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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Accelerated Domestication Of Australian Native Grass Species Using Molecular Tools, Sylvia Malory Jan 2014

Accelerated Domestication Of Australian Native Grass Species Using Molecular Tools, Sylvia Malory

Theses

In this study the rice (Oryza sativa) genome sequence was used for comparison with corresponding genes in Microlaena stipoides, a distant relative of rice. M. stipoides whole genome sequence was assembled to the rice genome to generate species specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for putative BADH2, GW2 and Hd6 homologues in M. stipoides. Pooled PCR amplicons were generated and then screened using the Illumina Genome Analyzer II to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These SNPs were then validated by Sequenom iPlex MassARRAY. Potentially useful SNPs can be used in establishing new breeding lines of M. stipoides.


Injury, Physiological Stress And Mortality Of Recreationally Discarded Crustaceans In New South Wales, Australia, Jesse Carl Leland Jan 2014

Injury, Physiological Stress And Mortality Of Recreationally Discarded Crustaceans In New South Wales, Australia, Jesse Carl Leland

Theses

Australian recreational fishers discard large amounts of decapod crustaceans each year, but no formal studies have investigated their fate. To assess this, Scylla serrata, Portunus pelagicus and Sagmariasus verreauxi were trapped in New South Wales using popular recreational trap designs, before subsequent assessment of injury, physiological stress and mortality were made. For all species, physiological changes were generally transitory and capture-related injury was mostly non-lethal. Some S. verreauxi died (3.3%) from within-trap predation and minimal trapping-related P. pelagicus mortality occurred (1.1%). No S. serrata died. The results support the use of mandatory discarding to help control stock ...


Abundance, Population Dynamics, Reproduction, Rates Of Population Increase And Migration Linkages Of Eastern Australian Humpback Whales (Megaptera Novaeangliae) Utilising Hervey Bay, Queensland, Wally Franklin Jan 2014

Abundance, Population Dynamics, Reproduction, Rates Of Population Increase And Migration Linkages Of Eastern Australian Humpback Whales (Megaptera Novaeangliae) Utilising Hervey Bay, Queensland, Wally Franklin

Theses

This study presents the first evidence that the humpback whales utilising Hervey Bay may be a sub-group of the eastern Australian (E1) humpback whale population and that the stopover may contribute to high rates of increase in abundance observed in Hervey Bay compared to other populations. Humpback whales from Hervey Bay are shown to use complex migratory pathways to and from Antarctic feeding areas, are involved in low levels of migratory interchange with nearby populations and, this study provides the first evidence that eastern Australian humpbacks use the southern waters of New Zealand en-route to and from Antarctic feeding areas.


Studies On The Ecology Of The Endangered Camaenid Land Snail Thersites Mitchellae (Cox, 1864), Jonathan Leslie Parkyn Jan 2014

Studies On The Ecology Of The Endangered Camaenid Land Snail Thersites Mitchellae (Cox, 1864), Jonathan Leslie Parkyn

Theses

Many Australian land snail species are assumed to have declined in distribution and abundance, but there are few quantitative data available to assess their conservation status. Thersites mitchellae (Cox, 1864) (Camaenidae) is listed as endangered (category ENC2a) on the IUCN 1997 Red List of Threatened Species. Population parameters such as abundance, probability of survival, and probability of site occupancy were estimated. The methods take detection probability into account and allow for the inclusion of sampling, habitat, and individual animal covariates. These models and techniques offer considerable scope for application to land snail conservation particularly for species at risk of extinction.


Migratory Patterns And Behaviour Of Humpback Whales (Megaptera Novaeangliae) Along The Highly Urbanised Gold Coast Environment, Silje Vindenes Jan 2014

Migratory Patterns And Behaviour Of Humpback Whales (Megaptera Novaeangliae) Along The Highly Urbanised Gold Coast Environment, Silje Vindenes

Theses

A whale watch industry vessel was utilised to support research on the migratory patterns and behaviour of humpback whales in the Gold Coast bay, southern Queensland, Australia. Large numbers of whales use the bay as a temporary aggregation area and 1063 pods were recorded during 2008-2012, with 641 individual whales identified. Study data provided important information on pod composition, behaviour and migratory patterns of these whales. These baseline data can be used to improve management of whales in the urbanised coastal waters in the Gold Coast bay to reduce environmental pressures on these whales as their population continues to grow.