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Zoology

1987

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Articles 1 - 30 of 96

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

A New Subspecies Of The Free-Tailed Bat, Molossops Greenhalli, From Western Mexico (Mammalia: Chiroptera), J. Knox Jones Jr., Hugh H. Genoways Dec 1987

A New Subspecies Of The Free-Tailed Bat, Molossops Greenhalli, From Western Mexico (Mammalia: Chiroptera), J. Knox Jones Jr., Hugh H. Genoways

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

In June of 1964, field parties from the Museum of Natural History, the University of Kansas, collected two specimens of a unique free-tailed bat in Mexico, one in the state of Guerrero and the other in Oaxaca. These proved to be the first specimens of Molossops greenhalli taken outside of Trinidad and the first bats of the genus to be reported from north of Panama. Subsequently, Percy L. Clifton obtained, in the state of Jalisco, three more individuals of M. greenhalli, including the first male from the North American mainland.

Comparison with material from Trinidad indicates that the Mexican bats ...


The Nebraska Bird Review (December 1987)- Whole Issue Dec 1987

The Nebraska Bird Review (December 1987)- Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

Table of Contents

Eskimo Curlew Sighted..............78

1987 Fall Field Day..............78

First Report of the NOU Records Committee..............79

Book Reviews..............85

Early Fall Migration of Sedge Wrens..............86

Notes..............88

Index to Volume 55..............89


1987 Fall Field Day Dec 1987

1987 Fall Field Day

Nebraska Bird Review

The weather was bright and clear for the 75 people who attended some part of the 1987 Fall Field Day at the 4-H Camp at Halsey National Forest 3 and 4 October. It was nice to have Mrs. Gross, who broke her leg at the Valentine meeting, among those attending. Her leg was progressing according to schedule, although she still used a crutch, There was the usual slide show Saturday night, the rest of the time was for birding, including banding. The Executive Board decided to have the terms of members of the Records Committee start and expire with the ...


Book Review- Nebraska Bird Review (December 1987) Dec 1987

Book Review- Nebraska Bird Review (December 1987)

Nebraska Bird Review

A Field Guide to Hawks of North America, William S. Clark. Illustrations by Brian K. Wheeler. 1987. Number 35 in The Peterson Field Guide Series. edited by Roger Tory Peterson. Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston. xii + 198 pp., 24 color plates. 2 black-and-white plates, 241 photographs. 6 figures. 32 maps. ISB N 0- 395-36001 - 3 (hardcover) $19.95, ISBN 0-395-44112-9 (softcover) $13.95.

The softcover is a mere 4.5 x 7.25 inches, and less than 0.75 inches thick, but the wealth of information concerning the field identification of diurnal raptors is enormous. William S. Clark, from Arlington, VA ...


Early Fall Migration Of Sedge Wrens, Paul A. Bedell Dec 1987

Early Fall Migration Of Sedge Wrens, Paul A. Bedell

Nebraska Bird Review

Johnsgard (1980) lists the Sedge Wren (Cistothorus platensis) as an uncommon spring and fall migrant in eastern Nebraska, and a rare summer resident in eastern Nebraska, mostly east of a line from Knox to Gage counties. Half of the initial spring records occur between 1 and 12 May, with the latest 3 June. Half of the final fal1 records occur between 11 Sept. and 9 Oct., with the earliest 29 July. This paper presents observations of Sedge Wrens during 1987 in southcentral Nebraska, west of the line.

I found Sedge Wrens to be local1y common in grassy or marshy areas ...


Eskimo Curlew Sighted Dec 1987

Eskimo Curlew Sighted

Nebraska Bird Review

When Craig Faanes, Grand Island, went to the Mormon Island Crane Meadows 16 April 1987 to watch Sandhill Cranes at night he saw a bird that he first took for a Whimbrel. He was familiar with Whimbrels on both coasts, but the more he studied the bird the more he was convinced that the bird was an Eskimo Curlew. After he had gone to the natural history museum at UNL and studied a stuffed Eskimo Curlew be was convinced that that was what he had seen. After the date of this sighting Eskimo Curlews were reported from "the Sabine and ...


First Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Wayne J. Mollhoff Dec 1987

First Report Of The Nou Records Committee, Wayne J. Mollhoff

Nebraska Bird Review

Since this is the first report of the NOU Records Committee, perhaps a few words of background explanation are in order. I was named to establish a records committee at the annual meeting of the NOU in May 1985. At the fall field day in October 1985 I met with those people who had indicated a willingness to serve and was named chairman. I presented a draft set of by-laws, which we discussed, amended, and adopted. The committee membership and by-laws were approved by the NOU Board of Directors and ultimately published (NBR 54:72-74, ]986). Two of the main ...


Index To Volume 55 Dec 1987

Index To Volume 55

Nebraska Bird Review

Index to Volume 55 (A-Z)

Accipiter sp. 4

Albino 7, 81, 88, 89

Alexander, George 7 Irene 7

Alfalfa 36

Alfred, Norris 15, 33(2), 59, 79 Wberry, Dwight 43

Allen, Betty 3

Andelt, Frank E. 33

Anderson, James 8

Anhinga 50

Ani, Groove-billed 82

Aphids 37

Avocet, American 14, 30, 35, 54, 59

...........

Yellowlegs, Greater 14, 54, 78
Lesser 14, 35, 43, 55
sp. 14, 55

Yellowthroat, Common 23, 34, 36, 48, 53, 63, 78

Zlonke, Jack 13, 57


Notes- Nebraska Bird Review (December 1987), Charles Lesick Sr., Graham Chisholm, Bill Garthright, John Row, R. G. Cortelyou Dec 1987

Notes- Nebraska Bird Review (December 1987), Charles Lesick Sr., Graham Chisholm, Bill Garthright, John Row, R. G. Cortelyou

Nebraska Bird Review

YELLOW RAILS. On 21 September 1986, while conducting a waterfowl survey on the Jack Senn WMA, near Ceresco, Lancaster Co., I flushed a small rail-like bird, which flew a short distance before landing in heavy grass. Although its flight was very similar to the Virginia Rail and the Sora, which I was accustomed to seeing, the light color and white wing patches were very distinctive. Later I checked a field guide and found that the description most closely matching this bird was that of the very secretive Yellow Rail.

I had planned to do some rail and snipe hunting the ...


Female Dominance Among Purple Finches (Carpodacus Purpureus) In Winter Flocks, James W. Popp Oct 1987

Female Dominance Among Purple Finches (Carpodacus Purpureus) In Winter Flocks, James W. Popp

Field Station Bulletins

The dominance of females over males in winter flocks is rare. In this paper, I report on female dominance over males in winter flocks of Purple Finches (Carpodacus purpureus). Females won nearly all observed intersexual encounters and also differed from males in their use of agonistic displays. Female dominance has been reported for other species in the genus Carpodacus, but reasons for the occurrence of female dominance in this genus are unknown.


Three Decades Of Change In Three Southeastern Wisconsin Woodlots, Lawrence A. Leitner Oct 1987

Three Decades Of Change In Three Southeastern Wisconsin Woodlots, Lawrence A. Leitner

Field Station Bulletins

Three upland woodlots in southeastern Wisconsin, originally sampled by the Plant Ecology Lab of UW-Madison in 1949, were resampled in 1981. In general, red and white oaks were being replaced by more shade-tolerant species. Two of the sites, Zirbe's Woods and Petrifying Springs Woods, appear headed for complete domination by sugar maple. Thompson Woods, where maple was absent, was at an earlier successional stage. In Thompson Woods, basswood and white ash were becoming dominant.


Terrestrial Isopods At The Uwm Field Station, Joan P. Jass, Barbara Klausineier Oct 1987

Terrestrial Isopods At The Uwm Field Station, Joan P. Jass, Barbara Klausineier

Field Station Bulletins

Six species of terrestrial isopods were found in a preliminary survey of appropriate habitats at the UWM Field Station. Each species is characterized briefly with distinctive features of its morphology and life cycle.


Nebraska Bird Review (September 1987) 55(3), Whole Issue Sep 1987

Nebraska Bird Review (September 1987) 55(3), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

1987 (Sixty-second) Spring Occurrence·Report … 50

Red Knot and Red Phalarope photographs … 64

Book Reviews … 65

A Nebraska Specimen Record of Clark’s Grebe, Aechmophorus clarkii (Lawrence) … 68

Notes … 72


“Notes” From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1987) 55(3) Sep 1987

“Notes” From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1987) 55(3)

Nebraska Bird Review

FUNK LAGOON. We were at the Funk Lagoon 2 July 1987, toward dusk. We saw two Yellow-crowned Night-Herons, five American Bitterns, two Great Egrets, thirty Great Blue Herons, five Double-crested Cormorants, numerous Coots, Blue-winged Teal, Yellow-headed and Red-winged Blackbirds, Killdeer, a flock of Short-billed Dowitchers, and several unidentified shore birds.—George W. Brown, Kearney

WOOD DUCK CARRYING EGG. On 24 April 1987, Gail Roebuck was hiking along the north Stream Trail in Fontenelle Forest and heard Wood Duck calls. She looked up to see the female carrying something in her bill. The Duck dropped the object along the edge of ...


A Nebraska Specimen Record Of Clark’S Grebe, Aechmophorus Clarkii (Lawrence), Thomas E. Labedz Sep 1987

A Nebraska Specimen Record Of Clark’S Grebe, Aechmophorus Clarkii (Lawrence), Thomas E. Labedz

Nebraska Bird Review

Clark’s Grebe, formerly known as light-phase Western Grebe (Aechmophorus occidentalis clarkii), was elevated to full species status (A. clarkii) in 1985 (American Ornithologists’ Union (AOU) 1983, 1985). This paper presents the first recorded occurrence in Nebraska of Clark’s Grebe and is documented with a specimen. Identification of Clark’s Grebe in the field is discussed, and a comparison is made of the Nebraska specimen with specimen s reported in recent literature.


“Book Reviews” From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1987) 55(3) Sep 1987

“Book Reviews” From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1987) 55(3)

Nebraska Bird Review

Life Histories of North American Diving Birds. A. C. Bent. xiv + 240 + 55 pp. ot photographs. 5.375 x 8.5, Dover Publications, Inc. New York, paper, $6.95. Life Histories of North American Gulls and Terns. A. C. Bent. x + 338 + 93 pages of photographs, 5.375 x 8.5, Dover Publications, Inc. New York, paper $8.95. Dover has reprinted their original reprints of these books in the Bent series with no changes.

Wild Animals I Have Known. Ernest Thompson Seaton. xxvi + 356, 5 x 7.75, Penguin Books, New York, paper, $7.95. If this sounds familiar ...


1987 (Sixty-Second) Spring Occurrence Report Sep 1987

1987 (Sixty-Second) Spring Occurrence Report

Nebraska Bird Review

Two hundred and eighty-eight species are listed in this report, from 19 locations, compared to 304 from 22 locations in 1986, 296 from 22 in 1985, and 293 from 13 in 1984.


Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1987) 55(3) Sep 1987

Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1987) 55(3)

Nebraska Bird Review

Published quarterly in March, June, September, and December, by the Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union, Inc., as its official journal and sent to all members who are not in arrears for dues. Subscriptions (on a calendar year basis only) are $10.00 per year in the United States, $12.00 per year in Canada and Mexico, and $12.50 per year in all other countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $3.00 each, postpaid, in the United States; $3.50 elsewhere.

Memberships (on a calendar year basis only): Students, $3.00; Active $7.00; Sustaining $15.00; Family Active $10.00 ...


Thermoregulation And Sleep: Effects Of Thermal Stress On Sleep Patterns Of Glaucous-Winged Gulls (Larus Glaucescens), Mark Opp, Nigel Ball, Don Miller, Charles Amlaner Jul 1987

Thermoregulation And Sleep: Effects Of Thermal Stress On Sleep Patterns Of Glaucous-Winged Gulls (Larus Glaucescens), Mark Opp, Nigel Ball, Don Miller, Charles Amlaner

Charles J. Amlaner

1. To determine effects of thermal stress on avian sleep patterns, incubating Glaucous-winged gulls were subjected to conditions of heat loss and heat gain via conduction from hollow copper eggs.

2. Heated manipulations resulted in significant reductions in sleep and rest relative to controls, whereas cooled manipulations had little effect.

3. The resilience of sleep to thermal stress is greater than that of rest. We suggest that the incompatability of sleep with conductive processes to off-load heat from the eggs is responsible in this case.

4. Pant Sleep, the behaviour in which birds appear to maintain some the benefits of ...


Distribution Of Vertebrates Of The Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Stanley H. Anderson, Wayne A. Hubert, Craig Patterson, Alan J. Redder, David Duvall Jul 1987

Distribution Of Vertebrates Of The Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Stanley H. Anderson, Wayne A. Hubert, Craig Patterson, Alan J. Redder, David Duvall

Great Basin Naturalist

During a survey of the vertebrates in the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, 46 mammal, 210 bird, 9 reptile, 5 amphibian, and 28 fish species were found. Habitat structure and moisture were two environmental variables associated with species numbers across this 1,820-ha area. Eight distinct habitats were evaluated. In coniferous forests, 27% of the birds and 54% of the mammals were observed. Sagebrush/grasslands and upland shrublands were very arid and had relatively few vertebrates. Five introduced game birds occurred in sagebrush habitat. Riparian and wetland habitats had the largest number of unique vertebrates, 38 and 77 respectively. The ...


1986 Nebraska Nesting Survey, Esther V. Bennett Jun 1987

1986 Nebraska Nesting Survey, Esther V. Bennett

Nebraska Bird Review

Data on the 1986 nesting season in Nebraska were received from 20 observers and one organization, reporting on 67 species from 49 counties. Counties on the tabulation are listed in a west to east order, with the northernmost of the approximately equal locations given first. Numbers represent Nest Record Cards, A (for aliment) represents carrying food; B represents building nest; C represents copulating; E represents eggs; F represents feeding; M represents carrying nesting material; N represents nests observed for which no Nest Record Card was submitted; P represents brood patch; and Y represents young observed. Underlined numbers represent nests reported ...


A Red-Naped Sapsucker In Sioux County, Nebraska, Mark A. Brogie, Ellen L. Brogie Jun 1987

A Red-Naped Sapsucker In Sioux County, Nebraska, Mark A. Brogie, Ellen L. Brogie

Nebraska Bird Review

The Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) has recently been recognized as a valid species (American Ornithologists' Union, 1985). Its inclusion in the avifauna of Nebraska is based on three birds, all taken in September in the northwestern corner of the state during the years 1919 and 1920 (Bray et al. 1986). Bray et al. (1985) give detailed accounts of these specimens and present an over-view of the species in Nebraska. The following, along with being the first spring record of the species in Nebraska, represents the first verified occurrence of this species in the state since 1920.

On the afternoon of ...


Black Rail In Knox County, Nebraska, Mark A. Brogie, Ellen L. Brogie Jun 1987

Black Rail In Knox County, Nebraska, Mark A. Brogie, Ellen L. Brogie

Nebraska Bird Review

BLACK RAIL IN KNOX COUNTY. NEBRASKA

The Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis) is apparently an extremely rare spring and fall migrant in Nebraska (Johnsgard, 1980). No breeding evidence for this species exists for the state. although several field guides show Nebraska at the northern edge of this rail's breeding range. A description of a Black Rail seen 22 April 1980 in Lancaster Co. (NBR 48: 88 is the only accepted record (Class III) of this species in the state (Bray et al., 1986). Whitney et al., 1978) makes no mention of this species for South Dakota. although Iowa has several ...


Insects In Some Nebraska Crops As Food For Pheasant Chicks, R. W. Whitmore, K. P. Pruess, R.E. Gold Jun 1987

Insects In Some Nebraska Crops As Food For Pheasant Chicks, R. W. Whitmore, K. P. Pruess, R.E. Gold

Nebraska Bird Review

Insect biomass was estimated for crops grown on an organic, a dryland, and an irrigated farm from 1 June to 15 July, the time period assumed important for Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) nesting and chick dependence on insect food. Differences due to farming system were not detected. Total insect biomass production during the season was 2,555, 2,173, and 338 mg per square m for oats-sweetclover, oats, and sweetclover, respectively. Leafhoppers were the most abundant insects in oats and oats-sweetclover, with plant bugs the most abundant in sweetclover. Mean standing crop biomass (mg per square m) of only those ...


Macgillivray's Warbler In Cedar County, Nebraska, Mark A. Brogie, David A. Stage Jun 1987

Macgillivray's Warbler In Cedar County, Nebraska, Mark A. Brogie, David A. Stage

Nebraska Bird Review

MacGillivray's Warbler (Oporornis tolmiei) is considered by Johnsgard (1980) to be a rare spring and fall migrant in western Nebraska. with most records from the Panhandle. but reported from as far east as Platte Co. Bray et al (1986) consider it regular and cite a specimen taken in Boone Co.. Whatever the status. this warbler is infrequently encountered in Nebraska. and separating this species from Mourning Warbler (Oporornis philadelphia) can often be difficult. Some authorities believe the two to be conspecific, although Hall (1979) found very few hybrid specimens and Salt (1973) found that they did not respond to ...


Notes- Nebraska Bird Review June 1987 Jun 1987

Notes- Nebraska Bird Review June 1987

Nebraska Bird Review

PELICAN WITH SANDHILLS CRANES. On 17 October 1986, about 1:30 PM, I took a call from Mrs. Darrol Sukraw from Stapleton, who reported a flock of Sandhill Cranes (approximately 100 birds) that contained a single Whooping Crane. After questioning her about the description of the white bird, I felt her observation might be valid and asked her which direction the birds were traveling.

She informed me that the flock had just passed over Stapleton and was flying directly South down highway 83, toward North Platte. This is a distance of about 30 miles. Hoping that I could verify the ...


Nebraska Bird Review June 1987 Volume 55 Number 2 Jun 1987

Nebraska Bird Review June 1987 Volume 55 Number 2

Nebraska Bird Review

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1986 Nebraska Nesting Survey
The Eighty-sixth (1987) Annual Meeting
Insects in Some Nebraska Crops as Food for Pheasant Chicks
A Red-naped Sapsucker in Sioux County, Nebraska
Black Rail in Knox County. Nebraska
MacGillilvray's Warbler in Cedar County, Nebraska
Notes


The Eighty-Sixth (1987) Annual Meeting Jun 1987

The Eighty-Sixth (1987) Annual Meeting

Nebraska Bird Review

The eighty-sixth Annual Meeting was held in Valentine 15, 16, and 17 May, 1987, in conjunction with the South Dakota Ornithologists' Union. A previous joint meeting was held in Yankton, S. D. in 1959. Total attendance at some part of this meeting was 116; 6 who were members of both societies, 57 members of NOU only, 39 members of SDOU only, and 14 nonmembers. Friday night George Vandel, of the SD Game, Fish, and Parks Commission, spoke on the program, sponsored by the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, for the identification and preservation of shorebird habitat. At the ...


Karyotypic Analysis Of Five Rodents And A Marsupial From Belize, Central America, David W. Burton, John W. Bickham, Hugh H. Genoways, Timothy J. Mccarthy May 1987

Karyotypic Analysis Of Five Rodents And A Marsupial From Belize, Central America, David W. Burton, John W. Bickham, Hugh H. Genoways, Timothy J. Mccarthy

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

Karyotypes and chromosomal banding patterns of six species of small mammals from Belize are presented and discussed in light of relevant data in the literature. Individuals of Heteromys desmarestianus had FN values of 72, which differs from previous reports. G-bands were obtained and compared to fluorescent bands (DAPI) and with the location of NOR sites. The karyotypes of Peromyscus mexicanus, Sigmodon hispidus, Oryzomys couesi, and Ototylomys phyllotis are identical to the karyotypes for these species described in the literature. Active NORs were located on four pairs of chromosomes in O. phyllotis and fluorescent bands obtained with the stain Hoechst 33258 ...


Adaptation Of Striped Bass To Sea Water Following Direct Transfer From Freshwater: Morphological, Biochemical, And Physiological Parameters, Judy A. King May 1987

Adaptation Of Striped Bass To Sea Water Following Direct Transfer From Freshwater: Morphological, Biochemical, And Physiological Parameters, Judy A. King

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

There has been heightened interest in the biology of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) because of increased pollution in their native spawning grounds and because of their extensive use in landlocked sport fisheries. Their euryhalinity makes them an excellent species for osmoregulation studies. The objective of this research was to study the rate of adaptation of striped bass gills to sea water (3% salt) after direct transfer from freshwater using biochemical (ion transport enzyme levels), physiological (chloride efflux), and ultrastructural methods. Striped bass have specialized osmoregulatory cells located on the interlamellar and afferent surfaces of their gill filaments as shown by ...