Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Zoology

1996

Institution
Keyword
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 85

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Eumops Perotis., Troy L. Best, W. Mark Kiser, Patricia W. Freeman Dec 1996

Eumops Perotis., Troy L. Best, W. Mark Kiser, Patricia W. Freeman

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

Eumops perotis is the largest bat in the United States. The greater mastiff bat resembles other North American free-tailed bats, but is distinguished from other molossids by its large size and lack of long guard hairs on the rump (Barbour and Davis, 1969). E. perotis has the thinnest dentary of any Eumops (Freeman, 1981a).In the United States, E. perotis can be separated from E. underwoodi by its larger size (forearm is 73-83 mm in E. perotis and 65-77 mm in E. underwoodi), darker color, and lack of long guard hairs on the rump. The ears are longer (36-47 mm ...


Whooping Crane Sightings, August-December 1996, Steven Anschutz Dec 1996

Whooping Crane Sightings, August-December 1996, Steven Anschutz

Nebraska Bird Review

Based on observations of the breeding grounds during the summer of 1996, about 170 Whooping Cranes were expected to arrive at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in Texas during the fall. The first arrival (two birds) was confirmed on 23 October. A total of 158 birds (143 adults/subadults and 15 young) were wintering at Aransas 1996-97. As of 16 January 1997, six adults and eight subadults, of the number anticipated, had not arrived at the refuge.

The first recorded dates for confirmed observations of migrating Whooping Cranes were 2 August in Canada and 22 September in the United States ...


Index From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996) Dec 1996

Index From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996)

Nebraska Bird Review

INDEX TO VOLUME 64

Alexander, George 25. 33. 34 Irene 25, 33, 34

Alfred, Norris 34 Allen, Betty 25, 82 Reid 25

Another Common Crane in Nebraska
with a Summary of North
American Records 80

....

Yellowlegs, Greater 50, 85, 94, 113
Lesser 50, 85, 94, 113

Yellowthroat, Common 63, 88, 101, 123

Zwink, Duane 24


Masthead And Table Of Contents From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996) 64(4) Dec 1996

Masthead And Table Of Contents From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996) 64(4)

Nebraska Bird Review

Table of Contents

Fall Field Report, August-November 1996 ... 106

Observers for Fall Field Report ... 129

Whooping Crane Sightings, August-December 1996 ... 129

Notes on Bird Sightings in Nebraska ... 130

1995 (Seventh) Report of the NOU Records Committee ... 132

Book Review ... 138

Index to Volume 64 (compiled by R. G. Cortelyou) ... 139


"Notes On Bird Sightings In Nebraska," From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996) Dec 1996

"Notes On Bird Sightings In Nebraska," From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996)

Nebraska Bird Review

House Finches. This species has been appearing at my backyard feeders, 10 to 30 feet from our window, for several years, increasing in number each year. They came nearly every day in 1996 except during a period that I associate with post-breeding molt. Numbers varied from one to a maximum of 17 at one time, with 11 counted for the 1996 Christmas Bird Count. We commonly use 7-8 power binoculars to look for a rare Purple Finch. House Finches are noticeably smaller than House Sparrows and slightly larger than American Goldfinches, and feed with both species.

Males have varied in ...


"Book Review," From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996) 64(4), Hazel Scheiber Dec 1996

"Book Review," From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996) 64(4), Hazel Scheiber

Nebraska Bird Review

This book contains 18 essays based on observations Miss Sherman made on a farm in northeastern Iowa six miles west of the Mississippi River, near McGregor. The essays were given at meetings of scientific societies (she belonged to 15) or were published in their journals, and included such titles as "Feeding Winter Birds" and "Experiments in Feeding Hummingbirds During Seven Summers." She was recognized for her knowledge of birds, and her forceful and pungent wit.

Miss Sherman was born on the Iowa farm in 1853 and died there in 1943. She was an artist and teacher for the first 20 ...


Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996) 64(4), Whole Issue Dec 1996

Nebraska Bird Review (December 1996) 64(4), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Fall Field Report, August–November 1996 … 106

Observers for Fall Field Report … 129

Whooping Crane Sightings, August–December 1996 … 129

Notes on Bird Sightings in Nebraska … 130

1995 (Seventh) Report of the NOU Records Committee … 132

Book Review … 138

Index to Volume 64 (compiled by R. G. Cortelyou) … 139


1995 (Seventh) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Joseph A. Gubanyi Dec 1996

1995 (Seventh) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Joseph A. Gubanyi

Nebraska Bird Review

The functions and methods of the NOU Records Committee are described in its bylaws (NOU Records Committee 1986). The committee's purpose is to provide a procedure for documenting unusual bird sightings and to establish a list of all documented birds for Nebraska. The official list of birds was last published in 1988 (NOU Records Committee 1988), and has been appended five times (Mollhoff 1989, Grenon 1990, 1991, Gubanyi 1996a, 1996b).

This report includes accounts submitted during the calendar year 1995 and covering records with accession numbers 396-450, 480-490. All records mentioned here will be available to interested persons at ...


Fall Field Report, August-November 1996, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen Dec 1996

Fall Field Report, August-November 1996, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

This fall we received numerous excellent reports from which to compile this summary. Most parts of the state are covered, except the southwest and north central, although many observers at least pass through those areas. A note about details on unusual observations. The new NOU Field Card, which can be ordered by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to the NOU Librarian, Univ of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514, indicates species that need complete documentations, mostly casual and accidental species. However, we realize that information about early and late migration dates, and rarity in the west or east is not ...


Helminths Of The Southwestern Toad, Bufo Microscaphus, Woodhouse's Toad, Bufo Woodhousii (Bufonidae), And Their Hybrids From Central Arizona, Stephen R. Goldberg, Charles R. Bursey, Keith B. Malmos, Brian K. Sullivan, Hay Cheam Nov 1996

Helminths Of The Southwestern Toad, Bufo Microscaphus, Woodhouse's Toad, Bufo Woodhousii (Bufonidae), And Their Hybrids From Central Arizona, Stephen R. Goldberg, Charles R. Bursey, Keith B. Malmos, Brian K. Sullivan, Hay Cheam

Great Basin Naturalist

The gastrointestinal tracts, lungs, and urinary bladders from 77 Bufo microscaphus, 61 Bufo woodhousii, and 8 of their hybrids were examined for helminths. One species of trematode (Glypthelmins quieta), 1 species of cestode (Distoichometra bufonis), and 5 species of nematodes (Aplectana incerta, A. itzocanensis, Rhabdias americanus, Physaloptera sp., and Physocephalus sp.) were found. The greatest prevalence (41%) and mean intensity (231.7) were recorded for Aplectana incerta in Bufo woodhousii. It appears hybrids harbor fewer parasites than either parent species.


The Centipede Lithobius Celer (Chilopoda: Lithobiidae) In Wisconsin, Dreux J. Watermolen Oct 1996

The Centipede Lithobius Celer (Chilopoda: Lithobiidae) In Wisconsin, Dreux J. Watermolen

Field Station Bulletins

The centipede Lithobius celer Bollman 1888 has been reported from Wisconsin only one time. Chamberlin (1911) provisionally referred specimens collected from unspecified Wisconsin and Michigan localities to this species, with considerable doubt since neither was a ''fully-grown male/' Subsequent investigators (e.g., Matthews 1935, Crabill 1958) did not report L. celer from the state. While examining specimens collected as part of an on-going prairie ecology study, I discovered a L. celer specimen from southern Wisconsin. The specimen was collected in a pitfall trap at Hawkhill Prairie, Dane County (T9N, R8E, Sec. 5) on 21 August 1986 by A. Lisken.


Notes On The Milliped Pleuroloma Flavipes (Polydesmida: Xystodesmidae) In Wisconsin, Dreux J. Watermolen, G Andrew Larsen Oct 1996

Notes On The Milliped Pleuroloma Flavipes (Polydesmida: Xystodesmidae) In Wisconsin, Dreux J. Watermolen, G Andrew Larsen

Field Station Bulletins

The milliped Pleuroloma flavipes Rafinesque 1820 is one of the more widespread and better known North American millipeds. During the course of recent studies in Wisconsin, we have had opportunities to examine museum specimens and make field observations of this species. In this note, we report new locality records, discuss observations of mass aggregations, describe a color variation, and illustrate an individual with developmental abnormalities.


Comparison Of Wisconsin Terrestrial Isopods And Their Life Cycle Traits, Joan Jass, Barbara Klausmeier Oct 1996

Comparison Of Wisconsin Terrestrial Isopods And Their Life Cycle Traits, Joan Jass, Barbara Klausmeier

Field Station Bulletins

Seasonal reproductive patterns for the 11 terrestrial isopod species found in Wisconsin are presented. The pattern of the most widespread species, Trachelipus rathkei, is examined hi detail through a series of paired north/south samplings which reveal a seasonal lag in the percent of females which were gravid in populations from the northern part of the state. A difference in sex ratio between north and south samples is reported.


Genetic And Phylogenetic Divergence Of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus In The Puma (Puma Concolor), Margaret A. Carpenter, Eric W. Brown, Melanie Culver, Warren E. Johnson, Jill Pecon-Slattery, Dulce Brousset, Stephen J. O'Brien Oct 1996

Genetic And Phylogenetic Divergence Of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus In The Puma (Puma Concolor), Margaret A. Carpenter, Eric W. Brown, Melanie Culver, Warren E. Johnson, Jill Pecon-Slattery, Dulce Brousset, Stephen J. O'Brien

Biology Faculty Articles

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus which causes an AIDS-like disease in domestic cats (Felis catus). A number of other felid species, including the puma (Puma concolor), carry a virus closely related to domestic cat FIV. Serological testing revealed the presence of antibodies to FIV in 22% of 434 samples from throughout the geographic range of the puma. FIV-Pco pol gene sequences isolated from pumas revealed extensive sequence diversity, greater than has been documented in the domestic cat. The puma sequences formed two highly divergent groups, analogous to the clades which have been defined for domestic cat and lion ...


Diversity Of Arkansas Water Resources Research, Kenneth F. Steele Oct 1996

Diversity Of Arkansas Water Resources Research, Kenneth F. Steele

Technical Reports

In order to understand, protect, and manage our water resources effectively knowledge is required from many diverse areas of science, engineering, economics, and sociology. These proceedings of the conference on the Diversity of Arkansas Water Resources Research reflect this need and demonstrate how researchers in the state are responding to water issues and problems in Arkansas. The papers in these proceedings are representative of the research in Arkansas, but are only a sample of the work being conducted by universities and government agencies in Arkansas. We are grateful that Arkansas has the expertise available to provide the information necessary to ...


Respiratory Physiology Of The Lake Magadi Tilapia (Oreochromis Alcalicus Grahami), A Fish Adapted To A Hot, Alkaline, And Frequently Hypoxic Environment, A. Narahara, Harold Bergman, P. Laurent, J. N. Maina, P. J. Walsh, C. M. Wood Sep 1996

Respiratory Physiology Of The Lake Magadi Tilapia (Oreochromis Alcalicus Grahami), A Fish Adapted To A Hot, Alkaline, And Frequently Hypoxic Environment, A. Narahara, Harold Bergman, P. Laurent, J. N. Maina, P. J. Walsh, C. M. Wood

Zoology Faculty Publications

The tilapia Oreochromis alcalicus grahami is a unique ureotelic teleost, that only fish that lives in the alkaline hotsprings of Lake Magadi, Kenya. Physical conditions and fish behavior were monitored in the Fish Springs Lagoon area, a site where the tilapia were particularly abundant. Water Po-2 and temperature fluctuated more or less in parallel in a diurnal cycle from less than 20 Torr and less than 25 degrees C at night to greater than 400 Torr and 38 degrees C during the day, whereas pH remained constant at approximately 9.8. Field laboratory tests demonstrated that routine Mo-2 (under normoxia ...


A Late Baird's Sandpiper In Keith County, Stephen J. Dinsmore Sep 1996

A Late Baird's Sandpiper In Keith County, Stephen J. Dinsmore

Nebraska Bird Review

On 23 December 1994, Gordon Brown and I were walking the North Platte River below Keystone Dam as part of the Lake McConaughy Christmas Bird Count (CBC). At approximately 8:30 a.m. MST, about 0.5 mi below the dam, we observed a group of 8 Killdeer and a smaller shorebird, which we immediately recognized as a "peep." We studied the bird for about 30 minutes at distances as close as 40 feet and then returned in the afternoon to photograph it. The size and black legs immediately eliminated Least Sandpiper, and the dark rump eliminated White-rumped Sandpiper. The ...


Nebraska Ornithologists' Union Annual Meeting 18 May 1996, Robin Harding Sep 1996

Nebraska Ornithologists' Union Annual Meeting 18 May 1996, Robin Harding

Nebraska Bird Review

The 1997 Annual Meeting will be held jointly with the South Dakota and Iowa Ornithologists' Unions in South Sioux City, NE 16-18 May.

Neal Ratzlaff, President, reported on several items. Funds are being sought to publish the Breeding Bird Atlas for Nebraska. The new NOU Field Cards of Nebraska Birds are ready for distribution. The Wildlife Diversity Funding Initiative is on hold because some companies are afraid of increasing their prices. NOU members were encouraged to urge Cabela's to support the Initiative. [See NBR 63 (3) 1995, p. 91 for details.]

A request was received from Fermata, Inc., which ...


A Review Of The Status Of Limnodromus Griseus, The Short-Billed Dowitcher, In Nebraska, Joel Jorgensen Sep 1996

A Review Of The Status Of Limnodromus Griseus, The Short-Billed Dowitcher, In Nebraska, Joel Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

The two North American dowitchers are notoriously difficult to distinguish from each other. This is not only true of field observations, but there are several instances where a specimen identified as one species was found to be the other upon review. Limnodromus scolopaceus, the Long-billed Dowitcher, has always been considered the common dowitcher in Nebraska, while Limnodromus griseus, the Short-billed Dowitcher, is less common. Confusion about identification and the lack of consistent, well-documented records have caused the status of L. griseus in Nebraska to be a matter of speculation.

Taxonomy of dowitchers was for some time confused. Studies of speciation ...


Another Common Crane In Nebraska With A Summary Of North American Records, Gary Lingle Sep 1996

Another Common Crane In Nebraska With A Summary Of North American Records, Gary Lingle

Nebraska Bird Review

On 30 March 1996 around 1000 h CST, Bob Janssen and Jim Williams of Minnetonka, Minnesota, discovered a Common Crane (Grus grus) feeding in corn stubble with a flock of Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) in Section 34 T9R10 Hall County, Nebraska. The Commom Crane associated with the Sandhill Cranes, which were at peak numbers in the Platte River valley. Later that day, several observers, including myself, witnessed the bird in section 32 about 500 yards away, where it mingled with a few hundred Sandhill Cranes. The difficulty in seeing this bird was illustrated by the fact that during a 2-hour ...


Masthead And Table Of Contents Nebraska Bird Review 64(3) September 1996 Sep 1996

Masthead And Table Of Contents Nebraska Bird Review 64(3) September 1996

Nebraska Bird Review

Table of Contents

A Review of the Status of Limnodromus griseus, the Short-billed Dowitcher, in Nebraska ……………..74

A Late Baird’s Sandpiper in Keith County ……………..79

Another Common Crane in Nebraska with a Summary of North American Records…………….. 80

Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union Annual Meeting 18 May 1996…………….. 82

NOU and NAMC Spring Bird Counts May 1996…………….. 83

Table of Bird Species Observed during NOU Annual Meeting 17-19 May 1996, and NAMC 11 May 1996 in Two Counties…………….. 84

Summer Field Report June-July 1996 ……………..90

Observers for Summer Field Report ……………..103


Nou And Namc Spring Bird Count, May 1996 Sep 1996

Nou And Namc Spring Bird Count, May 1996

Nebraska Bird Review

Bird species seen in a Nebraska five-county area during the Annual Meeting of the Nebraska ornithologists' Union 17-19 May, are presented in Table 1 on pages 84-90. The total count was 161 species.

The table also includes data for the North American Migration count on 11 May in two Nebraska counties, Boone (compiler: Wayne Mollhoff, Ashland), and Sarpy (compiler: Betty Grenon, Bellevue). Observations in Boone Co. were made between 9:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. with two observers for 6 hours and one observer for 3 hours. They covered 3 miles on foot for 6 hours and ...


Summer Field Report, June-July 1996, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen Sep 1996

Summer Field Report, June-July 1996, W. Ross Silcock, Joel G. Jorgensen

Nebraska Bird Review

Starting with this report, Joel Jorgensen will write the reports for sub-passerines. Hopefully this will help with timeliness, especially in getting reports to the Regional Editor for Audubon Field Notes. It is a long process writing up especially the Spring and Fall reports, given the excellent number received.

Highlights in this report are rare loons at Lake McConaughy, three reports of Clark's Grebe, King Rail in Seward Co, Sandhill Cranes in Clay Co, Mountain Plovers in Kimball Co, easterly reports of Black-necked Stilt, first breeding record for Wilson's Phalarope in the Rainwater Basin, Brown Creeper in Sarpy Co ...


Nebraska Bird Review (September 1996) 64(3), Whole Issue Sep 1996

Nebraska Bird Review (September 1996) 64(3), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

A Review of the Status of Limnodromus griseus, the Short-billed Dowitcher, in Nebraska ... 74

A Late Baird’s Sandpiper in Keith County ... 79

Another Common Crane in Nebraska with a Summary of North American Records … 80

Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union Annual Meeting 18 May 1996 ... 82

NOU and NAMC Spring Bird Counts May 1996 ... 83

Table of Bird Species Observed during NOU Annual Meeting 17–19 May 1996, and NAMC 11 May 1996 in Two Counties ... 84

Summer Field Report June–July 1996 ... 90

Observers for Summer Field Report … 103


A Recent Record Of Mountain Lion In Nebraska, Hugh H. Genoways, Patricia W. Freeman Sep 1996

A Recent Record Of Mountain Lion In Nebraska, Hugh H. Genoways, Patricia W. Freeman

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

On the morning of November 10, 1991, a deer hunter in the Pine Ridge area of extreme northwestern Nebraska shot a young female mountain lion (Gertzen, 1991, Omaha World-Herald, November 15, Sunrise ed. p. 17sf; Henion, 1991, Omaha World-Herald, November 15, Metro ed. p. 17). Although mountain lions (Felis concolor) were part of the original mammalian fauna of Nebraska (Jones, 1949, J. Mammal. 30: 313; 1962, Bull Univ. Nebraska State Mus. 4: 87-100; 1964, Univ. Kansas Publ., Mus. Nat. Hist. 16: 1-356), the species has been considered to be extirpated from the state. The most recent record that Jones could ...


Whooping Crane Sightings During March-May 1996 Migration, Steven Anschutz Jun 1996

Whooping Crane Sightings During March-May 1996 Migration, Steven Anschutz

Nebraska Bird Review

A peak population of 158 whooping cranes (130 adult/subadult and 28 juvenile) was reported at the Aransas National wildlife Refuge in Texas during the winter of 1995-96. One juvenile was believed to have died between March 17 and 20, so 157 cranes began the spring migration, an increase of 24 birds over 133 in spring, 1995. By April 4, about 82 cranes had begun to migrate, and by April 25, only 9 cranes remained at Aransas. All but 2 of these had migrated by May 3. One of the two cranes migrated sometime after May 22, but the other ...


Wanted: Information On Cliff Swallow Mortality, Charles R. Brown Jun 1996

Wanted: Information On Cliff Swallow Mortality, Charles R. Brown

Nebraska Bird Review

Cold and rainy weather during late May 1996 caused widespread mortality among Cliff Swallows (Hirundo pyrrhonota) in southwestern Nebraska. Thousands of birds died, and some local populations were reduced by at least half. I am trying to determine the geographic scope of the mortality event. I am also interested in determining how often kills like this occur. If you are aware of mortality among any hirundinids during spring 1996 in the central U.S. or ~ave recollections or records of other major Cliff Swallow die-offs ln any past years, please send details to me at the above address. Phone: (918 ...


Snowy Plovers In The Rainwater Basin, Stephen J. Dinsmore Jun 1996

Snowy Plovers In The Rainwater Basin, Stephen J. Dinsmore

Nebraska Bird Review

While conducting shorebird surveys in the Rainwater Basin of southcentral Nebraska in spring, 1995, I observed two Snowy Plovers (Charadrius alexandrinus). Both sightings were on 6 May, one at the Kissinger Basin Wildlife Management Area in Clay County, and the other at Ayr Lake in Adams County.

When I arrived at Kissinger Basin WMA, the weather was poor with steady rain and strong, northeast winds. At 8:15 a.m. I noticed a pale plover feeding on the far side of the wetland. I noted the black bill and legs, dark auricular patch, and slender appearance, and I identified the ...


1994 (Sixth) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Joseph A. Gubanyi Jun 1996

1994 (Sixth) Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Joseph A. Gubanyi

Nebraska Bird Review

The functions and methods of the NOU Records Committee are described in its bylaws (NOU Records Committee 1986). The committee's purpose is to provide a procedure for documenting unusual bird sightings and to establish a list of all documented birds for Nebraska. The official list of birds was last published in 1988 (NOU Records Committee 1988) and has been appended three times (Mollhoff 1989, Grenon 1990 and Grenon 1991, Gubanyi 1996).

This report includes accounts submitted during the calendar year of 1994 covering records with accession numbers 359-395, 411, and 412. All records mentioned here will be available to ...


Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (June 1996) 64(2) Jun 1996

Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (June 1996) 64(2)

Nebraska Bird Review

The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in arrears for dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $12.50 in the United States, $15.00 in Canada and Mexico, and $17.50 for all other countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $4.00 each, postpaid, in the United states, and $5.00 elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary H. Pritchard, NOU Librarian, University of Nebraska State Museum, Lincoln, NE 68588-0514.