Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Zoology

1997

Institution
Keyword
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 87

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Puncturing Ability Of Bat Canine Teeth: The Tip, Patricia W. Freeman, William N. Weins Dec 1997

Puncturing Ability Of Bat Canine Teeth: The Tip, Patricia W. Freeman, William N. Weins

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

Casts of upper canine teeth of 15 species of microchiropteran bats were fixed securely into a testing machine and made to puncture the bloom side of an apple. The force necessary to break through the surface of the apple was regressed against both shape of the tip of the canine and the size of the animal. Sharper tips require less force to puncture than blunt ones. Results were also verified using giant two-dimensional models of Plexiglas™ with sharp and blunt tips that were loaded onto a Plexiglas™ beam. Fringes, or stress lines, are more highly concentrated at the point of ...


A Probable Nesting Of Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga Columbiana) In Nebraska,, Wayne Mollhoff Dec 1997

A Probable Nesting Of Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga Columbiana) In Nebraska,, Wayne Mollhoff

Nebraska Bird Review

This report provides details on the probable nesting of Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) in Morrill, Scotts Bluff Co., Nebraska, in 1997. It also corrects an erroneous report of nesting in the Pine Ridge area of Nebraska (Silcock & Jorgensen 1997b).

A single Clark's Nutcracker was first noted corning to a suet feeder at the home of Ms. Edna C. Thomas in Morrill 8-9 Jan 1997. It came to the feeder at least weekly and was often seen daily. A second Clark's Nutcracker appeared during the second week of Feb. Initially, the bird already present was antagonistic towards it and tried to drive it away. Over a period of several days the agonistic behavior decreased and by the end of the week the two were corning to the feeder together. Thereafter, they came to feed together regularly, usually daily, through the rest of Feb. and all of March. By early April only one bird came to the feeder, still usually daily. On 27 April this nutcracker was noted carrying off a large chunk of suet toward a row of large cottonwoods several hundred meters away, arousing suspicion that it was carrying food to young. The trees were searched unsuccessfully for a nest.

On 7 May the adult bird came to the feeder accompanied by what appeared to be a juvenile bird, which hung back from the feeder, sitting in the shadows of a branch and begging for food (begging call, lowered body, fluttering wings, open mouth), but the adult did not feed it, nor did the begging bird feed itself. On 8 May the two birds returned to the feeder. This time the juvenile was in direct sunlight and Ms. Thomas noted the following plumage characteristics: a tannish-gray cast to the facial feathers around the beak and eyes; gray body feathers were dull colored with a slight tannish cast, rather than a clean gray like the adult's; the dark flight feathers in the wings had a definite brownish tinge rather than pure black like the adult's. Overall, she reported that the plumage was "softer appearing" than the adult's. Most of the color differences were subtle, noticeable only ...


Black-Throated Sparrow Banded In Omaha, Nebraska, Ruth C. Green Dec 1997

Black-Throated Sparrow Banded In Omaha, Nebraska, Ruth C. Green

Nebraska Bird Review

On 20 December 1997, I banded a Black-throated Sparrow in the vicinity of 43rd and J Streets in South Omaha, Nebraska. The band number on this bird is 2120/83856. It was an AHY-Male and, according to the description given by James D. Rising in his book, A Guide to the Identification and Natural History of the Sparrows of the United States and Canada, it was of the subspecies Amphispiza b. bilineata. This is the smallest of the three races found in the united States and it is indigenous to central Texas. Besides the smaller size, the identifying field mark ...


Fall Field Report, August-November 1997, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen Dec 1997

Fall Field Report, August-November 1997, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

Notable this Fall was very heavy coverage of the Panhandle during Sep-Oct, which yielded several outstanding records (all, of course, pending NOURC approval). Incredible were first Panhandle records of Golden-winged, Chestnut-sided, Bay-breasted, and Prothonotary Warblers, 3rd record of Northern Waterthrush, and 4th record of Blackburnian Warbler. Philadelphia Vireo was found in the Panhandle for the 3rd time. Important also were 3 records of Hammond's Flycatcher, the 3rd-6th for the state, and likely a regular migrant, and 5 of Cassin's vireo, previously known only by 2 specimens. Finally, from the Panhandle, 4 reports of Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher may be changing ...


Index To Volume 65 Of The Nebraska Bird Review Dec 1997

Index To Volume 65 Of The Nebraska Bird Review

Nebraska Bird Review

Index to Volume 65

Avocet, American 134

Alaska 53(2), 57

Albino 41

Alexander, George 35

Irene 35

Allen, Betty 36, 67

Alt, Jim 178

Anas Valisineria 58

Anhinga 7

Ani, Groove-billed 11

Anschutz, Steven Whooping Crane Sighting during March-May 132

.................

Zendeh, Soheil 126


Editor's Comments- Nebraska Bird Review (December 1997), Rosalind Morris Dec 1997

Editor's Comments- Nebraska Bird Review (December 1997), Rosalind Morris

Nebraska Bird Review

EDITOR'S COMMENTS

This issue is the last of my six-year term as Editor of The Nebraska Bird Review. It has been a challenging and stimulating experience, and I have learned much about bird lore and publishing methods. My workload was lightened considerably when Ross Silcock took on the seasonal field reports in 1994, assisted initially by Richard C. Rosche and recently by Joel G. Jorgensen. Dr. R. G. (Rusty) Cortelyou volunteered to compile the index for each volume during my term. This is a time-consuming and detailed project, and I sincerely appreciate his contribution.

I am very pleased that ...


Notes On The Nesting Biology Of Pygmy Nuthatches In Nebraska, Wayne Mollhoff Dec 1997

Notes On The Nesting Biology Of Pygmy Nuthatches In Nebraska, Wayne Mollhoff

Nebraska Bird Review

Introduction

Pygmy Nuthatches (Sitta pygmaea) were considered to be no more than casual or rare winter visitors to the northwest part of Nebraska by previous investigators (Bruner et al. 1904; Swenk 1918; Haecker et al. 1945; Rapp et al. 1958, 1971). I. S. Trostler's earlier comment that the species was "a rare resident, breeds in Omaha" (Bruner 1896) was later felt to be in error, as evidenced by Bruner's later comment that it was, "A fall and winter visitor . . . not breeding in the state" (Bruner et al. 1904).

The first evidence of breeding was the collection of a ...


Whooping Crane Sightings, August 1997-January 1998, Steven Anschutz Dec 1997

Whooping Crane Sightings, August 1997-January 1998, Steven Anschutz

Nebraska Bird Review

Cooperation throughout the Whooping Crane flyway continues to be excellent, and special thanks go out to each participant. Between 1977 and 1988, 132 juvenile birds were color-marked on the breeding grounds, and 40 were accounted for during the winter of 1997-98. Fourteen color-marked Whooping Cranes were observed during the fall migration. All sightings of color-marked birds are maintained at the Grand Island office. The importance of observers looking closely for the colored leg bands cannot be overemphasized.

Based on observations of the breeding grounds during the summer of 1997, about 192 Whooping Cranes were expected to arrive at the Aransas ...


Nebraska Bird Review (December 1997) 65 (4), Whole Issue Dec 1997

Nebraska Bird Review (December 1997) 65 (4), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Whooping Crane Sightings, August 1997-January 1998 … 146

A Probable Nesting of Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) in Nebraska … 147

Notes on the Nesting Biology of Pygmy Nuthatches in Nebraska … 150

Fall Field Report, August-November 1997 … 159

Observers for Fall Field Report … 178

Black-throated Sparrow Banded in Omaha, Nebraska … 179

Editor's Comments … 179

Index to Volume 65 (compiled by R. G. Cortelyou) … 180


Caloric Production Of Black Bear Foods In Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Robert Michael Inman Dec 1997

Caloric Production Of Black Bear Foods In Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Robert Michael Inman

Masters Theses

Understanding energetic potential of habitat patches is important for management designed to provide adequate habitat for wildlife species. Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) has a high density of black bears that have been studied intensively from 1968-1997; habitats within the Park are relatively undisturbed, and similar vegetative cover types can be found throughout the southern Appalachian mountains. Black bear reproduction in the Park has been correlated to hard mast production, however little work has been done to assess the importance of soft mast. Geographic Information System (GIS) based habitat use models have been developed for bears in the Park ...


Fish Fauna Of The Upper Cumberland River Drainage In Tennessee, John T. Baxter Dec 1997

Fish Fauna Of The Upper Cumberland River Drainage In Tennessee, John T. Baxter

Masters Theses

This thesis reports the findings of an ichthyofaunal survey of the upper Cumberland River drainage in Scott, Campbell, and Claiborne counties, Tennessee. This drainage lies on the Cumberland Plateau in northeastern Tennessee and has been impacted by extensive coal mining activity in the region. Present in the drainage are five listed species of primary concern to this study, Phoxinus cumberlandensis, Ericymba buccata, Notropis rubellus rubellus, Etheostoma baileyi, and Etheostoma sagitta. An additional species found in this drainage, Etheostoma nigrum susanae, is being considered for protected status. Field work for this survey was conducted mainly during May-August 1996 and May-August 1997 ...


Abstracts Of Papers. Pages 1 - 38, International Theriological Congress Sep 1997

Abstracts Of Papers. Pages 1 - 38, International Theriological Congress

International Theriological Congress Abstracts of Papers

No abstract provided.


Survey Of Mollusks Of The Niobrara River: Final Report, Patricia W. Freeman, Keith Perkins Sep 1997

Survey Of Mollusks Of The Niobrara River: Final Report, Patricia W. Freeman, Keith Perkins

Papers in Natural Resources

We surveyed the mollusks of the Niobrara River in Nebraska from 1992–1996. We found two species of unionid clams and ten species of snails that either must live in water or near water. Both clams and snails are poorly sampled in the state, however we attribute the low number of species of unionid clams in the Niobrara to its cold, fast flow and rocky bottom. In contrast, the Platte River is slower moving with a muddy bottom and has at least 11 species of unionid clams. Each species has been mapped with latitude/longitude coordinates. Specimens have been curated ...


Abstracts Of Papers. Pages 39 - 58, International Theriological Congress Sep 1997

Abstracts Of Papers. Pages 39 - 58, International Theriological Congress

International Theriological Congress Abstracts of Papers

No abstract provided.


Abstracts Of Papers. Pages 59-88., International Theriological Congress Sep 1997

Abstracts Of Papers. Pages 59-88., International Theriological Congress

International Theriological Congress Abstracts of Papers

No abstract provided.


Diet Of A Relict Population Of The Eastern Woodrat In Nebraska, Hugh H. Genoways, Patricia W. Freeman, Mary K. Clausen Sep 1997

Diet Of A Relict Population Of The Eastern Woodrat In Nebraska, Hugh H. Genoways, Patricia W. Freeman, Mary K. Clausen

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

The relict population of Neotoma floridana occurring along the Niobrara River in north-central Nebraska was found to have a diet composed of 38 types of food items of which 37 types were plants. Unique features of the summer diet of this population were a higher than expected use of red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) and invertebrates as food items.


Nebraska Bird Review (September 1997) 65(3), Whole Issue Sep 1997

Nebraska Bird Review (September 1997) 65(3), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Summer Field Report, June-July 1997 … 102

1996 (Eighth) Report of the NOU Records Committee … 115

Notes on Bird Sightings in Nebraska … 126

International Shorebird Survey Report for southeastern Nebraska - Spring 1997 … 127

Mountain Plover Nest in Kimball County … 131

Whooping Crane Sightings during March-May 1997 Migration … 132

Shorebird Migration in the Eastern Rainwater Basin - Spring 1997 … 133

Two Hybrid Diving Ducks at Cunningham Lake, Douglas County … 135

Spring 1997 Bird Counts during Tristate Meeting, and for North Platte - Lincoln County … 137

Remembering Doris Gates, a Great Teacher … 143

Book Announcement … 143


1996 (Eighth) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Mark A. Brogie Sep 1997

1996 (Eighth) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Mark A. Brogie

Nebraska Bird Review

The functions and methods of the NOU Records Committee are described in its bylaws (NOU Records Committee 1986). The committee's purpose is to provide a procedure for documenting unusual bird sightings and to establish a list of all documented birds for Nebraska. THE OFFICIAL LIST OF THE BIRDS OF NEBRASKA was first published in 1988 (NOU Records Committee 1988) and has been appended six times (Mollhoff 1989, Grenon 1990, 1991, Gubanyi l996a, 1996b, 1996c). An update of THE OFFICIAL LIST OF THE BIRDS OF NEBRASKA was last published in 1997 (NOU Records Committee 1997) and includes the additions and ...


Notes On Bird Sightings In Nebraska, L. Iola Pennington Sep 1997

Notes On Bird Sightings In Nebraska, L. Iola Pennington

Nebraska Bird Review

1997 Report for Wauneta area, Chase County. I have seen 49 species, including 20 Turkey Vultures, many Wild Turkeys, a covey of Northern Bobwhite near my house, a Ruby-throated Hummingbird in my garden flowers such as Gilia, and a Black-headed Grosbeak—a first for my acreage. On 6 September, a male Northern Cardinal brought two young to one of the seven water pans I keep for birds and animals. Other species listed in the area: Great Blue Heron, Gadwall, American Kestrel, Ring-necked Pheasant, Killdeer, Rock Dove, Mourning Dove, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Common Nighthawk, Chimney Swift, Belted Kingfisher, Red-headed Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker ...


International Shorebird Survey Report For Southeastern Nebraska—Spring 1997, Kevin Poague, John Dinan Sep 1997

International Shorebird Survey Report For Southeastern Nebraska—Spring 1997, Kevin Poague, John Dinan

Nebraska Bird Review

In 1974, Manomet Observatory in Massachusetts organized the International Shorebird Survey (ISS) to collect information on shorebirds during migration. The project is intended to monitor shorebird population trends and to identify major migration routes, timing, and locations of staging areas. More than 600 contributors from 38 states of the United States, and countries, territories, and commonwealths throughout the hemisphere have contributed data since the program's inception. The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission collected data for the ISS in the eastern Rainwater Basin area (Clay, Fillmore, York, and Seward counties) from 1993-1996.

Nebraska's eastern saline wetlands, located in or ...


Mountain Plover Nest In Kimball County, Stephen J. Dinsmore Sep 1997

Mountain Plover Nest In Kimball County, Stephen J. Dinsmore

Nebraska Bird Review

On 18 May 1995 I observed two adult Mountain Plovers 5 mi west and 1.25 mi north of Bushnell in southwest Kimball county. The birds were in an area of short-grass prairie interspersed with clumps of prickly pear and bare ground. I observed both birds almost continuously from 1-2 p.m. MDT. The first bird was along the road south of the fenceline, just after the road climbs on top of the plateau. The second bird was about 0.1 mi to the north on the west side of the road. Both birds were medium-sized, plain shorebirds, similar in ...


Whooping Crane Sightings During March-May 1997 Migration, Steven Anschutz Sep 1997

Whooping Crane Sightings During March-May 1997 Migration, Steven Anschutz

Nebraska Bird Review

During the 1996-97 winter, 158 (143 adult/subadult and 15 juvenile) Whooping Cranes stayed at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in Texas. Two early migrants in Nebraska were an adult-plumaged bird first observed on 9 March, and a juvenile confirmed on 19 March. Neither of these birds wintered at Aransas, so the total population was therefore 160 (144 adult/subadult and 16 juvenile). All 158 cranes wintering at Aransas were present 3 April, but by 10 April, about 103 cranes had begun to migrate, and by 24 April, only 13 cranes were still at Aransas. All cranes had migrated by ...


Summer Field Report, June-July 1997, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen Sep 1997

Summer Field Report, June-July 1997, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

A couple of preliminary notes: in the accounts below we have noted for several species "Reports were routine." This means that these species, mostly common in occurrence, were indeed present and reported, but the reports did not include unusual arrival or departure dates or high counts. For this Summer Report, observers are encouraged to report high counts on their BBS routes, as well as nesting data such as egg and fledging dates. Finally, this report includes a few observations from 1996.

In general, this was a rather routine summer period. The only real rarity was, however, a good one, a ...


Shorebird Migration In The Eastern Rainwater Basin—Spring 1997, Joel G. Jorgensen Sep 1997

Shorebird Migration In The Eastern Rainwater Basin—Spring 1997, Joel G. Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

The Rainwater Basin is arguably Nebraska's most productive area for observing migrant shorebirds, especially in spring. After several years of irregular shorebirding in the region, in 1997 I decided to perform regular shorebird censuses in the eastern portion of the RWB (eRWB).


Two Hybrid Diving Ducks At Cunningham Lake, Douglas County, Joel G. Jorgensen Sep 1997

Two Hybrid Diving Ducks At Cunningham Lake, Douglas County, Joel G. Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

During the spring of 1997 I had the opportunity to observe and study two apparent hybrid diving ducks at Glenn Cunningham Lake, Douglas County. Both birds appeared to be mature males in breeding plumage. One bird was a suspected Redhead x Canvasback hybrid and the other was a suspected Common Goldeneye x Hooded Merganser hybrid. Sibley (1994) states that both hybrid combinations occur "occasionally."


Spring 1997 Bird Counts During Tristate Meeting, And For North Platte-Lincoln County, Nebraska Sep 1997

Spring 1997 Bird Counts During Tristate Meeting, And For North Platte-Lincoln County, Nebraska

Nebraska Bird Review

The Ornithologists' Unions of Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota held a Tristate spring meeting at Sioux City, IA on 16-18 May, organized by Bill Huser and committee members from Iowa and South Dakota, and hosted by the Loess Hills Audubon Society from South Sioux City, NE. Field trips were made into nearby areas of all three states. During an indoor session, a paper on "Migrating Hawks along Iowa's Loess Hills" was presented by Loren and Babs Padelford. The banquet speaker was Ken Kaufman, who spoke on "Bird study and natural history in the 21st century." During the weekend, a ...


Remembering Doris Gates, A Great Teacher, Mark M. Peyton Sep 1997

Remembering Doris Gates, A Great Teacher, Mark M. Peyton

Nebraska Bird Review

Doris Gates (1915-1983) taught Biology at Huntley, NE from 1938-1941, North Platte from 1941-1955, and Chadron State College from 1955-1974. She lived until her death at the foot of "Rush No More Butte" south of Chadron, was a member of the North Platte Tout Bird Club, and served as President of the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union and Editor of The Nebraska Bird Review.

Doris included plants and birds in her lectures on Biology, but she taught much more than that because she understood the beauty of life. She believed that beauty was in what you did rather than what you looked ...


Book Announcement [September 1997] Sep 1997

Book Announcement [September 1997]

Nebraska Bird Review

A 12-volume work entitled "Handbook of the Birds of the World" is in the making, with nine authors representing six countries (four from the U.S.) and 17 artists. The first three volumes have been published, and the fourth is due in December 1997. Each volume is illustrated with color photographs, color plates, and distribution maps. The publisher is Lynx Edicions, Passeig de Gracia, 12, 08007 Barcelona, Spain. The first four volumes can be purchased for us $580 (special offer until 12/31/97), or monthly payments can be arranged (no extra postage or packaging charges). Further information can be ...


Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1997) 65(3) Sep 1997

Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1997) 65(3)

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December by the Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears for dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $12.50 in the United States, $15.00 in Canada and Mexico, and $17.50 for all other countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary H. Pritchard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.


Behavior Patterns In Free-Ranging Black Rat Snakes, Charles Amlaner, James Withgott Aug 1997

Behavior Patterns In Free-Ranging Black Rat Snakes, Charles Amlaner, James Withgott

Charles J. Amlaner

While activity patterns of some animals are guided strictly by light-dark cycles or circadian rhythms, others show more flexible behavior. For ectothermic animals such as snakes, the temperature of their surroundings is a key factor in their physiology, behavior, and ecology. Various other factors, e.g., hunger, reproductive behavior, ecdysis, prey availability, and predation risk, also influence a snake's patterns of activity, often in conflicting and unpredictable ways. Studies of sleep patterns in such animals with variable and irregular activity may yield insights into the functions of sleep.