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Public Law and Legal Theory Commons

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1998

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Articles 1 - 30 of 30

Full-Text Articles in Public Law and Legal Theory

Concurrent Tribal And State Jurisdiction Under Public Law 280 , Vanessa J. Jimenez, Soo C. Song Aug 1998

Concurrent Tribal And State Jurisdiction Under Public Law 280 , Vanessa J. Jimenez, Soo C. Song

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


On Misusing “Revolution” And “Reform”: Procedural Due Process And The New Welfare Act, Cynthia R. Farina Jul 1998

On Misusing “Revolution” And “Reform”: Procedural Due Process And The New Welfare Act, Cynthia R. Farina

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

After a long dry spell, the debate over procedural due process flows again. The Supreme Court has announced the first major doctrinal revision in years; Congress has gutted the regulatory program that underlay Goldberg v. Kelly; and Richard Pierce has published an essay in the Columbia Law Review prophesying a radical de-evolution of due process doctrine that will bring constitutional law into line with the profound political and social revolution evidenced by welfare “reform.” My essay takes Professor Pierce's recent work as a springboard for reengaging the debate about the direction of procedural due process. I begin by recapitulating ...


Guerrillas In Our Midst: The Assault On Radicals In American Law, Daria Roithmayr May 1998

Guerrillas In Our Midst: The Assault On Radicals In American Law, Daria Roithmayr

Michigan Law Review

On October 9, 1997, radicals everywhere celebrated the thirtieth anniversary of the death of Che Guevara, the revered Cuban and South American rebel known as much for his guerrilla manifestos as for his scraggly facial hair and the black beret positioned slightly askance. At the same time Latin Americans and revolutionaries were marking the death of their beloved Che, Professors Daniel Farber and Suzanna Sherry were publishing their long-awaited book, Beyond All Reason: The Radical Assault on Truth in American Law. The professors' timing was, unintentionally, quite appropriate. Like many of Che's manifestos, the book sounds an ideological call ...


The Party Expenditure Provision's Near Death Experience: Colorado Republican Federal Campaign Committee V. Federal Election Commission , Robert M. Knop Feb 1998

The Party Expenditure Provision's Near Death Experience: Colorado Republican Federal Campaign Committee V. Federal Election Commission , Robert M. Knop

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Transferred Intent: An Inquiry Into The Nature Of Criminal Culpability, Anthony M. Dillof Jan 1998

Transferred Intent: An Inquiry Into The Nature Of Criminal Culpability, Anthony M. Dillof

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Common Law Duty, Jim Rossi Jan 1998

Common Law Duty, Jim Rossi

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

This article addresses the implications of retail competition in public utility industries, particularly electricity, for utility service obligations. After tracing the history of the common law duty to serve applicable to public utilities, the efficiency of utility service obligations in the context of rate regulation is explored. Retail competition, many suggest, poses a threat to utility service obligations. However, regulators can minimize the inefficiency of traditional utility service obligations without sacrificing the benefits of retail competition if they pay attention to the structural efficiency of competitive retail markets. The article advocates imposition of basic service obligations on the DisCo and ...


The Concept Of Compliance As A Function Of Competing Conceptions Of International Law, Benedict Kingsbury Jan 1998

The Concept Of Compliance As A Function Of Competing Conceptions Of International Law, Benedict Kingsbury

Michigan Journal of International Law

The purpose of this article is to challenge the tendency in the existing literature to view "compliance" simply as "correspondence of behavior with legal rules." This tendency is intelligibly based in a theoretical view that law can properly be defined and understood as a body of rules and expresses a practical concern to get on with the important task of producing empirical studies of compliance. The logical corollary is that a reasonable degree of conformity between these rules and actual behavior is necessary to an efficacious legal system, so that recurrent and widespread non-conformity with rules would usually call into ...


State Successions And Statelessness: The Emerging Right To An Effective Nationality Under International Law, Jeffrey L. Blackman Jan 1998

State Successions And Statelessness: The Emerging Right To An Effective Nationality Under International Law, Jeffrey L. Blackman

Michigan Journal of International Law

This paper surveys some of the recent developments in international law relating to nationality and state succession, and suggests a growing convergence among several legal principles-specifically the principle of effective nationality, the individual right to a nationality and the corresponding duty of states to prevent statelessness, and the norm of nondiscrimination. At some point this convergence of such diverse areas of law as nationality, diplomatic protection, and human rights will impose positive duties on successor states with respect to their inherited populations: namely the duty to secure effective nationality for persons affected by state succession.


Four Entries, Richard Adelstein Jan 1998

Four Entries, Richard Adelstein

Division II Faculty Publications

Four entries: "American Institutional Economics and the Legal System" (I: 61-66); "John Rogers Commons" (I: 324-327); Richard Theodore Ely" (II: 28-29); and "Plea Bargaining: A Comparative Approach"


Enforcement And The Evolution Of Cooperation, George W. Downs Jan 1998

Enforcement And The Evolution Of Cooperation, George W. Downs

Michigan Journal of International Law

The purpose of this article is to broadly characterize the political economy or institutionalist theory of enforcement and to present data that is at least a first step toward evaluating the managerial and transformationalist critiques. The first section will present a short, schematic summary of the role of enforcement as it is currently viewed in the "new institutions" or political economy literature in international relations. While doubtless familiar to many readers, this is an important point of departure. A notable portion of the debate about the role of enforcement continues to stem from differences in terminology and from the fact ...


The Impact Of The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act Of 1995 On Tribal Governments, Eileen M. Luna Jan 1998

The Impact Of The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act Of 1995 On Tribal Governments, Eileen M. Luna

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


Origins And Scope Of The American Moral Obligation Principle , Kevin M. Teeven Jan 1998

Origins And Scope Of The American Moral Obligation Principle , Kevin M. Teeven

Cleveland State Law Review

The existence of the moral obligation principle in American case law has been recognized in the Restatement (Second) of Contracts section 86 (1): "A promise made in recognition of a benefit previously received by the promisor from the promisee is binding to the extent necessary to prevent injustice." Among common law countries, American jurisdictions are unique in recognizing this ameliorating doctrine. An analysis of the development and scope of this doctrine is buried in the centuries of case law surrounding the tension between the past consideration rule and the moral obligation principle. The intent of this study is to glean ...


Foreigners In Their Own Land: Cultural Land And Transnational Corporations---Emergent International Rights And Wrongs, Martin A. Geer Jan 1998

Foreigners In Their Own Land: Cultural Land And Transnational Corporations---Emergent International Rights And Wrongs, Martin A. Geer

Scholarly Works

Unique and vital components of human culture and the environment are struggling for survival in the Amazon River basin. The rain forest of Amazonia is shared by indigenous peoples and an immensely diverse tropical flora and fauna. This unique culture and physical ecology, however, is threatened by transnational oil corporations which are irreparably devastating Amazonia and its native cultures through oil production activities.

The failure of public international law to address the post World War II emergence of transnational corporations (TNCs) as a major international force has been the subject of significant review by scholars and policy makers. TNCs, often ...


The Gift Of Language, Joseph Vining Jan 1998

The Gift Of Language, Joseph Vining

Articles

Style and substance cross-are genetically related as we now might want to say. Each draws on and is implied by the other. One point at which they cross is our sense of the nature of human language, what language is and can be, what it is not and can never be. The language of law is part of human language. Law is a distinctive form of thought, but it lives in human language. "Rule" might be thought synonymous with "law," but for all its talk of rules, the practice of law does not begin with a descriptive statement, or a ...


Compensation And The Interconnectedness Of Property, Thomas W. Merrill Jan 1998

Compensation And The Interconnectedness Of Property, Thomas W. Merrill

Faculty Scholarship

Professor Joseph Sax's scholarship on the Takings Clause combines the craft of a first-class lawyer with the passion of a visionary. The good lawyer that he is, Sax's scholarship reflects a deep understanding of Supreme Court case law, legal history, and the practical dimensions of various kinds of land use disputes. Yet his work on takings is not animated by any desire for mere doctrinal tidiness. It is driven by a distinctive vision – one in which the earth's resources are becoming increasingly interconnected and in which there is an increasing need for the government to resolve conflicts ...


The Fall And Rise Of Criminal Theory, George P. Fletcher Jan 1998

The Fall And Rise Of Criminal Theory, George P. Fletcher

Faculty Scholarship

These are good times – at least for the theory of criminal law. This special issue of Buffalo Criminal Law Review testifies to a remarkable surge of interest among younger scholars in perennial questions: Why should we punish offenders? Do we require a human act as a precondition for liability and what is its structure? What does it mean for someone to be guilty or culpable for committing an offense? How do we avoid contradictions in structuring the criteria of liability? The time has come for renewed intensity in pondering and discussing these basic issues.

The contributions of this symposium follow ...


In Defense Of The Model Penal Code: A Reply To Professor Fletcher, Paul H. Robinson Jan 1998

In Defense Of The Model Penal Code: A Reply To Professor Fletcher, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Evidentiary Theory Of Blackmail: Taking Motives Seriously, Mitchell N. Berman Jan 1998

The Evidentiary Theory Of Blackmail: Taking Motives Seriously, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Objectivist Vs. Subjectivist Views Of Criminality: A Study In The Role Of Social Science In Criminal Law Theory, Paul H. Robinson, John M. Darley Jan 1998

Objectivist Vs. Subjectivist Views Of Criminality: A Study In The Role Of Social Science In Criminal Law Theory, Paul H. Robinson, John M. Darley

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The authors use social science methodology to determine whether a doctrinal shift-from an objectivist view of criminality in the common law to a subjectivist view in modern criminal codes-is consistent with lay intuitions of the principles of justice. Commentators have suggested that lay perceptions of criminality have shifted in a way reflected in the doctrinal change, but the study results suggest a more nuanced conclusion: that the modern lay view agrees with the subjectivist view of modern codes in defining the minimum requirements of criminality, but prefers the common law's objectivist view of grading the punishment deserved. The authors ...


Commentary On Presentations Of Prof. Roberta S. Karmel & Prof. James A. Fanto, Gregory S. Alexander Jan 1998

Commentary On Presentations Of Prof. Roberta S. Karmel & Prof. James A. Fanto, Gregory S. Alexander

Cornell Law Faculty Publications


Three Positivisms, Robin West Jan 1998

Three Positivisms, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In this article, I accept and hope to expand upon the conventional consensus view that The Path of the Law is a brief for an Americanized version of Austinian legal positivism and for the "separation" of law and morality that is at its core. I also want to show, however, that the distinctive accomplishment of this Essay is its literary ambiguity: Both its explicit arguments for the positivist separation of law and morality, and the three enduring metaphors Holmes uses to make the case -- (1) the "bad man" from whose perspective we can clearly view the law; (2) the "prophecies ...


Up From Individualism (The Brennan Center Symposium On Constitutional Law)." , Donald J. Herzog Jan 1998

Up From Individualism (The Brennan Center Symposium On Constitutional Law)." , Donald J. Herzog

Articles

I was sitting, ruefully contemplating the dilemmas of being a commentator, wondering whether I had the effrontery to rise and offer a dreadful confession: the first time I encountered the countermajoritarian difficulty, I didn't bite. I didn't say, "Wow, that's a giant problem." I didn't immediately start casting about for ingenious ways to solve or dissolve it. I just shrugged. Now I don't think that's because my commitments to either democracy or constitutionalism are somehow faulty or suspect. Nor do I think it's that they obviously cohere. It's rather that the framing ...


Logic And Elements. (Premises And Conclusions: Symbolic Logic For Legal Analysis)." , Richard D. Friedman Jan 1998

Logic And Elements. (Premises And Conclusions: Symbolic Logic For Legal Analysis)." , Richard D. Friedman

Articles

We may happily agree with Holmes that logic is not the life of the law' and yet contend that logic should play a significant role in legal discourse. Logic cannot demonstrate the truth of premises, and so by itself it cannot demonstrate the merits of a legal argument. Moreover, even given the premises, it may be that a leap of faith, or intuition, has an irreducible role at least in some good legal arguments.2 But at least a sound legal argument will not be an illogical one. An argument will not be persuasive if it appears to violate basic ...


The Globalizing State: A Future-Oriented Perspective On The Public/Private Distinction, Federalism, And Democracy, Alfred C. Aman Jan 1998

The Globalizing State: A Future-Oriented Perspective On The Public/Private Distinction, Federalism, And Democracy, Alfred C. Aman

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


The Tragedy Of The Anticommons: Property In The Transition From Marx To Markets, Michael A. Heller Jan 1998

The Tragedy Of The Anticommons: Property In The Transition From Marx To Markets, Michael A. Heller

Articles

Why are many storefronts in Moscow empty, while street kiosks in front are full of goods? In this Article, Professor Heller develops a theory of anticommons property to help explain the puzzle of empty storefronts and full kiosks. Anticommons property can be understood as the mirror image of commons property. By definition, in a commons, multiple owners are each endowed with the privilege to use a given resource, and no one has the right to exclude another When too many owners hold such privileges of use, the resource is prone to overuse - a tragedy of the commons. Depleted fisheries and ...


Castles In The Sand: Balancing Public Custom And Private Ownership Interests On Oregon’S Beaches, Steven W. Bender Jan 1998

Castles In The Sand: Balancing Public Custom And Private Ownership Interests On Oregon’S Beaches, Steven W. Bender

Faculty Scholarship

Although much has been written about Oregon's unique legacy of public privilege to use private beaches, scholarship has tended to focus on articulation as well as spirited critique of the custom doctrine. More recently, commentators have addressed the question of whether the public's beach rights can withstand scrutiny under the constitutional takings doctrine. In contrast, this article assumes that the custom doctrine is sufficiently embedded in Oregon's history and case law as precedent to withstand reconsideration of the doctrine and to constitute a background principle of state law for purposes of the takings doctrine. With these assumptions ...


Four Entries, Richard Adelstein Dec 1997

Four Entries, Richard Adelstein

Richard Adelstein

Four entries: "American Institutional Economics and the Legal System" (I: 61-66); "John Rogers Commons" (I: 324-327); Richard Theodore Ely" (II: 28-29); and "Plea Bargaining: A Comparative Approach"


Dalla Simbologia Giuridica A Una Filosofia Giuridica E Politica Simbolica ? Ovvero Il Diritto E I Sensi, Paulo Ferreira Da Cunha Dec 1997

Dalla Simbologia Giuridica A Una Filosofia Giuridica E Politica Simbolica ? Ovvero Il Diritto E I Sensi, Paulo Ferreira Da Cunha

Paulo Ferreira da Cunha

La prima conseguenza della nostra cultura giuridica dell'audizione che è anche cultura dell'oralità, del discorso e della scrittura (di tutto ciò che serve per parlare e fissare quello che può essere detto) è la volontaria atrofia degli altri sensi: il tatto, il gusto, l'olfatto e la vista. Il Diritto quasi non tocca le cose. Le concepisce mentalmente, le dice, però, anche se con i guanti deve toccare il corpo del delitto.


Constitutional Structure As A Limitation On The Scope Of The "Law Of Nations" In The Alien Tort Claims Act, Donald J. Kochan Dec 1997

Constitutional Structure As A Limitation On The Scope Of The "Law Of Nations" In The Alien Tort Claims Act, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

Jurisdiction matters. Outside of the set of jurisdictional constraints, the judiciary is at sea; it poses a threat to the separation of powers and risks becoming a dangerous and domineering branch. Jurisdictional limitations serve a particularly important function when the judiciary is dealing with issues of international law. Since much of international law concerns foreign relations, the province of the executive and, in part, the legislature, the danger that the judiciary will act in a policy-making role or will frustrate the functions of the political branches is especially great. The Framers of the Constitution were particularly concerned with constructing a ...


"Public Use" And The Independent Judiciary: Condemnation In An Interest-Group Perspective, Donald J. Kochan Dec 1997

"Public Use" And The Independent Judiciary: Condemnation In An Interest-Group Perspective, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

This Article reexamines the doctrine of public use under the Takings Clause and its ability to impede takings for private use through an application of public choice theory. It argues that the judicial validation of interest-group capture of the condemnation power through a relaxed public use standard in Takings Clause review can be explained by interest group politics and public choice theory and by institutional tendencies inherent in the independent judiciary. Legislators can sell the eminent domain power to special interests for almost any use, promising durability in the deal given the low probability that the judiciary will invalidate it ...