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Kinesiology

Balance

Iowa State University

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns In Parkinson's Disease Patients., Amanda L. Penko, Joshua R. Hirsch, Claudia Voelcker-Rehage, Philip E. Martin, Gordon Blackburn, Jay L. Alberts Dec 2014

Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns In Parkinson's Disease Patients., Amanda L. Penko, Joshua R. Hirsch, Claudia Voelcker-Rehage, Philip E. Martin, Gordon Blackburn, Jay L. Alberts

Kinesiology Publications

Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease (Deponti et al., 2013) which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this ...


Mediolateral Stability During Gait In People With Parkinson's Disease, Sudeshna Aloke Chatterjee Jan 2010

Mediolateral Stability During Gait In People With Parkinson's Disease, Sudeshna Aloke Chatterjee

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Gait control is a clinical problem in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Gait variability leading to instability is commonly measured using spatio-temporal variables like step length, step time, step width and cadence. Another measurement that provides information about directional instability is harmonic ratios (HRs). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between step width and mediolateral stability using HRs in people with Parkinson's disease (n = 19) and age matched controls (n = 19). The participants walked at their preferred pace and then with a wider step width and narrower step width. The results showed that the ...