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Zoology

1985

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Index To Volume 53 Dec 1985

Index To Volume 53

Nebraska Bird Review

Accipiter sp. 19

Adcock, Cash and Dorothy 63

Albino 41, 54

Alexander, George and Irene 22

Alfred, Norris 6, 17, 46, 60

Ani, Groove-billed 78

Avocet, American 9, 39(2), 46, 48, 55, 71, 72, 77, 78

. . .

Wright, Rick 3, 18, 22, 41, 42, 44, 57, 68, 70, 82

Wyman, Howard and Wilma 70

Wilma 22

Yellowlegs, Greater 9, 55, 70

Lesser 10, 39, 41, 55

sp. 9, 39

Yellowthroat, Common 15, 39, 46, 63

Zendeh, Scheil 41(2), 43, 82


“Notes” From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1985) 53(4) Dec 1985

“Notes” From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1985) 53(4)

Nebraska Bird Review

FILLMORE COUNTY. On 23 June 1985, while I was atlasing block #IF01 in Fillmore County, just north of Shickley, I saw a Common Moorhen in Weis Lagoon and found a nest with 11 eggs. There was also a very large colony of Black-crowned Night-Herons [and] also a colony of Great-tailed Grackles.—William C. Garthright, Lincoln

RED-NECKED GREBE. On 16 June 1985 1 was wading through some cattails at the edge of a small open area in a pond at the North 27th Street marsh when I came upon a grebe sitting in the open on the water.—William C. Garthright ...


Nesting Observations Of The Piping Plover Near Sioux City, Randall D. Williams Dec 1985

Nesting Observations Of The Piping Plover Near Sioux City, Randall D. Williams

Nebraska Bird Review

From mid-April to early August 1985 members of the Loess Hills Audubon Society monitored the nesting of Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) on fly-ash settling ponds of the IPS Port Neal Generating Station, on the Missouri River near Salix, Iowa. Declining regional and national populations (Barie, 1985; Kaufman, 1984; and Evans, 1985) make the discovery of nesting individuals quite exciting. Piping Plovers were first found at this site in 1984.

The ash ponds appear to be very good nesting habitat (Evans, 1985). There are large areas of gravel-like substrate with little to no vegetation, minimal human disturbance, and an available source ...


The Red-Naped Sapsucker In Nebraska, Tanya E. Bray, Barbara K. Padelford, W. Ross Silcock Dec 1985

The Red-Naped Sapsucker In Nebraska, Tanya E. Bray, Barbara K. Padelford, W. Ross Silcock

Nebraska Bird Review

The Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) was for many years accorded subspecific status within Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyapicus varius), but the American Ornithologists’ Union recently revised this opinion, and now regards nuchalis as a “good” species (Auk 102:680). Red-naped Sapsucker can be added to the Nebraska (species) list on the basis of three specimens in the collection of the University of Nebraska State Museum (UNSM).

The breeding range of Red-naped Sapsucker includes the Rocky Mountains east of the Cascades from southwest Canada south to central Arizona and it winters in much of northern Mexico, north as far as the southern part ...


A Red Phalarope In Pierce County, Nebraska, Mark A. Brogie, Ed M. Brogie Dec 1985

A Red Phalarope In Pierce County, Nebraska, Mark A. Brogie, Ed M. Brogie

Nebraska Bird Review

The Red Phalarope (Phalaropus fulicaria) is seen yearly in the central portion of the United States, from the Great Lakes to Texas. More than 85% of these sightings are from fall, with 75% of the total from September to November (Dinsmore et al., 1984). This species is, however, considered a very rare or accidental migrant through the Plains States (Johnsgard 1980). A single specimen, taken on 15 October 1921 at Dad’s Lake, near Wood Lake in Cherry County (Conover 1934) represents the only previous record of this species in Nebraska. The following represents the first record for this species ...


Black-Necked Stilts Nesting In Nebraska, Mark J. Helsinger Dec 1985

Black-Necked Stilts Nesting In Nebraska, Mark J. Helsinger

Nebraska Bird Review

On 7 May 1985 I saw two adult Black-necked Stilts on Lower Harrison Lake, Crescent Lake NWR, Garden County. In the middle of June photographers Charlie and Rita Summers saw two on Martin Lake. On 11 July I saw two adults. and four young on Martin Lake. The whitish/gray-colored young had long grayish/green legs (3–4") and a black bill, about 2" long. They appeared to be feeding by probing soft mud. The two adults were exhibiting aggressive behavior. One adult dived and screamed at a Blue-winged Teal hen with eight ducklings until they moved from the area ...


Supplement To 1985 Spring Occurrence Report Dec 1985

Supplement To 1985 Spring Occurrence Report

Nebraska Bird Review

The following records were overlooked until it was too late to include them in the original report (NBR 53:50). They are either earlier, later, or new records for the localities listed, most recorded by Rick Wright, but also by Glen Kramer and the Werthmans. April is A, May is M. Four species and a hybrid, all marked +, were not in the first report, so that the total for the state is 296 rather than 292. The Douglas-Sarpy count is increased by two; no attempt was made to get similar figures for the other columns since they would affect only ...


1985 Fall Field Day Dec 1985

1985 Fall Field Day

Nebraska Bird Review

Pleasant weather greeted the 70 people who attended part or all of the 1985 Fall Field Day, at the 4-H Camp at Halsey National Forest, 5 and 6 October. There was a slide show Friday night and the official tally Sunday noon, but other than the scheduled meals, the rest of the time was free for individual birding. The committee on a records committee completed its work and presented its report to the directors. The report was accepted and Tanya Bray, Ruth Green, and Wayne Mollhoff were appointed to 3-year terms on the committee, Alice Kenitz and Barbara Padelford for ...


Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1985) 53(4) Dec 1985

Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (December 1985) 53(4)

Nebraska Bird Review

Published quarterly in March, June, September, and December by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal and sent to all members who are not in arrears for dues. Subscriptions (on calendar year basis only) are $10.00 per year in the United States, $12.00 per year in Canada and Mexico, and $12.50 per year in all other countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $3.00 each, postpaid, in the United States; $3.50 elsewhere.

Memberships (on a calendar year basis only): Student, $3.00; Active, $7.00; Sustaining, $15.00; Family Active, $10.00; Family ...


Nebraska Bird Review (December 1985) 53(4), Whole Issue Dec 1985

Nebraska Bird Review (December 1985) 53(4), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

1985 Fall Field Day … 70

Supplement to 1985 Spring Occurrence Report … 70

Black-necked Stilts Nesting in Nebraska … 72

A Red Phalarope in Pierce County, Nebraska … 72

The Red-naped Sapsucker in Nebraska … 73

Nesting Observations of the Piping Plover near Sioux City … 74

Notes … 76


A Guide To The Natural History Of The Cedarburg Bog: Part 1, James A. Reinartz Oct 1985

A Guide To The Natural History Of The Cedarburg Bog: Part 1, James A. Reinartz

Field Station Bulletins

The boardwalk that extends to the center of the Cedarburg Bog is the UWM Field Station's most heavily used teaching facility. Research is also conducted in the Bog, which holds an understandable fascination for researchers and students of natural history because of its size, complexity, diversity and geographical isolation from similar communities. Because of the increasing research and teaching use of the Bog, it has become essential that some of what is known about the natural history of the Bog be assembled and summarized in an easily accessible introduction and guide. The guide contains too much material to fit ...


Genetic Mapping Of Endogenous Rd-114 Retroviral Sequences Of Domestic Cats, Roger H. Reeves, William G. Nash, Stephen J. O'Brien Oct 1985

Genetic Mapping Of Endogenous Rd-114 Retroviral Sequences Of Domestic Cats, Roger H. Reeves, William G. Nash, Stephen J. O'Brien

Biology Faculty Articles

The RD-114 family of endogenous retroviral sequences in domestic cats has been shown to consist of approximately 20 copies of genetically divergent virogenes per haploid genome. The chromosomal localization for four endogenous sequences (RDV1-4) was accomplished by correlating the occurrence of specific feline chromosomes with diagnostic viral DNA fragments in a panel of cat x rodent somatic cell hybrids. Analysis of the hybrid panel revealed that endogenous RD-114 sequences are dispersed on multiple cat chromosomes, that certain proviral segments are polymorphic with respect to the presence or absence of virus, and that a restriction fragment characteristic of inducible RD-114 resides ...


Nebraska Bird Review (September 1985) 53(3), Whole Issue Sep 1985

Nebraska Bird Review (September 1985) 53(3), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

1984 Nebraska Nesting Survey … 46

1985 (Sixtieth) Spring Occurrence Report … 50

Hybrid Bluebirds in the Pine Ridge … 67

Notes … 67

Book Review … 68


“Book Review” From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1985) 53(3) Sep 1985

“Book Review” From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1985) 53(3)

Nebraska Bird Review

The Bird Identification Calendar, 1986, illustrated in color by John Sill, 11 x 14, Stephen Greene Press in cooperation with The Massachusetts Audubon Society, distributed by Viking Penguin Inc., New York City.

The calendar space is full size; the over 70 illustrations and short paragraphs are on the facing page (back of the previous page). Also, two preliminary pages on bird identification in general.


Hybrid Bluebirds In The Pine Ridge, Barbara L. Wilson, Jim Minyard, Hope Minyard, Tanya Bray Sep 1985

Hybrid Bluebirds In The Pine Ridge, Barbara L. Wilson, Jim Minyard, Hope Minyard, Tanya Bray

Nebraska Bird Review

A hybrid pair of bluebirds is raising young in Dawes County, Nebraska, in the yard of Jim and Hope Minyard, approximately 8 miles south of Crawford. The female of the pair is a Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides). She is basically a dull gray bluebird, with little contrast between upperparts and underparts. There is no rusty or tan on her breast, and no sharp demarcation between the gray breast and the lighter belly. Her rump and the bases of her outer tail feathers are a light, bright blue, while the other tail feathers and the primaries are blackish. When the wing ...


1985 (Sixtieth) Spring Occurrence Report Sep 1985

1985 (Sixtieth) Spring Occurrence Report

Nebraska Bird Review

Two hundred ninety-two species, plus Clark’s Nutcracker, for which no specific dates were reported, and Lapland Longspur, which was not recorded, are listed in this report, from 22 locations. The comparable figures for 1984 are 293 and one possible, from 13 locations; 1983 288 and 2 possibles from 13; and 1982 287 from 15 locations.


1984 Nebraska Nesting Survey, Esther V. Bennett Sep 1985

1984 Nebraska Nesting Survey, Esther V. Bennett

Nebraska Bird Review

Data on the 1984 nesting season in Nebraska were received from 17 observers and organizations, reporting on 72 species from 36 counties or groups of counties. Counties in the tabulations are listed in a west to east order, with the northernmost of the approximately equal locations given first. Numbers represent Nest Record Cards; N represents nests observed for which no Nest Record Card was submitted; F represents feeding; CF represents carrying food; CN represents carrying nesting material; and Y represents young observed. GPC in the following paragraph represents Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. Thirty species were reported on 192 North ...


Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1985) 53(3) Sep 1985

Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1985) 53(3)

Nebraska Bird Review

Published quarterly in March, June, September, and December by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union, Inc., as its official journal and sent to all members who are not in arrears for dues. Subscriptions (on calendar year basis only) are $10.00 per year in the United States, $12.00 per year in Canada and Mexico, and $12.50 per year in all other countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $3.00 each, postpaid, in the United States; $3.50 elsewhere.

Memberships (on a calendar year basis only): Students, $.3.00; Active, $7.00; Sustaining, $15.00; Family Sustaining, $20.00; Life ...


“Notes” From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1985) 53(3) Sep 1985

“Notes” From Nebraska Bird Review (September 1985) 53(3)

Nebraska Bird Review

RE SWAN GEESE IN KEITH COUNTY. A recent account (NBR 53:4) of Chinese Geese (domestic forms of the Swan Goose are called Chinese Geese –Ed.) in Keith County seems to suggest that the birds were of natural occurrence. No wild individuals of this species have ever been reported in North America, however, and it may in fact be declining in its native range. It is exceedingly common, though, in zoos and parks as well as on farms, where it is often only nominally a captive; birds are readily available and are not typically afforded the close watch given more ...


The Hippocampus As Episodic Encoder: Does It Play Tag?, Robert H.I. Dale Sep 1985

The Hippocampus As Episodic Encoder: Does It Play Tag?, Robert H.I. Dale

Scholarship and Professional Work - LAS

Rawlins’s characterization of the hippocampus as a “high-capacity, immediate-term memory store” captures the essential idea in a number of previous models. For example, Gaffan (1974), Gray (1984), Hirsh (1980), Kesner (Bierley, Kesner & Novak 1983), Olton (Olton, Becker & Handelmann 1979), Solomon (1980), and Winocur (1980) all agree that hippocampal animals show memory deficits when required to identify, for whatever reason, one specific event out of a list of recent events. Although these authors disagree on a number of details, Rawlins has identified their models common ground, the core of each model. (It is only fair to note that Gaffan has considerably modified his ideas about the hippocampus; cf. Gaffan, Saunders, Gaffan, Harrison, Shields & Owen 1984.)


High Rates Of Photosynthesis In The Desert Shrub Chrysothamnus Nauseosus Ssp. Albicaulis, Tim D. Davis, N. Sankhla, W. R. Andersen, D. J. Weber, B. N. Smith Jul 1985

High Rates Of Photosynthesis In The Desert Shrub Chrysothamnus Nauseosus Ssp. Albicaulis, Tim D. Davis, N. Sankhla, W. R. Andersen, D. J. Weber, B. N. Smith

Great Basin Naturalist

Basic aspects of photosynthesis were investigated in white rubber rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus (Pallas) Britt. ssp. albicaulis), a common C3 deciduous shrub native to arid regions of the western U.S. Under favorable field conditions, net photosynthesis (Pn) ranged from 36 to 73 mg CO2 · dm −2 · hr−1, which is relatively high for a woody species. The leaves from the actively growing flowering shoots exhibited higher Pn than those on the vegetative shoots. Pn also varied according to the age of the leaves and the location of the plants. Pn did not light saturate ...


“Notes” From Nebraska Bird Review (June 1985) 53(2) Jun 1985

“Notes” From Nebraska Bird Review (June 1985) 53(2)

Nebraska Bird Review

DESOTO NWR. Our Independent Science Research class at Laurel-Concord High School, led by Ed Brogie, took a field trip to DeSoto NWR 3 November 1984. We spotted two species listed as “rare” on the NWR checklist: Western Grebe and Lesser Golden-Plover; and one not listed for fall: Water Pipit.—Paul L. Pearson, Wakefield

CLAY COUNTY. Here are some observations Joe Gabig, Ross Lock, and I made 22 September 1984 at Harvard Marsh, just west of the town of Harvard.

NATIONAL WILDLIFE FEDERATION MIDWINTER EAGLE SURVEY. The NWF survey was initiated in January 1979 as a means of monitoring the nation ...


The Eighty-Fourth Annual Meeting Jun 1985

The Eighty-Fourth Annual Meeting

Nebraska Bird Review

About 75 people participated in at least one of the events at the eighty-fourth Annual Meeting, held 18 and 19 May 1985 at the Eastern Nebraska 4-H Camp, adjacent to Schramm State Park, between Louisville and Gretna, in Sarpy County. There was the usual slide show Friday night. Saturday morning was available for birding. In the afternoon the following papers were presented:

Waterfowl Production in the Rainwater Basins—Robin Harding, Department of Biology, Kearney State College

Age and Reproductive Success in Northern Orioles—Thomas Labedz, Nebraska State Museum

A Comparative Analysis of Long-eared Owl Pellets—Russell Benedict and Ray Korpi ...


Observations Of The Barred Owl In Southeastern Nebraska, Steve Shupe Jun 1985

Observations Of The Barred Owl In Southeastern Nebraska, Steve Shupe

Nebraska Bird Review

The status of the Barred Owl (Strix varia) in Nebraska has been questioned for several years. The concern rests mainly with the continued depletion of deep forest habitat which has threatened the very existence of this magnificent raptor. During a three-year study of the Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) and Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Barred Owls were encountered at various times. It seemed appropriate to accumulate some data on the birds; however, because of their precarious status only limited ecological information was collected.

In 1983 seven nest sites were located within the study area (approximately 76 square miles of northeastern ...


Possible Addition Of The Prairie Skink To The Diet Of The Grackle, Louis A. Somma Jun 1985

Possible Addition Of The Prairie Skink To The Diet Of The Grackle, Louis A. Somma

Nebraska Bird Review

On 8 June 1984, at the intersection of California Street and the Union Pacific RR tracks, just west of Saddle Creek Road in Omaha, a Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscala) was seen flying approximately 2 m above the observer, with a large adult prairie skink, (Eumeces septentrionalis) (Reptilia; Sauria) in its bill. The Grackle had difficulty flying, since the skink was somewhat heavy and struggling violently, The Grackle dropped to the ground about 7 m away and released the lizard. The skink lay on its back, twitching slightly. The distal half of its tail was missing. The lack of male breeding ...


Nebraska Bird Review (June 1985) 53(2), Whole Issue Jun 1985

Nebraska Bird Review (June 1985) 53(2), Whole Issue

Nebraska Bird Review

The Historic Breeding Distribution of the Least Tern in Nebraska … 26

Possible Addition of the Prairie Skink to the Diet of the Common Grackle … 36

Observations of the Barred Owl in Southeastern Nebraska … 37

The Eighty-fourth Annual Meeting … 38

Notes … 39


Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (June 1985) 53(2) Jun 1985

Masthead From Nebraska Bird Review (June 1985) 53(2)

Nebraska Bird Review

Published quarterly in March, June, September, and December, by the Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union, Inc., as its official journal and sent to all members who are not in arrears for dues. Subscriptions (on a calendar-year basis only) are $10.00 per year in the United States, $12.00 per year in Canada and Mexico, and $12.50 per year in all other countries, payable in advance. Single copies are $3.00 each, postpaid, in the United States, $3.50 elsewhere.

Memberships (on a calendar-year basis only): Students, $3.00; Active, $7.00; Sustaining, $15.00; Family Active, $10.00; Family Sustaining ...


Natural Tree Reproduction In Urban Environments, John Boyd, Forest Stearns Apr 1985

Natural Tree Reproduction In Urban Environments, John Boyd, Forest Stearns

Field Station Bulletins

Three contrasting urban areas in Milwaukee County were sampled to determine the tree species reproducing and the habitats in which seedlings become established. Habitats most favorable for seedling establishment were shrub hedges and areas along fence lines or adjacent to buildings. Overall, elm and ash were the taxa most successful in establishing seedlings. In the Menomonee Valley, seedlings of boxelder and tree-of-heaven were most abundant with elm and ash close behind, while in Shorewood and Brown Deer, a great variety of seedlings was present. Elm, ash, boxelder, Norway maple, buckthorn, cherry and mountain ash were the most prevalent. Successful seedling ...


Labrador Tea (Ledum Groelandicum) In The Cedarburg Bog, James A. Reinartz Apr 1985

Labrador Tea (Ledum Groelandicum) In The Cedarburg Bog, James A. Reinartz

Field Station Bulletins

The Labrador tea population in the Cedarburg Bog is a southern outlyer from its more northerly range and is disjunct by at least 40 miles from the nearest population. The discovery of Labrador tea in the Bog raises to 11 the number of vascular plants that reach their absolute southernmost Wisconsin boundaries in the Cedarburg Bog (5 dicots, 5 monocots, 1 gymnosperm). It raises the number of vascular plants at, or near, the southern edge of their range in the Cedarburg Bog to at least 35.


Wintering Populations Of Juncos At The Uwm Field Station, Charles M. Weise Apr 1985

Wintering Populations Of Juncos At The Uwm Field Station, Charles M. Weise

Field Station Bulletins

Since 1966 the winter populations of Dark-eyed Juncos, Junco hyemalis at the UWM Field Station have been monitored by mark-recapture methods. Schnabel estimates with 95% confidence intervals are presented for each winter. The population has varied irregularly between 60 and 196. Comparisons of these estimates with Wisconsin Christmas Bird Counts of juncos reveals a positive correlation with the average number of juncos per Wisconsin Christmas Bird Count, indicating that the year-to-year fluctuations at the Field Station correspond to the general state-wide fluctuations. However, the Christmas counts show a rising trend over the past 19 years while the Field Station population ...