutual agreement with the/Nebraska Ornithologists' Union leadership, I have delayed work until the Nebraska ...


Review Of Swallow Summer, Carol M. Vleck Sep 1999

Review Of Swallow Summer, Carol M. Vleck

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

The field season of 1995 (early May through late July) in western Nebraska is described in this book by the leading expert on cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) behavior. This nontechnical introduction to the natural history of a colonial swallow was written for those who are interested in natural history or how field work is done. Brown's stated goals are to describe the challenges and satisfaction of long-term field work and to "tell the cliff swallow's story" (p xi). The book reads as part field notes (daily weather conditions, how many birds he caught and where), part personal diary ...


The Cyanogenic Glycoside Amygdalin Does Not Deter Consumption Of Ripe Fruit By Cedar Waxwings, H. M. Struempf, J. E. Schondube, Carlos Martinez Del Rio Jul 1999

The Cyanogenic Glycoside Amygdalin Does Not Deter Consumption Of Ripe Fruit By Cedar Waxwings, H. M. Struempf, J. E. Schondube, Carlos Martinez Del Rio

Zoology Faculty Publications

Cyanogenic glycosides are common secondary compounds in ripe fruits that are dispersed by birds. These substances are toxic to some mammals. We examined the repellent effect of amygdalin, a cyanogenic glycoside, on Cedar Waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum). Amygdalin did not reduce food ingestion in Cedar Waxwings, even at relatively high concentrations. In addition, these birds did not exhibit preference for amygdalin-free over amygdalin-containing fruit. Cedar Waxwings given artificial food that contained four times the amount of amygdalin found in some wild fruits ingested the equivalent of 5.5 times the oral lethal dose for rats in 4 h without exhibiting any ...


Estructura Del Condrocráneo Y Esqueleto Visceral De Larvas De Pseudis Minuta (Anura, Pseudidae, E. O. Lavilla, Rafael O. De Sá Jun 1999

Estructura Del Condrocráneo Y Esqueleto Visceral De Larvas De Pseudis Minuta (Anura, Pseudidae, E. O. Lavilla, Rafael O. De Sá

Biology Faculty Publications

The chondrocranium and visceral skeleton of Pseudis minuta tadpoles are described, based on a series of five larvae in stages 31 - 35 of Gosner (1960). Among their striking characters are the presence of peculiar articular surfaces between cornua trabeculae and suprarostral cartilage, the incomplete development of the orbital cartilage, the high fenestration of the floor of the cavum cranii, the fusion of posterior foramina, and the fusion of spicules 3 and 4 in the hyobranchial skeleton.


Book Review: "Swallow Summer" By Charles R. Brown, Linda R. Brown Jun 1999

Book Review: "Swallow Summer" By Charles R. Brown, Linda R. Brown

Nebraska Bird Review

Swallow Summer is a first-person, day-to-day account of Charles and Mary Bomberger Browns' fourteenth field season studying Cliff Swallows in western Nebraska. This story also concerns the three bright undergraduate field assistants who shared the experience of the summer of 1995. Charles communicates their discoveries of Cliff Swallow colony behavior in an everyday conversational manner. It was easy for me to catch the excitement they feel in "discovering the questions." I felt their wonder when as this very cold late breeding season slowly progressed, these researchers discovered that indeed many of the swallows were not breeding at all. This rather ...


Clark's Nutcracker At Lake Mcconaughy, Stephen J. Dinsmore Jun 1999

Clark's Nutcracker At Lake Mcconaughy, Stephen J. Dinsmore

Nebraska Bird Review

On 1 November 1998 I observed a Clark's Nutcracker along the north shore of Lake McConaughy in Keith County. Specifically, the bird was along the road of the Cedar Vue Recreation Area, just east of the main boat ramp. I studied and photographed the bird from 11:32 to 11:50 a.m. I was driving along the entrance road to Cedar Vue when I spotted a bird perched in a dead tree. As I approached the tree, I was thinking about stopping when the bird suddenly took flight. The flight silhouette resembled that of a flicker, although the ...


Neotropic Cormorant At Sutherland Reservoir, Stephen J. Dinsmore Jun 1999

Neotropic Cormorant At Sutherland Reservoir, Stephen J. Dinsmore

Nebraska Bird Review

On 2 May, 1998, I observed a Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) at Sutherland Reservoir in Lincoln County, Nebraska. When I arrived at the lake, I noticed a large number of gulls and cormorants resting on some dead logs near the northwest end of the lake. I scanned the cormorants several times and kept returning to one cormorant that seemed smaller than the nearby Double-crested Cormorants. The bird was sleeping, so size was the only mark I could see well. I studied the bird from 1:54 to 2:20 p.m. I estimated the body was at least 25% smaller ...


Nou Fall Field Days Count, 1998; May Namc Count, 1999 Jun 1999

Nou Fall Field Days Count, 1998; May Namc Count, 1999

Nebraska Bird Review

The NOU count during Fall Field Days, October 16 through 18, focused on areas in and around the Nebraska National Forest and includes reports from 5 counties: Forest, Blaine, Brown, Cherry, and Thomas. This year's species count, owing in part to inclement weather, registered only 92, far behind the previous year's NOU Fall Field Days record of 122 species.

The North American Migration Count (NAMC) for Pierce County is also included in this report. A total of twelve people in five parties took part in this year's count. The count registered one hour walked and 380 miles ...


Roseate Spoonbill In Otoe County, Stephen J. Dinsmore Jun 1999

Roseate Spoonbill In Otoe County, Stephen J. Dinsmore

Nebraska Bird Review

On 5 August 1997, W. Ross Silcock and I were birding the heron roost at the Waubonsie Wildlife Area in Fremont County, Iowa. We were hoping to see the Roseate Spoonbill I found there on 4 August (see Dinsmore 1998), and thought there might be a chance it would fly into Nebraska upon leaving the roost. At 5:53 a.m., the bird left the roost. It flew directly over us (in Iowa) and headed to the north with a Great Egret. We continued to watch the bird as it gained altitude and was joined by a second Great Egret ...


Table Of Contents And Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review June 1999 Jun 1999

Table Of Contents And Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review June 1999

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $14.00 in the United States; $18.00 for all foreign countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Prichard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.

Memberships in NOU (on a calendar year basis only): Active, $15.00; Sustaining, $25.00; Student, $10 ...


Nebraska Bird Review (June 1999) 67(2), Whole Issue Jun 1999

Nebraska Bird Review (June 1999) 67(2), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Spring Field Report, March to May 1999 ... 42

Species Accounts ... 44

Book Review by Linda R. Brown of Swallow Summer ... 71

Neotropic Cormorant at Sutherland Reservoir ... 72

NOU Fall Field Days Count, 1998; May NAMC Count, 1999 ... 73

Clark’s Nutcracker at Lake McConaughy ... 79

Roseate Spoonbill in Otoe County ... 80

Red-throated Loon at Lake McConaughy ... 81

Two Poems by Don Welch and Drawings by Mark Sanders ... 82


Red-Throated Loon At Lake Mcconaughy, Stephen J. Dinsmore Jun 1999

Red-Throated Loon At Lake Mcconaughy, Stephen J. Dinsmore

Nebraska Bird Review

On 8 May 1998 I observed a Red-throated Loon at Lake McConaughy in Keith County, Nebraska. I was scanning Arthur Bay when I spotted a small loon swimming with several Western Grebes. I immediately recognized the bird as a Red-throated Loon in basic plumage. I studied and photographed the bird from 2:25 to 3:13 p.m. The bird was slightly larger and shorter-necked than a Western Grebe. The plumage was quite plain. The throat, cheek, foreneck, and underparts were white. The forehead, crown, nape, mantle, and wings were dark gray with a few pale spots on the mantle ...


Spring Field Report, March To May 1999, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen Jun 1999

Spring Field Report, March To May 1999, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

This spring proved an exciting season for several reasons. For warbler fans, it described a dream with lots of birds to look at and a rather incredible species count (for anywhere) of no fewer than 381 Many "eastern" warblers were found westward, especially at "islands" of habitat such as the Geneva Cemetery and similar spots just beyond the western edge of the original eastern woodland region, as well as the Panhandle. For rarity counters, spring included no fewer than 4 first state records: Glossy Ibis, Gray Flycatcher, Black-throated Gray Warbler, and Brambling. We make here a special note that the ...


Two Poems: The Hawk [And] Baltimore Oriole, Don Welch, Mark Emil Sanders Jun 1999

Two Poems: The Hawk [And] Baltimore Oriole, Don Welch, Mark Emil Sanders

Nebraska Bird Review

The Hawk

Baltimore Oriole


The Timing And Pattern Of Myogenesis In Hymenochirus Boettgeri, Matthew T. Smetanick, Rafael O. De Sá, Gary P. Radice Jun 1999

The Timing And Pattern Of Myogenesis In Hymenochirus Boettgeri, Matthew T. Smetanick, Rafael O. De Sá, Gary P. Radice

Biology Faculty Publications

Differences in the relative timing of homologous developmental events among closely related species, known as heterochronies, may provide valuable clues in understanding evolutionary relationships (McKinney, 1988; McNamara, 1995). Examining the timing of myogenic events is a relatively easy and effective method for finding heterochronic events. For example, whether muscle proteins and myofibrils appear before or after multinucleation can be determined through histological techniciques (Kielbowna, 1981). Simple observations of live specimens can pinpoint functional landmarks such as first twitch (spontaneous or due to external stimuli) and first heartbeat.


Ion And Acid-Base Balance In Three Species Of Amazonian Fish During Gradual Acidification Of Extremely Soft Water, R. W. Wilson, C. M. Wood, R. J. Gonzalez, M. L. Patrick, Harold Bergman, A. Narahara, A. L. Val May 1999

Ion And Acid-Base Balance In Three Species Of Amazonian Fish During Gradual Acidification Of Extremely Soft Water, R. W. Wilson, C. M. Wood, R. J. Gonzalez, M. L. Patrick, Harold Bergman, A. Narahara, A. L. Val

Zoology Faculty Publications

Sensitivity to acid water was assessed in three species of Amazonian fish that encounter naturally acidic blackwaters to differing degrees in the wild: tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), matrincha (Brycon erythropterum), and tamoata (Hoplosternum littorale), in decreasing order of occurrence in blackwater. Fish were exposed to a graded reduction in water pH, from pH 6 to 5 to 4 to 3.5, followed by return to pH 6. Fish were exposed to each new pH for 24 h. During these exposures, net transfers of ions (Na+, K+, Cl-, and Ca2+) and acid-base equivalents to and from the external water were used as ...