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Distribution Extension Of Aspiculuris Americana Parasite Of Peromyscus Difficilis In Hidalgo, Mexico, Griselda Pulido-Flores, Scott Monks, Jorge Falcón-Ordaz Jan 2019

Distribution Extension Of Aspiculuris Americana Parasite Of Peromyscus Difficilis In Hidalgo, Mexico, Griselda Pulido-Flores, Scott Monks, Jorge Falcón-Ordaz

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

English: As a part of an ongoing project to inventory the helminth parasites of rodents in Mexico, 30 individuals of Aspiculuris americana were collected inhabiting the intestine from three specimens of the rock mouse Peromyscus difficilis, collected from Cerro Xihuingo, Municipality of Tepeapulco, Hidalgo State, Mexico. This species of nematode parasite different species of the genus Peromyscus (P. gossypinus, P. leucopus, P. maniculatus, and P. floridanus) distributed from Yukon Territory in Canada to Florida in the United States of America. This is the first report of Aspiculuris americana in a Mexican endemic rodent, widening the known distribution of the species ...


Museum Metabarcoding: A Novel Method Revealing Gut Helminth Communities Of Small Mammals Across Space And Time, Stephen E. Greiman, Joseph A. Cook, Vasyl V. Tkach, Eric P. Hoberg, Damian M. Menning, Andrew G. Hope, Sarah A. Sonsthagen, Sandra L. Talbot Nov 2018

Museum Metabarcoding: A Novel Method Revealing Gut Helminth Communities Of Small Mammals Across Space And Time, Stephen E. Greiman, Joseph A. Cook, Vasyl V. Tkach, Eric P. Hoberg, Damian M. Menning, Andrew G. Hope, Sarah A. Sonsthagen, Sandra L. Talbot

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Natural history collections spanning multiple decades provide fundamental historical baselines to measure and understand changing biodiversity. New technologies such as next generation DNA sequencing have considerably increased the potential of museum specimens to address significant questions regarding the impact of environmental changes on host and parasite/pathogen dynamics. We developed a new technique to identify intestinal helminth parasites and applied it to shrews (Eulipotyphla: Soricidae) because they are ubiquitous, occupy diverse habitats, and host a diverse and abundant parasite fauna. Notably, we included museum specimens preserved in various ways to explore the efficacy of using metabarcoding analyses that may enable ...


The Leishmania Years At Unl (Or, My Life As A Cell Biologist, 1966-1981), John J. Janovy Jr. Jan 2015

The Leishmania Years At Unl (Or, My Life As A Cell Biologist, 1966-1981), John J. Janovy Jr.

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Slides for a talk during which Professor Janovy discussed the methods he used in researching Leishmania during the years 1966-1981. Includes lists of references.


Hymenolepis Folkertsi N. Sp. (Eucestoda: Hymenolepididae) In The Oldfield Mouse Peromyscus Polionotus (Wagner) (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Neotominae) From The Southeastern Nearctic With Comments On Tapeworm Faunal Diversity Among Deer Mice, Arseny A. Makarikov, Todd N. Nims, Kurt E. Galbreath, Eric P. Hoberg Jan 2015

Hymenolepis Folkertsi N. Sp. (Eucestoda: Hymenolepididae) In The Oldfield Mouse Peromyscus Polionotus (Wagner) (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Neotominae) From The Southeastern Nearctic With Comments On Tapeworm Faunal Diversity Among Deer Mice, Arseny A. Makarikov, Todd N. Nims, Kurt E. Galbreath, Eric P. Hoberg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

A previously unrecognized species of hymenolepidid cestode attributable to Hymenolepis is described based on specimens in Peromyscus polionotus, oldfield mouse, from Georgia, United States, near the southeastern coast of continental North America. Specimens of Hymenolepis folkertsi n. sp. differ from those attributed to most other species in the genus by having testes arranged in a triangle and a scolex with a prominent rostrum-like protrusion. The newly recognized species is further distinguished by the relative position and length of the cirrus sac, shape of seminal receptacle, and relative size of external seminal vesicle and seminal receptacle. Hymenolepidid cestodes have sporadically been ...


New Species Of Ctenomys Blainville 1826 (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) From The Lowlands And Central Valleys Of Bolivia, Scott Lyell Gardner, Jorge Salazar-Bravo, Joseph A. Cook Jun 2014

New Species Of Ctenomys Blainville 1826 (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) From The Lowlands And Central Valleys Of Bolivia, Scott Lyell Gardner, Jorge Salazar-Bravo, Joseph A. Cook

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

The genus Ctenomys Blainville 1826 is one of the most diverse of South American hystricognath rodents. Currently, nine species of tuco-tucos are reported from Bolivia, four at elevations above 2,000 m and five inhabiting the lowlands (< 1,000 m). In the present paper, morphology, karyology, and phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences for a mitochondrial locus were used to assess the taxonomic status of specimens of Ctenomys from localities beyond the previously known ranges of these rodents in the departments of Chuquisaca, Cochabamba, Santa Cruz, and Tarija. Based on these analyses, we describe four new species in the genus Ctenomys, all apparently endemic to the country. In addition, we place Ctenomys goodfellowi Thomas 1921 in synonymy under C. boliviensis Waterhouse 1848 and confirm the presence of C. nattereri Wagner ...


Hymenolepis Robertrauschi N. Sp. From Grasshopper Mice Onychomys Spp. In New Mexico And Nebraska, U.S.A., Scott Lyell Gardner, Brent A. Luedders, Donald W. Duszynski Mar 2014

Hymenolepis Robertrauschi N. Sp. From Grasshopper Mice Onychomys Spp. In New Mexico And Nebraska, U.S.A., Scott Lyell Gardner, Brent A. Luedders, Donald W. Duszynski

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

From 1989 through 1998, a total of 358 grasshopper mice were collected and examined for helminth and protistan parasites from several habitat types on the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in New Mexico, U.S.A. Of these, 205 individuals were identified as Onychomys leucogaster (Wied-Neuwied 1841) and 153 individuals were classified as O. arenicola Mearns 1896. Many individuals of Onychomys were infected with a new species of Hymenolepididae (Hymenolepis robertrauschi), which is herein described, illustrated, and compared with all species of Nearctic Hymenolepis s. str. Hymenolepis robertrauschi was found in 26% of the individuals of O. arenicola ...


Redescription Of Oligacanthorhynchus Microcephalus (Rudolphi, 1819) Schmidt 1972 (Syn. Oligacanthorhynchus Tortuosa (Leidy, 1850) Schmidt 1972) (Acanthocephala: Oligacanthorhynchidae), Dennis J. Richardson, Scott Lyell Gardner, Jonathan W. Allen Jr. Jan 2014

Redescription Of Oligacanthorhynchus Microcephalus (Rudolphi, 1819) Schmidt 1972 (Syn. Oligacanthorhynchus Tortuosa (Leidy, 1850) Schmidt 1972) (Acanthocephala: Oligacanthorhynchidae), Dennis J. Richardson, Scott Lyell Gardner, Jonathan W. Allen Jr.

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Oligacanthorhynchus microcephalus (Rudolphi, 1819) Schmidt, 1972 was originally described from the philander opossum Caluromys philander from Brazil. Oligacanthorhynchus tortuosa (Leidy, 1850) Schmidt, 1972 was originally described from the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in North America. Six years after describing O. tortuosa, Leidy indicated the synonomy of O. tortuosa with O. microcephalus. This taxonomic view persisted for decades until Van Cleave, in 1924, recognized the validity of O. tortuosa, apparently without examining the type material of O. microcephalus. Subsequent workers have recognized two species of Oligacanthorhynchus from New World opossums: O. microcephalus from South American opossums and O. tortuosa from North ...


Resurrection And Redescription Of Varestrongylus Alces (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae), A Lungworm Of The Eurasian Moose (Alces Alces), With Report On Associated Pathology, Guilherme G. Verocai, Eric P. Hoberg, Turid Vikøren, Kjell Handeland, Bjørnar Ytrehus, Andrew M. Rezansoff, Rebecca K. Davidson, John S. Gilleard, Susan J. Kutz Jan 2014

Resurrection And Redescription Of Varestrongylus Alces (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae), A Lungworm Of The Eurasian Moose (Alces Alces), With Report On Associated Pathology, Guilherme G. Verocai, Eric P. Hoberg, Turid Vikøren, Kjell Handeland, Bjørnar Ytrehus, Andrew M. Rezansoff, Rebecca K. Davidson, John S. Gilleard, Susan J. Kutz

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Background: Varestrongylus alces, a lungworm in Eurasian moose from Europe has been considered a junior synonym of Varestrongylus capreoli, in European roe deer, due to a poorly detailed morphological description and the absence of a type-series.

Methods: Specimens used in the redescription were collected from lesions in the lungs of Eurasian moose, from Vestby, Norway. Specimens were described based on comparative morphology and integrated approaches. Molecular identification was based on PCR, cloning and sequencing of the ITS-2 region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Phylogenetic analysis compared V. alces ITS-2 sequences to these of other Varestrongylus species and other protostrongylids.

Results ...


Varestrongylus Eleguneniensis Sp. N. (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae): A Widespread, Multi-Host Lungworm Of Wild North American Ungulates, With An Emended Diagnosis For The Genus And Explorations Of Biogeography, Guilherme G. Verocai, Susan J. Kutz, Manon Simard, Eric P. Hoberg Jan 2014

Varestrongylus Eleguneniensis Sp. N. (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae): A Widespread, Multi-Host Lungworm Of Wild North American Ungulates, With An Emended Diagnosis For The Genus And Explorations Of Biogeography, Guilherme G. Verocai, Susan J. Kutz, Manon Simard, Eric P. Hoberg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Background: A putative new species of Varestrongylus has been recently recognized in wild North American ungulates based on the ITS-2 sequences of larvae isolated from feces during a wide geographic survey. No taxonomic description was provided, as adult specimens were not examined. Methods: Lungworm specimens were collected in the terminal bronchioles of muskoxen from Quebec, and a woodland caribou from central Alberta, Canada. The L3 stage was recovered from experimentally infected slugs (Deroceras spp.). Description of specimens was based on comparative morphology and integrated approaches. Molecular identity was determined by PCR and sequencing of the ITS-2 region of the nuclear ...


Sylvatic Species Of Echinococcus From Rodent Intermediate Hosts In Asia And South America, Scott Lyell Gardner, Altangerel T. Dursahinhan, Gábor R. Rácz, Nyamsuren Batsaikhan, Sumiya Ganzorig, David S. Tinnin, Darmaa Damdinbazar, Charles Wood, A. Townsend Peterson, Erika Alandia, José Luís Mollericona, Jorge Salazar-Bravo Oct 2013

Sylvatic Species Of Echinococcus From Rodent Intermediate Hosts In Asia And South America, Scott Lyell Gardner, Altangerel T. Dursahinhan, Gábor R. Rácz, Nyamsuren Batsaikhan, Sumiya Ganzorig, David S. Tinnin, Darmaa Damdinbazar, Charles Wood, A. Townsend Peterson, Erika Alandia, José Luís Mollericona, Jorge Salazar-Bravo

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

During a global survey of the diversity of vertebrates and their parasites including the Gobi and desert/steppe biomes ranging from south central to western Mongolia, we found metacestodes (larvae) of Echinococcus multilocularis (Leuckart 1863) in the liver of an individual vole (Microtus limnophilus Büchner 1889) collected in grassland habitat at Har Us Lake, southeast of Hovd, Mongolia. Positive identification of E. multilocularis from near Hovd was made via comparative cyst morphology, study of hooks from the rostellum derived from protoscolexes, and DNA sequencing of the COX1 mitochondrial gene extracted from tissue of the cysts frozen in the field. This ...


Pritchardia Boliviensis N. Gen., N. Sp. (Anoplocephalidae: Linstowinae), A Tapeworm From Opossums (Didelphidae) In The Yungas And Lowlands Of Bolivia And Atlantic Forest Of Paraguay, Scott Lyell Gardner, F. Agustín Jiménez Ruiz, Mariel L. Campbell Oct 2013

Pritchardia Boliviensis N. Gen., N. Sp. (Anoplocephalidae: Linstowinae), A Tapeworm From Opossums (Didelphidae) In The Yungas And Lowlands Of Bolivia And Atlantic Forest Of Paraguay, Scott Lyell Gardner, F. Agustín Jiménez Ruiz, Mariel L. Campbell

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Pritchardia boliviensis n. gen. n. sp. (Anoplocephalidae: Linstowiinae) is described from marsupials (Marmosops noctivagus, Metachirus nudicaudatus, Gracilinanus sp.) collected in Bolivia and Paraguay. These cestodes have a very small strobila with only three segments, regularly alternating genital pores, genital ducts crossing excretory canals ventrally, ovoid to pyriform cirrus sac, three to five testes, external seminal vesicle present and separated from cirrus sac by long seminal duct surrounded by glandular material, uterus ephemeral, eggs forming rapidly in gravid segments, and seminal receptacle present. Pritchardia boliviensis n. sp. includes a single species that occurs in small marsupials in the family Didelphidae of ...


Distribution Extension Of Escherbothrium Molinae Berman And Brooks, 1994 (Cestoda: Tetraphyllidea: Triloculariidae) In Urotrygon Sp. From The Pacific Coast Of Mexico, Francisco Zaragoza-Tapia, Scott Monks, Griselda Pulido-Flores, Juan Violante-González Oct 2013

Distribution Extension Of Escherbothrium Molinae Berman And Brooks, 1994 (Cestoda: Tetraphyllidea: Triloculariidae) In Urotrygon Sp. From The Pacific Coast Of Mexico, Francisco Zaragoza-Tapia, Scott Monks, Griselda Pulido-Flores, Juan Violante-González

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Cestodes collected from the spiral valves of the stingray Urotrygon sp. from the Pacific coast of Mexico were identified as Escherbothrium molinae Berman and Brooks, 1994. The first report of the species was from the Gulf of Nicoya and the Guanacaste coast, Costa Rica; this work represents the second report of the species since the original description and extends its distribution north to Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico.


A New Species Of Metathelazia (Nematoda: Pneumospiruridae) From The Lungs Of A Nine-Banded Armadillo In Central Mexico = Especie Nueva De Metathelazia (Nematoda: Pneumospiruridae) De Los Pulmones De Un Armadillo Del Centro De México, F. Agustín Jiménez-Ruiz, Rogelio Rosas-Valdez, Scott Lyell Gardner Jan 2013

A New Species Of Metathelazia (Nematoda: Pneumospiruridae) From The Lungs Of A Nine-Banded Armadillo In Central Mexico = Especie Nueva De Metathelazia (Nematoda: Pneumospiruridae) De Los Pulmones De Un Armadillo Del Centro De México, F. Agustín Jiménez-Ruiz, Rogelio Rosas-Valdez, Scott Lyell Gardner

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Twenty-four worms were collected from the bronchioles in both lungs of a male nine-banded armadillo Dasypus novemcinctus Linnaeus, 1758 captured in Teacalco, Morelos, Mexico. The worms, herein named Metathelazia mexicana n. sp., show a constriction in the esophagus at the level of the nerve ring; males of the species have 7 pairs of papillae, fewer than the other species in the genus. Metathelazia capsulata is the most similar species to Metathelazia mexicana; however, the latter has much shorter spicules. This is the fourth species in the genus known to occur in the New World.

Se recolectó un total de 24 ...


On The Morphology And Taxonomy Of Griphobilharzia Amoena Platt And Blair, 1991 (Schistosomatoidea), A Dioecious Digenetic Trematode Parasite Of The Freshwater Crocodile, Crocodylus Johnstoni, In Australia [Critical Comment], Thomas R. Platt, Eric P. Hoberg, Leslie A. Chisholm Jan 2013

On The Morphology And Taxonomy Of Griphobilharzia Amoena Platt And Blair, 1991 (Schistosomatoidea), A Dioecious Digenetic Trematode Parasite Of The Freshwater Crocodile, Crocodylus Johnstoni, In Australia [Critical Comment], Thomas R. Platt, Eric P. Hoberg, Leslie A. Chisholm

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Griphobilharzia amoena Platt and Blair, 1991 was originally described was originally described as a dioecious trematode, parasitic in the circulatory system of the Australian freshwater crocodile, Crocodylus johnstoni, with the female completely enclosed in a gynecophoric chamber of the male and the two worms orientated anti-parallel to each other. A recent publication questions the original description, arguing that G. amoena is monoecious and, as a consequence, the species was transferred to Vasotrema Stunkard, 1928 (Spirorchiidae) as Vasotrema amoena n. comb. We provide photomicrographic evidence that the original description of G. amoena is correct and that Griphobilharzia Platt and Blair, 1991 ...


Climate's Role In Polar Bear Past [Letters], Kurt E. Galbreath, Joseph A. Cook, Eric P. Hoberg Jun 2012

Climate's Role In Polar Bear Past [Letters], Kurt E. Galbreath, Joseph A. Cook, Eric P. Hoberg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Striking temporal concordance between the new date for divergence of polar bears and persistent freezing of the Arctic Ocean suggests that this may be one of relatively few instances in which a specific paleoclimatological episode can be convincingly linked to a specific evolutionary event, and it provides vivid demonstration of climatic forcing as a determinant of diversification in biological systems.


A New Genus And Species Of Lungworm (Nemata: Metastrongyloidea) From Akodon Mollis Thomas, 1894 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) In Peru, Maria Elizabeth Morales, Scott Lyell Gardner, John E. Ubelaker Jan 2012

A New Genus And Species Of Lungworm (Nemata: Metastrongyloidea) From Akodon Mollis Thomas, 1894 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) In Peru, Maria Elizabeth Morales, Scott Lyell Gardner, John E. Ubelaker

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Akodonema luzsarmientae n.g., n.sp. (Nemata: Metastrongyloidea) is described from the pulmonary arteries and heart from several individuals of "soft grass mouse," Akodon mollis (Rodentia: Cricetidae), collected in the region of Ancash, Peru. The new genus and species is distinguished by a reduction of the dorsal ray to two small widely separated papillae.


Four Events Of Host Switching In Aspidoderidae (Nematoda) Involve Convergent Lineages Of Mammals, F. Agustín Jiménez-Ruiz, Scott Lyell Gardner, Graciela Navone, Guillermo Ortí Jan 2012

Four Events Of Host Switching In Aspidoderidae (Nematoda) Involve Convergent Lineages Of Mammals, F. Agustín Jiménez-Ruiz, Scott Lyell Gardner, Graciela Navone, Guillermo Ortí

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

The Great American Interchange resulted in the mixing of faunistic groups with different origins and evolutionary trajectories that underwent rapid diversification in North and South America. As a result, groups of animals of recent arrival converged into similar habits and formed ecological guilds with some of the endemics. We present a reconstruction of the evolutionary events in Aspidoderidae, a family of nematodes that infect mammals that are part of this interchange, i.e., dasypodids, opossums, and sigmodontine, geomyid, and hystricognath rodents. By treating hosts as discrete states of character and using parsimony and Bayesian inferences to optimize these traits into ...


New Species Of Arostrilepis (Eucestoda: Hymenolepididae) In Members Of Cricetidae And Geomyidae (Rodentia) From The Western Nearctic, Arseny A. Makarikov, Scott Lyell Gardner, Eric P. Hoberg Jan 2012

New Species Of Arostrilepis (Eucestoda: Hymenolepididae) In Members Of Cricetidae And Geomyidae (Rodentia) From The Western Nearctic, Arseny A. Makarikov, Scott Lyell Gardner, Eric P. Hoberg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Specimens originally identified as Arostrilepis horrida from the Nearctic are revised, contributing to the recognition of a complex of cryptic species distributed across the Holarctic region. Previously unrecognized species are described based on specimens in cricetid (Neotominae) and geomyid rodents. Arostrilepis mariettavogeae n. sp. in Peromyscus californicus from Monterey County, California, and Arostrilepis schilleri n. sp. in Thomomys bulbivorus from Corvallis, Oregon, are characterized. Consistent with recent studies defining diversity in the genus, form, size, and spination (pattern, shape, and size) of the cirrus are diagnostic; species are further distinguished by the relative position and length of the cirrus sac ...


A New Species Of Molinema (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) In Bolivian Rodents And Emended Description Of Litomosoides Esslingeri Bain, Petit, And Diagne, 1989, Juliana Notarnicola, F. Agustin Jimenez Ruiz, Scott Lyell Gardner Jan 2012

A New Species Of Molinema (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) In Bolivian Rodents And Emended Description Of Litomosoides Esslingeri Bain, Petit, And Diagne, 1989, Juliana Notarnicola, F. Agustin Jimenez Ruiz, Scott Lyell Gardner

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

We report the distribution of 2 species of filarioid nematodes occurring in different hosts in the central region of South America. Molinema boliviensis n. sp. was recorded as a parasite of sigmodontine and echymyid rodents in Bolivia, and Litomosoides esslingeri was recorded in sigmodontine and ctenomyid rodents from Bolivia and Argentina. Molinema boliviensis n. sp. shares several similarities with other species reported in spiny rats; however, it can be easily differentiated by the presence of a flat anterior end, gradually tapering lappets and a tubercle present in posterior end, a short, uniform buccal capsule, an oval-shaped vagina vera, and a ...


Four Events Of Host Switching In Aspidoderidae (Nematoda) Involve Convergent Lineages Of Mammals, F. Agustin Jimenez Ruiz, Scott Lyell Gardner, Graciela Teresa Navone Jan 2012

Four Events Of Host Switching In Aspidoderidae (Nematoda) Involve Convergent Lineages Of Mammals, F. Agustin Jimenez Ruiz, Scott Lyell Gardner, Graciela Teresa Navone

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

The Great American Interchange resulted in the mixing of faunistic groups with different origins and evolutionary trajectories that underwent rapid diversification in North and South America. As a result, groups of animals of recent arrival converged into similar habits and formed ecological guilds with some of the endemics. We present a reconstruction of the evolutionary events in Aspidoderidae, a family of nematodes that infect mammals that are part of this interchange, i.e., dasypodids, opossums, and sigmodontine, geomyid, and hystricognath rodents. By treating hosts as discrete states of character and using parsimony and Bayesian inferences to optimize these traits into ...


Return To Beringia: Parasites Reveal Cryptic Biogeographic History Of North American Pikas, Kurt E. Galbreath, Eric P. Hoberg Jan 2012

Return To Beringia: Parasites Reveal Cryptic Biogeographic History Of North American Pikas, Kurt E. Galbreath, Eric P. Hoberg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Traditional concepts of the Bering Land Bridge as a zone of predominantly eastward expansion from Eurasia and a staging area for subsequent colonization of lower latitudes in North America led to early inferences regarding biogeographic histories of North American faunas, many of which remain untested. Here we apply a host–parasite comparative phylogeographical (HPCP) approach to evaluate one such history, by testing competing biogeographic hypotheses for five lineages of host-specific parasites shared by the collared pika (Ochotona collaris) and American pika (Ochotona princeps) of North America. We determine whether the southern host species (O. princeps) was descended from a northern ...


Discovery And Description Of The "Davtiani" Morphotype For Teladorsagia Boreoarcticus (Trichostrongyloidea: Ostertagiinae) Abomasal Parasites In Muskoxen, Ovibos Moschatus, And Caribou, Rangifer Tarandus, From The North American Arctic: Implications For Parasite Faunal Diversity, Eric P. Hoberg, Arthur Abrams, Patricia A. Pilitt, Susan J. Kutz Jan 2012

Discovery And Description Of The "Davtiani" Morphotype For Teladorsagia Boreoarcticus (Trichostrongyloidea: Ostertagiinae) Abomasal Parasites In Muskoxen, Ovibos Moschatus, And Caribou, Rangifer Tarandus, From The North American Arctic: Implications For Parasite Faunal Diversity, Eric P. Hoberg, Arthur Abrams, Patricia A. Pilitt, Susan J. Kutz

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Collections to explore helminth diversity among free-ranging ungulates in the North American Arctic revealed the occurrence of a third male, or "davtiani," morphotype for Teladorsagia boreoarcticus. Designated as T. boreoarcticus forma (f.) minor B, the males occurred with T. boreoarcticus f. major and T. borearcticus f. minor A in endemic populations of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus wardi) and barrenground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) on Victoria Island, Nunavut, Canada, and in muskoxen and Peary caribou (Rangifer tarandus pearyi) on Banks Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. These specimens differ from conspecific morphotypes in the structure of the genital cone and Sjöberg’s organ. Relative ...


Discovery And Description Of A New Trichostrongyloid Species (Nematoda: Ostertagiinaw), Abomasal Parasites In Mountain Goat, Oreamnos Americanus, From The Western Cordillera Of North America [With Erratum], Eric P. Hoberg, Arthur Abrams, Patricia A. Pilitt, Emily J. Jenkins Jan 2012

Discovery And Description Of A New Trichostrongyloid Species (Nematoda: Ostertagiinaw), Abomasal Parasites In Mountain Goat, Oreamnos Americanus, From The Western Cordillera Of North America [With Erratum], Eric P. Hoberg, Arthur Abrams, Patricia A. Pilitt, Emily J. Jenkins

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Marshallagia lichtenfelsi sp. n. is a dimorphic ostertagiine nematode occurring in the abomasum of mountain goats, Oreamnos americanus, from the Western Cordillera of North America. Major and minor morphotype males and females are characterized and distinguished relative to the morphologically similar Marshallagia marshalli/Marshallagia occidentalis from North America and Marshallagia dentispicularis, along with other congeners, from the Palearctic region. The configuration of the convoluted and irregular synlophe in the cervical region of males and females of M. lichtenfelsi is apparently unique, contrasting with a continuous and parallel system of ridges among those species of Marshallagia, including M. marshalli/M. occidentalis ...


Muellerius Capillaris Dominates The Lungworm Community Of Bighorn Sheep At The National Bison Range, Montana, Vanessa O. Ezenwa, Alicia M. Hines, Elizabeth A. Archie, Eric P. Hoberg, Ingrid M. Asmundsson, John T. Hogg Jan 2010

Muellerius Capillaris Dominates The Lungworm Community Of Bighorn Sheep At The National Bison Range, Montana, Vanessa O. Ezenwa, Alicia M. Hines, Elizabeth A. Archie, Eric P. Hoberg, Ingrid M. Asmundsson, John T. Hogg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Lungworm infections are common among bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) in North America, and the predominant species reported are Protostrongylus stilesi and P. rushi. The only records of another lungworm species, Muellerius capillaris, infecting bighorns come from South Dakota, USA. At the National Bison Range (NBR), Montana, USA we found that across six sampling periods, 100% of wild bighorn sheep surveyed were passing first-stage dorsal-spined larvae (DSL) which appeared to be consistent with M. capillaris. By contrast, only 39%or fewer sheep were passing Protostrongylus larvae. Using molecular techniques, we positively identified the DSL from the NBR bighorns as M. capillaris ...


Where Are The Parasites? [Letters], Susan J. Kutz, Andy P. Dobson, Eric P. Hoberg Nov 2009

Where Are The Parasites? [Letters], Susan J. Kutz, Andy P. Dobson, Eric P. Hoberg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

First paragraph:

The review by E. Post et al. ("Ecological dynamics across the Arctic associated with recent climate change," 11 September 2009, p. 1,355) paid little heed to parasites and other pathogens. The rapidly growing literature on parasites in arctic and subarctic ecosystems provides empirical and observational evidence that climate-linked changes have already occurred. The life cycle of the protostrongylid lungworm of muskoxen, Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis, has changed, and the range of that organism and the winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus, has expanded.


Endoparasites Of Fat-Tailed Mouse Opossums (Thylamys: Didelphidae) From Northwestern Argentina And Southern Bolivia, With The Description Of A New Species Of Tapeworm, F. Agustin Jimenez Ruiz, Janet K. Braun, Mariel Campbell, Scott Lyell Gardner Oct 2008

Endoparasites Of Fat-Tailed Mouse Opossums (Thylamys: Didelphidae) From Northwestern Argentina And Southern Bolivia, With The Description Of A New Species Of Tapeworm, F. Agustin Jimenez Ruiz, Janet K. Braun, Mariel Campbell, Scott Lyell Gardner

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

The parasite fauna of two species of fat-tailed mouse opossums from northwestern Argentina is herein presented. Five species of helminths were found, i.e., Pterygodermatites kozeki, Hoineffia simplispicula, Oligacanthorhynchus sp., and a new species of tapeworm, Mathevotaenia sanmartini n. sp. (Cyclophyllidea: Anoplocephalidae). The new species is characterized by a calyciform scolex, relatively few testes (32), and a long cirrus sac; it occurs in fat-tailed mouse opossums at localities above 4,000 m. Those characters make it different from 6 species known to occur in marsupials from the New World, and from other species occurring in armadillos and bats. Didelphoxyuris thylamisis ...


A New Species Of Lentiella (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) From Proechimys Simonsi (Rodentia: Echimyidae) In Bolivia = Una Especie Nueva De Lentiella (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) De Proechimys Simonsi (Rodentia: Echimyidae) En Bolivia, Terry R. Haverkost, Scott Lyell Gardner Oct 2008

A New Species Of Lentiella (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) From Proechimys Simonsi (Rodentia: Echimyidae) In Bolivia = Una Especie Nueva De Lentiella (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) De Proechimys Simonsi (Rodentia: Echimyidae) En Bolivia, Terry R. Haverkost, Scott Lyell Gardner

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

During a biodiversity survey of mammals and their parasites in the Beni, Bolivia in the summer of 2000, several spiny rats, Proechimys simonsi Thomas, 1900, were collected and examined for parasites. Herein we describe Lentiella lamothei n. sp. from one of these hosts. This species is can be distinguished from L. machadoi Rêgo, 1964 by having a greater total length but smaller maximum width, a greater number of segments, a smaller cirrus sac, a smaller scolex diameter, and in the eggs, a larger pyriform apparatus. In addition, we formally validate the genus Lentiella Rêgo, 1964, that had been placed in ...


A Review Of Species In The Genus Rhopalias (Rudolphi, 1819), Terry R. Haverkost, Scott Lyell Gardner Jun 2008

A Review Of Species In The Genus Rhopalias (Rudolphi, 1819), Terry R. Haverkost, Scott Lyell Gardner

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Currently, there are 6 recognized species in the genus Rhopalias. These parasites are found in the small intestines of numerous species of marsupials throughout North and South America. Small mistakes in various classical taxonomic works have given rise to recent and numerous misidentifications of these species. In this work, we examine a total of 99 specimens across all species from museum collections in an attempt to determine informative taxonomic characters to distinguish these species. Despite confusion in the literature, accurate identification of these species can be achieved by observing the presence or absence of oral and flanking spines anterior to ...


Muscleworms, Parelaphostrongylus Andersoni (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae), Discovered In Columbia White-Tailed Deer From Oregon And Washington: Implications For Biogeography And Host Associations, Ingrid M. Asmundsson, Jack A. Mortenson, Eric P. Hoberg Jan 2008

Muscleworms, Parelaphostrongylus Andersoni (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae), Discovered In Columbia White-Tailed Deer From Oregon And Washington: Implications For Biogeography And Host Associations, Ingrid M. Asmundsson, Jack A. Mortenson, Eric P. Hoberg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Parelaphostrongylus andersoni is considered a characteristic nematode infecting white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Host and geographic distribution for this parasite, however, remain poorly defined in the region of western North America. Fecal samples collected from Columbia white-tailed deer (O. v. leucurus) in a restricted range endemic to Oregon and Washington, USA, were examined for dorsal-spined larvae characteristic of many protostrongylid nematodes. Multilocus DNA sequence data (internal transcribed spacer 2 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) established the identity and a new record for P. andersoni in a subspecies of white-tailed deer previously unrecognized as hosts. Populations of P. andersoni are now ...


Protostrongylid Parasites And Pneumonia In Captive And Wild Thinhorn Sheep (Ovis Dalli), Emily J. Jenkins, A. M. Veitch, Susan J. Kutz, T. K. Bollinger, J. M. Chirino-Trejo, B. T. Elkin, K. H. West, Eric P. Hoberg, L. Polley Jan 2007

Protostrongylid Parasites And Pneumonia In Captive And Wild Thinhorn Sheep (Ovis Dalli), Emily J. Jenkins, A. M. Veitch, Susan J. Kutz, T. K. Bollinger, J. M. Chirino-Trejo, B. T. Elkin, K. H. West, Eric P. Hoberg, L. Polley

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

We describe health significance of protostrongylid parasites (Parelaphostrongylus odocoilei and Protostrongylus stilesi) and other respiratory pathogens in more than 50 naturally infected Dall’s sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) from the Mackenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories (1998–2002) as well as in three Stone’s sheep (O. d. stonei) experimentally infected with P. odocoilei (2000–2002). Histological lesions in the brain and distribution of P. odocoilei in the muscles of experimentally and naturally infected sheep were consistent with a previously hypothesized ‘‘central nervous system to muscle’’ pattern of migration for P. odocoilei. Dimensions of granulomas associated with eggs of P. odocoilei and ...