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Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

2009

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Articles 1 - 30 of 418

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Development And Validation Of A Taqman Real-Time Reverse Transcription-Pcr For Rapid Detection Of Feline Calicivirus, M Abd-Eldaim, Rebecca Wilkes, K Thomas, Melissa Kennedy Oct 2012

Development And Validation Of A Taqman Real-Time Reverse Transcription-Pcr For Rapid Detection Of Feline Calicivirus, M Abd-Eldaim, Rebecca Wilkes, K Thomas, Melissa Kennedy

Rebecca P. Wilkes DVM, PhD, DACVM

Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a common cause of upper respiratory tract disease in cats and is associated with interstitial pneumonia, oral ulceration and polyarthritis. Recently, outbreaks have involved a highly virulent FCV that leads to multisystemic signs. Virus isolation and conventional RT-PCR are the most common methods used for FCV diagnosis. However, real-time RT-PCR offers a rapid, sensitive, specific and easy tool for nucleic acid detection. The objective of this study was to design a TaqMan probe-based, real-time RT-PCR assay for detection of FCV. It was determined in our previous study that the first 120 nucleotides of the 5' region ...


Lake Mead National Recreation Area Sensitive Wildlife Species Monitoring And Analysis: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending December 31, 2009, Margaret N. Rees Dec 2009

Lake Mead National Recreation Area Sensitive Wildlife Species Monitoring And Analysis: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending December 31, 2009, Margaret N. Rees

Wildlife Monitoring

Project 1. Relict Leopard Frog Monitoring, Management, and Research

  • All milestones and deliverables are on schedule
  • Fall surveys at all sites have been completed
  • Mark-recapture surveys scheduled for fall were completed
  • Short-term habitat improvements at two sites were conducted
  • RLFCT meeting was hosted
  • Draft annual report was written and presented at the RLFCT meeting

Project 2. Bald Eagle Winter Monitoring and Evaluation

  • All milestones and deliverables are on schedule
  • An annual project review presentation was given to Clark County
  • A draft final report was written and submitted to Clark County
  • All data for this project was transferred to the County ...


The Evolutionary Genetics Of Life History In Drosophila Melanogaster, Annalise B. Paaby Dec 2009

The Evolutionary Genetics Of Life History In Drosophila Melanogaster, Annalise B. Paaby

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Life history traits are critical components of fitness and frequently reflect adaptive responses to environmental pressures. Natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster exhibit patterns of lifespan, fecundity, development time, body size and stress resistance that vary predictably along environmental gradients. Artificial selection studies, genetic correlation analyses, and quantitative trait mapping efforts have demonstrated a genetic basis for the observed phenotypic variation, but few genes have been identified that contribute to natural life history variation. This work employs a candidate gene approach to discover genes and specific polymorphisms that contribute to genetic variance for D. melanogaster life history. Three aging genes, which ...


Using Evolutionary Genomics To Elucidate Parasite Biology And Host-Pathogen Interactions, Lucia Peixoto Dec 2009

Using Evolutionary Genomics To Elucidate Parasite Biology And Host-Pathogen Interactions, Lucia Peixoto

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation exploits phylogenomic approaches to identify genes and gene families likely to be important in the biology of apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium (the causative agent of malaria) and Toxoplasma (a leading source of congenital neurological birth defects, and a prominent opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed individuals). In particular, we have explored the significance of lateral gene transfer and gene duplication as sources of evolutionary novelty . Genomic-scale phylogenetic tree comparison identifies surprisingly extensive lateral gene transfer (LGT), including plant-like genes presumably acquired from the algal source of the apicomplexan plastid (apicoplast), and animal-like genes that may have been acquired from these ...


Modular Organization And Composability Of Rna, Miler T. Lee Dec 2009

Modular Organization And Composability Of Rna, Miler T. Lee

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Life is organized. Organization is largely achieved via composability -- that at some level of abstraction, a system consists of smaller parts that serve as building blocks -- and modularity -- the tendency for these blocks to be independent units that recombine to form functionally different systems. Here, we explore the organization, composition, and modularity of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules, biopolymers that adopt three-dimensional structures according to their specific nucleotide sequence. We address three themes: the efficacy of specific sequences to function as modules or as the context in which modules are inserted; the sources of novel modules in modern genomes; and the ...


Niche Partitioning Among Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi And Consequences For Host Plant Performance, Jennifer H. Doherty Dec 2009

Niche Partitioning Among Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi And Consequences For Host Plant Performance, Jennifer H. Doherty

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

We understand little about the factors that determine and maintain local species diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), the reasons why a single plant has multiple AMF partners, and how that diversity influences host plant performance. The extent to which co-occurring AMF species occupy different niche space, based on their ability to tolerate different soil conditions or differentially promote host plant growth in those differing conditions, offers possible explanations for the maintenance of diversity.

AMF community composition was examined in relation to soil variability in a naturally metalliferous serpentine grassland and along a Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn soil contamination ...


Evolution Of Genome-Wide Gene Regulation In The Budding Yeast Cell-Division Cycle, Daniel F. Simola Dec 2009

Evolution Of Genome-Wide Gene Regulation In The Budding Yeast Cell-Division Cycle, Daniel F. Simola

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Genome-wide regulation of gene expression involves a dynamic epigenetic structure which generates an organism's life-cycle. Although changes in gene expression during development have broad effects on many basic phenomena including cell growth, differentiation, morphogenesis, and disease progression, the evolutionary forces influencing gene expression dynamics and gene regulation remain largely unknown, due to the nature of gene expression as a polygenic, quantitative trait. Moreover, gene expression is regulated differentially over time, so evolutionary forces may be influenced by developmental context. To advance the understanding of evolution in the context of the life-cycle, the architecture of gene expression timing control and ...


Nest And Brood Survival And Habitat Selection Of Ring-Necked Pheasants And Greater Prairie-Chickens In Nebraska, Ty Matthews Dec 2009

Nest And Brood Survival And Habitat Selection Of Ring-Necked Pheasants And Greater Prairie-Chickens In Nebraska, Ty Matthews

Dissertations & Theses in Natural Resources

Ring-Necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and Greater Prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus cupido pinnatus) populations have declined in the Midwest since the 1960’s. Research has suggested decreased nest and brood survival are the major causes of this decline due to the lack of suitable habitat. Habitat degradation has been attributed to the shift to larger crop fields, lower diversity of crops, and more intensive pesticide and herbicide use. A primary goal of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is to mitigate the loss of wildlife habitat. Early research found that CRP increased the amount of suitable nesting and brood rearing cover for both species ...


Identification Of Eurycea Using Cytochrome B, Karis A. Myers Dec 2009

Identification Of Eurycea Using Cytochrome B, Karis A. Myers

Senior Honors Theses

Genomic sequencing is a powerful tool that has many applications for research, one of which is in the field of taxonomy and the identification of species. This thesis discusses the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b and its utility in population genetics and identification of larval amphibians. The development of the Polymerase Chain Reaction and primers are an integral part of the modern DNA sequencing process. The Polymerase Chain Reaction is used to amplify a target DNA sequence, and the protocol for this procedure must be optimized for the specific sequence of target DNA. Primers must also be designed and modified for ...


Dietary Response Of Sympatric Deer To Fire Using Stable Isotope Analysis Of Liver Tissue, W.D. Walter, T. J. Zimmerman, D. M. Leslie Jr., J. A. Jenks Dec 2009

Dietary Response Of Sympatric Deer To Fire Using Stable Isotope Analysis Of Liver Tissue, W.D. Walter, T. J. Zimmerman, D. M. Leslie Jr., J. A. Jenks

Natural Resource Management Faculty Publications

Carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in biological samples from large herbivores identify photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs. C4 ) of plants they consumed and can elucidate potential nutritional characteristics of dietary selection. Because large herbivores consume a diversity of forage types, δ13C and δ15N in their tissue can index ingested and assimilated diets through time. We assessed δ13C and δ15N in metabolically active liver tissue of sympatric mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (O. virginianus) to identify dietary disparity resulting from use of burned and unburned areas in a largely forested landscape. Interspecific variation in dietary disparity of deer was ...


Nesting Ecology Of Greater Sage-Grouse Centrocercus Urophasianus At The Eastern Edge Of Their Historic Distribution, Katie M. Herman-Brunson, Kent C. Jensen, Nicholas W. Kaczor, Christopher C. Swanson, Mark A. Rumble, Robert W. Klaver Dec 2009

Nesting Ecology Of Greater Sage-Grouse Centrocercus Urophasianus At The Eastern Edge Of Their Historic Distribution, Katie M. Herman-Brunson, Kent C. Jensen, Nicholas W. Kaczor, Christopher C. Swanson, Mark A. Rumble, Robert W. Klaver

Natural Resource Management Faculty Publications

Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus populations in North Dakota declined approximately 67% between 1965 and 2003, and the species is listed as a Priority Level 1 Species of Special Concern by the North Dakota Game and Fish Department. The habitat and ecology of the species at the eastern edge of its historical range is largely unknown. We investigated nest site selection by greater sage-grouse and nest survival in North Dakota during 2005 - 2006. Sage-grouse selected nest sites in sagebrush Artemisia spp. with more total vegetative cover, greater sagebrush density, and greater 1-m visual obstruction from the nest than at random sites ...


Changes In Vegetation Structure Through Time In A Restored Tallgrass Prairie Ecosystem And Implications For Avian Diversity And Community Composition, Brian Frederick Olechnowski, Diane M. Debinski, Pauline Drobney, Karen Viste-Sparkman, William T. Reed Dec 2009

Changes In Vegetation Structure Through Time In A Restored Tallgrass Prairie Ecosystem And Implications For Avian Diversity And Community Composition, Brian Frederick Olechnowski, Diane M. Debinski, Pauline Drobney, Karen Viste-Sparkman, William T. Reed

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Grassland birds are one of the most endangered taxa in temperate North America. Because many species declines have been linked to habitat fragmentation and loss, large-scale prairie restoration projects have the potential to provide critical habitat for these declining species. We examined how the structure of restored grassland habitat changes through time and how diversity and community composition of grassland birds respond to these changes. Our study was completed at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, a large-scale prairie restoration in central Iowa. Vegetation composition and structure were measured at 42 restored grassland plots throughout the refuge in 2007. Birds were ...


Biological Simulations And Biologically Inspired Adaptive Systems, Edgar Alfredo Duenez-Guzman Dec 2009

Biological Simulations And Biologically Inspired Adaptive Systems, Edgar Alfredo Duenez-Guzman

Doctoral Dissertations

Many of the most challenging problems in modern science lie at the interface of several fields. To study these problems, there is a pressing need for trans-disciplinary research incorporating computational and mathematical models. This dissertation presents a selection of new computational and mathematical techniques applied to biological simulations and problem solving: (i) The dynamics of alliance formation in primates are studied using a continuous time individual-based model. It is observed that increasing the cognitive abilities of individuals stabilizes alliances in a phase transition-like manner. Moreover, with strong cultural transmission an egalitarian regime is established in a few generations. (ii) A ...


The Effects Of A Reservoir On Genetic Isolation In Two Species Of Darters, Kerstin Lindsay Edberg Dec 2009

The Effects Of A Reservoir On Genetic Isolation In Two Species Of Darters, Kerstin Lindsay Edberg

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

The addition of dams into a riverine system causes a wide range of changes (i.e., sedimentation, erosion, thermal) to the river as well as to the fish assemblages of that river. Although there have been many studies documenting the changes that occur to the fish assemblages in the impounded river, there have been fewer studies examining the effects of a reservoir on the fish inhabiting the tributaries upstream of the impoundment. One possible impact of a reservoir could be to act as a barrier to fish migration between streams.
To determine if reservoirs restrict migration, the genetic diversity of ...


Relating Fires Affect On Forest Succession And Forest's Effect On Fire Severity In One Burned And Unburned Environment, Tyler Jay Seiboldt Dec 2009

Relating Fires Affect On Forest Succession And Forest's Effect On Fire Severity In One Burned And Unburned Environment, Tyler Jay Seiboldt

Environmental Studies Undergraduate Student Theses

Wildfires are a natural part of many forest ecosystems and play a vital role in maintaining their health. Wildfires can have a critical influence on a landscapes plant community through their relative frequency, seasonality, and severity. One of the most heavily influenced regions by wildfire disturbance is the Klamath Mountain region of California. I looked at the affect a wildfires severity had on the Whiskey creek valley within the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. 8 tree species and 4 flower species were examined on both the burned and unburned regions within this valley nearly a year after the wildfire (May 17-23 ...


Exploring Red-Tailed Hawk Migration Using Stable Isotope Analysis And Dna Sexing Techniques, Kara Clare Donohue Dec 2009

Exploring Red-Tailed Hawk Migration Using Stable Isotope Analysis And Dna Sexing Techniques, Kara Clare Donohue

Boise State University Theses and Dissertations

Understanding the movements of migratory birds and connecting the different stages of their annual cycle is necessary for the conservation and management of migratory bird species. Stable isotope technology has the potential to shed light on the movements of migratory species and to help us better understand their population dynamics. Several studies use stable hydrogen isotopes in particular to predict origins of birds sampled during migration or in winter. However, recent work on stable hydrogen isotopes in feathers (δDf) draws into question the utility of this technology in estimating origins of migrants. My objective was to determine whether stable ...


Attempted Cloning Of A Wnt Gene From Botrylloides Violaceus, Manasa Chandra, James Tumulak Dec 2009

Attempted Cloning Of A Wnt Gene From Botrylloides Violaceus, Manasa Chandra, James Tumulak

Biological Sciences

Botrylloides violaceus is a colonial ascidian with the ability to undergo sexual and asexual reproduction as well as regeneration. The canonical pathway starts with the extracellular protein Wnt and ends with β-catenin, a transcription factor, which also functions in cell adhesion. The Wnt signaling pathway is involved in embryogenesis and regeneration in a variety of other species. In our studies we attempt to isolate and sequence both a Wnt gene and from Botrylloides via degenerate primer design and PCR. Using bioinformatic methods we aligned sequences from other organisms, as the Botrylloides genome has not yet been sequenced. Using mouse, Ciona ...


Characterization Of Gulf Sturgeon Diel And Seasonal Activity In The Pensacola Bay System, Florida, Beth Wrege Dec 2009

Characterization Of Gulf Sturgeon Diel And Seasonal Activity In The Pensacola Bay System, Florida, Beth Wrege

All Dissertations

We assess temporal and spatial distribution and diel variability in activity of Gulf of Mexico sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi in the Pensacola Bay system, Florida, using stationary ultrasonic telemetry. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon (n = 54) migrated through the bay system in fall to wintering areas in the Gulf of Mexico and Santa Rosa Sound. In spring, sturgeon migrated back through the bay system to summering habitats in rivers. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon use East Bay and Escambia Bay primarily as migration routes between riverine areas used in spring and summer and the Gulf of Mexico used in winter. North Central ...


Salinity And Stratification In The Gulf Of Maine: 2001-2008, Heather E. Deese-Riordan Dec 2009

Salinity And Stratification In The Gulf Of Maine: 2001-2008, Heather E. Deese-Riordan

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The salinity and vertical density structure (stratification) of the Gulf of Maine strongly influence the physical and biological character of the region including: circulation and transport, vertical mixing, and primary productivity. Variability in salinity and stratification also provides insights into the character and timing of the oceanic waters entering the region, a key to predicting regional climate change. This thesis addresses outstanding questions related to variability in salinity and the relative role of salinity and temperature in creating stratification. Hourly observations from Ocean Observing System buoys throughout the Gulf provide the primary data source for this investigation. Analysis of estimated ...


Ecological Effects Of Genotypic Diversity On Community And Ecosystem Function, Megan K. Kanaga Dec 2009

Ecological Effects Of Genotypic Diversity On Community And Ecosystem Function, Megan K. Kanaga

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Genotypic diversity within populations can have important evolutionary consequences, but the ecological effects of intraspecific genetic variation on community and ecosystem function have only been studied in a few systems. I present the results of a three-year study designed to address the ecological impacts of genotypic diversity in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), using aspen genotypes planted across genotypic diversity levels (monoculture and mixture) and watering treatment levels (well-watered and water-limited). First, I demonstrated that significant variation exists among genotypes for a wide range of growth, morphological and physiological traits, and quantified high heritability and coefficient of genetic variation values ...


Arroyo Toad (Anaxyrus Californicus) Life History, Population Status, Population Threats, And Habitat Assessment Of Conditions At Fort Hunter Liggett, Monterey County, California, Jacquelyn Petrasich Hancock Dec 2009

Arroyo Toad (Anaxyrus Californicus) Life History, Population Status, Population Threats, And Habitat Assessment Of Conditions At Fort Hunter Liggett, Monterey County, California, Jacquelyn Petrasich Hancock

Master's Theses and Project Reports

The arroyo toad (Anaxyrus californicus) is a federally endangered species found on Fort Hunter Liggett, Monterey County, California. The species was discovered in 1996 and was determined to occupy 26.7 km of the San Antonio River from approximately 2.4 km northwest of the San Antonio Mission de Padua, to the river delta above the San Antonio Reservoir. The construction of the San Antonio Reservoir dam in 1963 isolated this northern population of arroyo toads. Through time, the Fort Hunter Liggett landscape has changed drastically. The land was heavily grazed by cattle until 1991, which considerably reduced vegetation in ...


Histomonas Meleagridis And Capillarid Infection In A Captive Chukar (Alectoris Chukar), J Reis Jr., R Beckstead, C Brown, Richard Gerhold Jr. Nov 2009

Histomonas Meleagridis And Capillarid Infection In A Captive Chukar (Alectoris Chukar), J Reis Jr., R Beckstead, C Brown, Richard Gerhold Jr.

Richard W. Gerhold Jr., DVM, MS, PhD

A female, adult, pen-raised chukar (Alectoris chukar) was submitted for postmortem examination. The main gross findings were severe emaciation, coelomic cavity and pericardial edema, and a large, sharply demarcated area of necrosis in the liver. Histologically, the liver lesions were characterized by areas of severe necrosis and inflammation containing numerous protozoal organisms morphologically consistent with Histomonas meleagridis. There was necrotizing typhlitis, with few histomonads and scant Heterakis spp. worms, in the cecum. Numerous aphasmid organisms, consistent with capillarids, were present in the crop and esophageal mucosa. Histomonas meleagridis was identified from frozen samples of liver by polymerase chain reaction and ...


Mixed Species Plantations: Prospects And Challenges, J Doland Nichols, Mila Bristow, Jerome K. Vanclay Nov 2009

Mixed Species Plantations: Prospects And Challenges, J Doland Nichols, Mila Bristow, Jerome K. Vanclay

Professor Jerome K Vanclay

About 2% of English-language literature on plantations deals with mixed-species plantations, but only a tiny proportion (<0.1%) of industrial plantations are polycultures. Small landholders are more innovative, with 12% of Australia’s farm forestry plantations under mixed-species plantings, and 80% of Queensland’s farm forestry as polycultures. We examine reasons for this discrepancy, and explore the history, silviculture and economics of polycultures. Financial analyses suggest that a yield stimulus of 10%, depending on product and rotation length, may be sufficient to offset increased costs associated with planting and managing a mixed-species plantation, a stimulus that has been demonstrated in ...


Where Are The Parasites? [Letters], Susan J. Kutz, Andy P. Dobson, Eric P. Hoberg Nov 2009

Where Are The Parasites? [Letters], Susan J. Kutz, Andy P. Dobson, Eric P. Hoberg

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

First paragraph:

The review by E. Post et al. ("Ecological dynamics across the Arctic associated with recent climate change," 11 September 2009, p. 1,355) paid little heed to parasites and other pathogens. The rapidly growing literature on parasites in arctic and subarctic ecosystems provides empirical and observational evidence that climate-linked changes have already occurred. The life cycle of the protostrongylid lungworm of muskoxen, Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis, has changed, and the range of that organism and the winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus, has expanded.


Plant Water Use Affects Competition For Nitrogen: Why Drought Favors Invasive Species In California, Katherine Evarard, Eric W. Seabloom, W. Stanley Harpole, Claire De Mazancourt Nov 2009

Plant Water Use Affects Competition For Nitrogen: Why Drought Favors Invasive Species In California, Katherine Evarard, Eric W. Seabloom, W. Stanley Harpole, Claire De Mazancourt

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Classic resource competition theory typically treats resource supply rates as independent; however, nutrient supplies can be affected by plants indirectly, with important consequences for model predictions. We demonstrate this general phenomenon by using a model in which competition for nitrogen is mediated by soil moisture, with competitive outcomes including coexistence and multiple stable states as well as competitive exclusion. In the model, soil moisture regulates nitrogen availability through soil moisture dependence of microbial processes, leaching, and plant uptake. By affecting water availability, plants also indirectly affect nitrogen availability and may therefore alter the competitive outcome. Exotic annual species from the ...


The Complexity-Independence Of The Origin Of Life, Radu Popa Nov 2009

The Complexity-Independence Of The Origin Of Life, Radu Popa

Systems Science Friday Noon Seminar Series

It is often stated that the macroevolution of life is driven toward increased Complexity, and indeed, biosystems situated at higher evolutionary level show higher levels of Complexity. Yet, evidence also shows that some dynamic systems evolve toward lower entropy states, and not by increasing Complexity, but by increasing Organization. Organization is a parameter with two almost orthogonal components: Order and Complexity. Hence, it is possible for a dynamic system to experience changes in Organization in ways that do not elicit changes in Complexity. Whether Order or Complexity controls changes in Organization is dictated by the capacity of a system to ...


Seed Dispersal And Reproduction Patterns Among Everglades Plants, Ronald E. Mossman Nov 2009

Seed Dispersal And Reproduction Patterns Among Everglades Plants, Ronald E. Mossman

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

In this study three aspects of sexual reproduction in Everglades plants were examined to more clearly understand seed dispersal and the allocation of resources to sexual reproduction— spatial dispersal process, temporal dispersal of seeds (seedbank), and germination patterns in the dominant species, sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense). Community assembly rules for fruit dispersal were deduced by analysis of functional traits associated with this process. Seedbank ecology was investigated by monitoring emergence of germinants from sawgrass soil samples held under varying water depths to determine the fate of dispersed seeds. Fine-scale study of sawgrass fruits yielded information on contributions to variation in sexually ...


Genetic Structure Of East Antarctic Populations Of The Moss Ceratodon Purpureus, L. J. Clarke, D. J. Ayre, Sharon A. Robinson Nov 2009

Genetic Structure Of East Antarctic Populations Of The Moss Ceratodon Purpureus, L. J. Clarke, D. J. Ayre, Sharon A. Robinson

Sharon Robinson

The capacity of the polar flora to adapt is of increasing concern given current and predicted environmental change in these regions. Previous genetic studies of Antarctic mosses have been of limited value due to a lack of variation in the markers or non-specificity of the methods used. We examined the power of five microsatellite loci developed for the cosmopolitan moss Ceratodon purpureus to detect genetically distinct clones and infer the distribution of clones within and among populations from the Windmill Islands, East Antarctica. Our microsatellite data suggest extraordinarily high levels of variation reported in RAPD studies were artificially elevated by ...


Correlating Molecular Phylogeny With Venom Apparatus Occurrence In Panamic Auger Snails (Terebridae), Mandë Holford, Nicolas Puillandre, Maria Vittoria Modica, Maren Watkins, Rachel Collin, Eldredge Bermingham, Baldomero M. Olivera Nov 2009

Correlating Molecular Phylogeny With Venom Apparatus Occurrence In Panamic Auger Snails (Terebridae), Mandë Holford, Nicolas Puillandre, Maria Vittoria Modica, Maren Watkins, Rachel Collin, Eldredge Bermingham, Baldomero M. Olivera

Publications and Research

Central to the discovery of neuroactive compounds produced by predatory marine snails of the superfamily Conoidea (cone snails, terebrids, and turrids) is identifying those species with a venom apparatus. Previous analyses of western Pacific terebrid specimens has shown that some Terebridae groups have secondarily lost their venom apparatus. In order to efficiently characterize terebrid toxins, it is essential to devise a key for identifying which species have a venom apparatus. The findings presented here integrate molecular phylogeny and the evolution of character traits to infer the presence or absence of the venom apparatus in the Terebridae. Using a combined dataset ...


On The Zoological Geography Of The Malay Archipelago (1859), Alfred Russel Wallace Nov 2009

On The Zoological Geography Of The Malay Archipelago (1859), Alfred Russel Wallace

Alfred Russel Wallace Classic Writings

No abstract provided.