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Treatment-Associated Changes In Body Composition, Health Behaviors, And Mood As Predictors Of Change In Body Satisfaction In Obese Women: Effects Of Age And Race/Ethnicity, Jim Annesi, Gisele A. Tennant, Nicole Mareno Nov 2014

Treatment-Associated Changes In Body Composition, Health Behaviors, And Mood As Predictors Of Change In Body Satisfaction In Obese Women: Effects Of Age And Race/Ethnicity, Jim Annesi, Gisele A. Tennant, Nicole Mareno

Jim Annesi

A lack of satisfaction with one’s body is common among women with obesity, often prompting unhealthy “dieting.” Beyond typically slow improvements in weight and body composition, behavioral factors might also affect change in body satisfaction. Age and race/ethnicity (African American vs. White) might moderate such change. Obese women (N = 246; M age = 43 years; M BMI = 39 kg/m2) initiating a 6-month cognitive-behaviorally based physical activity and nutrition treatment were assessed on possible predictors of body satisfaction change. At baseline, African American and younger women had significantly higher body satisfaction. The treatment was associated with significant within-group ...


Bi-Directional Relationship Between Self-Regulation And Improved Eating: Temporal Associations With Exercise, Reduced Fatigue, And Weight Loss, Jim Annesi, Ping H. Johnson, Kandice J. Porter Dec 2013

Bi-Directional Relationship Between Self-Regulation And Improved Eating: Temporal Associations With Exercise, Reduced Fatigue, And Weight Loss, Jim Annesi, Ping H. Johnson, Kandice J. Porter

Jim Annesi

Severely obese men and women (body mass index ≥ 35 ≤ 55 kg/m2; Mage = 44.8 years, SD = 9.3) were randomly assigned to a 6-month physical activity support treatment paired with either nutrition education (n = 83) or cognitive-behavioral nutrition (n = 82) methods for weight loss. Both groups had significant improvements in physical activity, fatigue, self-regulation for eating, and fruit and vegetable intake. Compared to those in the nutrition education group, participants in the behavioral group demonstrated greater overall increases in fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity. These group differences were associated with changes that occurred after Month 3 ...