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Articles 1 - 30 of 45

Full-Text Articles in Public Law and Legal Theory

Jail Isolation After Kingsley: Abolishing Solitary Confinement At The Intersection Of Pretrial Incarceration And Emerging Adulthood, Deema Nagib May 2017

Jail Isolation After Kingsley: Abolishing Solitary Confinement At The Intersection Of Pretrial Incarceration And Emerging Adulthood, Deema Nagib

Fordham Law Review

In 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court held that allegations of excessive use of force in pretrial detention are subject to an objective standard. However, it is unclear whether the objective standard extends to claims arising out of different factual circumstances. The Second Circuit’s recent decision in Darnell v. Pineiro to extend Kingsley v. Hendrickson to conditions-of- confinement cases provides hope. This Note argues that Kingsley should extend to solitary confinement litigation—particularly the isolation of emerging adults in pretrial detention. Solitary confinement is a widespread practice in the criminal justice system, but the implications of its use in ...


Moore’S Potential, June Carbone, Naomi Cahn May 2017

Moore’S Potential, June Carbone, Naomi Cahn

Fordham Law Review

Part I of this Article briefly explores the culture wars that have consumed American politics since Moore. Part II discusses Moore’s uneasy position within the conception of family as a matter of choice versus tradition. Then, to the extent that the Moore Court addressed the changing family, Part III shows how it did so by treating the extended family as a manifestation of traditional family values, not the newly emerging substantive family values that valorize delay in childbearing and financial independence. Finally, Part IV considers Moore's missed opportunities to examine the relationship between family form, race, and class.


John Moore Jr.: Moore V. City Of East Cleveland And Children’S Constitutional Arguments, Nancy E. Dowd May 2017

John Moore Jr.: Moore V. City Of East Cleveland And Children’S Constitutional Arguments, Nancy E. Dowd

Fordham Law Review

This Article is divided into three parts. First, I retell the story of Moore from John Jr.’s perspective and frame his potential claims. Second, I explore constitutional arguments under existing doctrine, using contemporary equal protection and substantive due process analyses. Finally, I suggest how a children’s rights perspective might be even more persuasive as a strategy for John Jr. as well as for achieving opportunity and equality on behalf of contemporary children living amid and affected by structural inequalities that impact their developmental capacity.


Marriage Equality And Family Diversity: Comparative Perspectives From The United States And South Africa, Holning Lau May 2017

Marriage Equality And Family Diversity: Comparative Perspectives From The United States And South Africa, Holning Lau

Fordham Law Review

This Article proceeds in two parts. Part I examines the United States’s and South Africa’s competing approaches to same-sex marriage. Both countries’ highest courts ruled that excluding same-sex couples from marriage is unconstitutional, but they took divergent paths to reach that conclusion. This Article contends that the Constitutional Court of South Africa paved a better road for other countries to follow because it developed a superior conceptualization of the right to marry. Part II looks beyond same-sex marriage to explore new frontiers for reforming laws to address family diversity both in the United States and in South Africa ...


Complex Kinship Networks In Fragile Families, Tonya L. Brito May 2017

Complex Kinship Networks In Fragile Families, Tonya L. Brito

Fordham Law Review

This Article examines the complex kinship networks in families that experience multiple-partner fertility. Part I begins with a broad examination of the dramatic changes to the American family that have occurred over the past half century. Part I then highlights the broad diversity of forms present in today’s families, the evolving nature of American families, and how a two-tiered family system has emerged as patterns have diverged along class-based lines. Next, Part II turns to multiple-partner fertility, assessing what we know and do not know about this social phenomenon, including its prevalence, characteristics, and trends. Part III then addresses ...


Reflections On The Challenge Of Inez Moore: Family Integrity In The Wake Of Mass Incarceration, Ann Cammett May 2017

Reflections On The Challenge Of Inez Moore: Family Integrity In The Wake Of Mass Incarceration, Ann Cammett

Fordham Law Review

The U.S. Supreme Court case Moore v. City of East Cleveland has long been celebrated as affirming constitutional rights related to family integrity. The Moore holding specifically confirmed the Court’s obligation to scrutinize housing ordinances that regulate a traditional family’s household composition. By comparison and extension, one might assume that alternative family formations would trigger similar scrutiny, but the Court has been loath to extend these protections. Apart from the Court’s failure to increase protections beyond traditional extended families, an interesting phenomenon has gone largely unexplored in this jurisprudential framework. In the wake of late twentieth-century ...


Sharing A House But Not A Household: Extended Families And Exclusionary Zoning Forty Years After Moore, Solangel Maldonado May 2017

Sharing A House But Not A Household: Extended Families And Exclusionary Zoning Forty Years After Moore, Solangel Maldonado

Fordham Law Review

This Article proceeds in three parts. Part I briefly recounts the evolution of zoning laws and their effect on racial minorities. Next, Part II demonstrates how single-family zoning laws disproportionately exclude racial minorities from the most desirable blocks. Part II also examines how these laws economically and socially disadvantage minorities and hinder efforts to integrate neighborhoods and schools. Then, Part III uses Moore to explore potential solutions and concludes that, at minimum, zoning laws cannot exclude two-family homes that are occupied by extended family members. It also shows how Moore may support a more inclusionary approach to zoning.


Extending The Normativity Of The Extended Family: Reflections On Moore V. City Of East Cleveland, Angela Onwuachi-Willig May 2017

Extending The Normativity Of The Extended Family: Reflections On Moore V. City Of East Cleveland, Angela Onwuachi-Willig

Fordham Law Review

Part I of this Article briefly recounts the plurality decision in Moore before analyzing Justice Brennan’s concurring opinion and detailing how the concurrence affirms, rather than deconstructs, the notion of African American deviance in families. Next, Part II specifies the ways in which Justice Brennan could have truly uplifted African American families and other families of color by identifying and explicating the strengths of extended or multigenerational family forms among people of color and by showing how such family forms can be a model, or even the model (if one must be chosen), for all families. Then, Part III ...


Political Insider Trading, Michael R. Siebecker May 2017

Political Insider Trading, Michael R. Siebecker

Fordham Law Review

A fiduciary breach due to secret use of Business Organizations assets for personal gain marks the essential concern in both the insider trading realm and in the context of Business Organizations political spending. Therefore, adopting a similar common law fiduciary rule that Business Organizations managers must disclose the amount and target of political expenditures or refrain from engaging in political activity does not seem like much of an intellectual leap. Not only would such a common law disclosure duty fit neatly within existing Business Organizations governance principles, but the compelled transparency would not offend corporations’ First Amendment rights. In the ...


Thinking Outside The Box: Reforming Commercial Discrimination Doctrine To Combat The Negative Consequences Of Ban-The-Box Legislation, Nina Kucharczyk May 2017

Thinking Outside The Box: Reforming Commercial Discrimination Doctrine To Combat The Negative Consequences Of Ban-The-Box Legislation, Nina Kucharczyk

Fordham Law Review

This Note suggests a new approach to address the unintended consequences of ban-the-box legislation. The solution to combat unconscious discrimination during the hiring process is not to eliminate ban- the-box laws entirely; instead, lawmakers must modernize and strengthen Commercial discrimination doctrine to empower racial minorities who suspect discrimination and to ensure employers are critically analyzing their hiring processes.


Other Mothers, Kevin Maillard May 2017

Other Mothers, Kevin Maillard

Fordham Law Review

There is a robust body of scholarship and jurisprudence addressing psychological parents, assisted reproductive technology, surrogacy, and same-sex parents, which reinforces the primacy of heterosexual marriage and procreation. This tradition suggests a vulnerability of parental status involving the other parent. Now that legal parenthood can be approached in a number of ways, it is time to take a critical look at the preeminence of motherhood and gestation in the determination of parental status and fitness.


Ramshackle Federalism: America’S Archaic And Dysfunctional Presidential Election System, Anthony J. Gaughan Dec 2016

Ramshackle Federalism: America’S Archaic And Dysfunctional Presidential Election System, Anthony J. Gaughan

Fordham Law Review

Accordingly, this Article proposes five sensible and achievable reforms to modernize the presidential election system. Each requires Congress and the federal government to play a much more proactive role in the presidential election system. The Constitution may be founded on federalist principles, but excessive decentralization is not serving us well in presidential election administration. In an age of tumultuous and accelerating change, the presidential election system must be modernized to meet the needs of twenty-first century America.


Election Law And The Presidency: An Introduction And Overview, Jerry H. Goldfeder Dec 2016

Election Law And The Presidency: An Introduction And Overview, Jerry H. Goldfeder

Fordham Law Review

Americans now fully appreciate that presidential candidates are vying for a majority of the Electoral College votes, rather than the individual votes of constituents. Modern campaigns are organized around this goal, and commentators are focused on this reality. As a result, there has been an increased cry to reform the electoral process. After all, if every other public official in the land is elected by receiving more votes than their competitors, why should the President of the United States be elected in this apparently undemocratic fashion? The process appears even more unusual in that electors are chosen pursuant to state ...


Rethinking Presidential Eligibility, Eugene D. Mazo Dec 2016

Rethinking Presidential Eligibility, Eugene D. Mazo

Fordham Law Review

Many aspiring American Presidents have had their candidacies challenged for failing to meet the Constitution’s eligibility requirements. Although none of these challenges have ever been successful, they have sapped campaigns of valuable resources and posed a threat to several ambitious men. This Article examines several notable presidential eligibility challenges and explains why they have often been unsuccessful. The literature on presidential eligibility traditionally has focused on the Eligibility Clause, which enumerates the age, residency, and citizenship requirements that a President must satisfy before taking office. By contrast, very little of it examines how a challenge to one’s candidacy ...


Reforming The Contested Convention: Rethinking The Presidential Nomination Process, Michael T. Morley Dec 2016

Reforming The Contested Convention: Rethinking The Presidential Nomination Process, Michael T. Morley

Fordham Law Review

The presidential nomination process could be substantially improved through a few minor tweaks that would reduce unnecessary uncertainty, bolster its democratic underpinnings, and improve the connections among its various components. First, certain fundamental rules governing national conventions should be determined well in advance of the presidential nominating process, before any primaries or caucuses are held or delegates selected, and not be subject to change or suspension at the convention itself. Second, parties should enhance the democratic moorings of their national conventions by requiring presidential candidates to win a greater number of presidential preference votes to be placed into nomination. Third ...


“Natural Born” Disputes In The 2016 Presidential Election, Derek T. Muller Dec 2016

“Natural Born” Disputes In The 2016 Presidential Election, Derek T. Muller

Fordham Law Review

The 2016 presidential election brought forth new disputes concerning the definition of “natural born Citizen.” The most significant challenges surrounded the eligibility of Senator Ted Cruz, born in Canada to a Cuban father and an American mother. Unlike challenges to President Barack Obama’s eligibility, which largely turned on conspiratorial facts, challenges to Cruz’s eligibility turned principally on the law and garnered more serious attention concerning a somewhat cryptic constitutional clause. Understandably, much attention focused on the definition of “natural born citizen” and whether candidates like Cruz qualified. Administrative challenges and litigation in court revealed deficiencies in the procedures ...


Time To End Presidential Caucuses, Sean J. Wright Dec 2016

Time To End Presidential Caucuses, Sean J. Wright

Fordham Law Review

Following the 2016 election cycle, there will be a great opportunity to implement reform. A major change should be to move away from presidential caucuses. They persist with, in the words of John Oliver, “complex, opaque rules.” These complex rules, which include participating in person for over an hour, negatively impacts participation in the electoral process. For example, in 2012, “participation rates in the Republican Party’s caucuses averaged 3 percent.” 3 percent. Compellingly, PolitiFact has observed that “[c]aucuses and delegate math can be incredibly confusing, and the arcane party structures don’t reflect how most people assume presidential ...


Third-Party And Independent Presidential Candidates: The Need For A Runoff Mechanism, Edward B. Foley Dec 2016

Third-Party And Independent Presidential Candidates: The Need For A Runoff Mechanism, Edward B. Foley

Fordham Law Review

Consider what 2016 might have looked like if this better electoral system had been in place. Bloomberg then could have entered the race without risking being a spoiler. In a three-way race—Bloomberg, Clinton, and Trump—Bloomberg might have fizzled out, leaving a two-way race between Clinton and Trump. Since that is essentially how the election ended up anyway, the country would have been no worse off for having had a chance to consider Bloomberg as an alternative. But suppose, however, with Trump’s candidacy spinning out of control in a series of unacceptable comments (as it appeared to do ...


Does The Constitution Provide More Ballot Access Protection For Presidential Elections Than For U.S. House Elections?, Richard Winger Dec 2016

Does The Constitution Provide More Ballot Access Protection For Presidential Elections Than For U.S. House Elections?, Richard Winger

Fordham Law Review

Both the U.S. Constitution and The Federalist Papers suggest that voters ought to have more freedom to vote for the candidate of their choice for the U.S. House of Representatives than they do for the President or the U.S. Senate. Yet, strangely, for the last thirty-three years, the U.S. Supreme Court and lower courts have ruled that the Constitution gives voters more freedom to vote for the candidate of their choice in presidential elections than in congressional elections. Also, state legislatures, which have been writing ballot access laws since 1888, have passed laws that make it ...


The Second Circuit And Social Justice, Matthew Diller, Alexander A. Reinert Oct 2016

The Second Circuit And Social Justice, Matthew Diller, Alexander A. Reinert

Fordham Law Review

This Article highlights just a few areas of law as illustrations of the Second Circuit’s jurisprudence in dealing with claims of marginalized and subordinated individuals and groups. In the area of civil rights, this Article focuses on sexual harassment law and prisoners’ rights. In the area of public benefits, this Article focuses on public assistance and the disability benefit programs of the Social Security Act.


Equality, Centralization, Community, And Governance In Contemporary Education Law, Eloise Pasachoff Apr 2016

Equality, Centralization, Community, And Governance In Contemporary Education Law, Eloise Pasachoff

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Citizens Versus Bondholders, Richard C. Schragger Feb 2016

Citizens Versus Bondholders, Richard C. Schragger

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Engaging Deliberative Democracy At The Grassroots: Prioritizing The Effects Of The Fiscal Crisis In New York At The Local Government Level, Patricia E. Salkin, Charles Gottlieb Feb 2016

Engaging Deliberative Democracy At The Grassroots: Prioritizing The Effects Of The Fiscal Crisis In New York At The Local Government Level, Patricia E. Salkin, Charles Gottlieb

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Will Grassroots Democracy Solve The Government Fiscal Crisis?, Julie M. Chesnik Feb 2016

Will Grassroots Democracy Solve The Government Fiscal Crisis?, Julie M. Chesnik

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Collateral Consequences: How Reliable Data And Resources Can Change The Way Law Is Practiced, Christopher Gowen, Erin Magary Feb 2016

Collateral Consequences: How Reliable Data And Resources Can Change The Way Law Is Practiced, Christopher Gowen, Erin Magary

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Spaces For Sharing: Micro-Units Amid The Shift From Ownership To Access, John Infranca Jan 2016

Spaces For Sharing: Micro-Units Amid The Shift From Ownership To Access, John Infranca

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


You Can't Common What You Can't See: Towards A Restorative Polycentrism In The Governance Of Our Cities, Amy Laura Cahn, Paula Z. Segal Jan 2016

You Can't Common What You Can't See: Towards A Restorative Polycentrism In The Governance Of Our Cities, Amy Laura Cahn, Paula Z. Segal

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Urban Commons As Property Experiment: Mapping Chicago's Farms And Gardens, Nate Ela Jan 2016

Urban Commons As Property Experiment: Mapping Chicago's Farms And Gardens, Nate Ela

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Disruption And Deference, Olivier Sylvain Jan 2015

Disruption And Deference, Olivier Sylvain

Faculty Scholarship

Online video streaming applications enable users to watch over the-air broadcast programs at any time and almost on any device. As such, they challenge the pertinence of traditional video distribution law and the broadcast network system on which it is based. Congress enacted the Transmit Clause of the 1976 Copyright Act to resolve the high-stakes tussle between broadcasters and cable providers. But, today, that provision is ill-suited to resolving whether unauthorized streaming infringes on broadcasters’ copyright to perform works publicly. Its scope is ambiguous enough that judges across the country were notably divided on whether it reaches online video distribution ...


Wireless Localism: Beyond The Shroud Of Objectivity In Federal Spectrum Administration, Olivier Sylvain Jan 2013

Wireless Localism: Beyond The Shroud Of Objectivity In Federal Spectrum Administration, Olivier Sylvain

Faculty Scholarship

Recent innovations in mobile wireless technology have instigated a debate between two camps of legal scholars about how policymakers should structure federal administration of the electromagnetic spectrum. The first argues that the Federal Communications Commission should define spectrum use rights more clearly and give spectrum licensees near fee-simple property rights in frequencies that they can use and sell in secondary markets as they wish. The second camp argues that, rather than award exclusive licenses to the highest bidder, the FCC ought to open much if not most of the spectrum to unlicensed use by smartphones and tablets equipped with the ...