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Law and Gender Commons

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University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

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Articles 91 - 96 of 96

Full-Text Articles in Law and Gender

Law's Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson Jan 1991

Law's Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson

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No abstract provided.


Response, [To Kathryn Abrams, Hiring Woman], Thomas B. Mcaffee Jan 1990

Response, [To Kathryn Abrams, Hiring Woman], Thomas B. Mcaffee

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This article is a response to an article by Professor Kathryn Abram about the recruitment and hiring of women law professors. Professor McAffee confronts an issue that Professor Abrams does not—that of giving women a “preference” in hiring. Professor McAffee also adds to Professor Abrams’ reflections about the question of how law schools should go about hiring more women.


Whose Nature? Practical Reason And Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson Jan 1990

Whose Nature? Practical Reason And Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson

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No abstract provided.


What Makes Rape A Crime?, Lynne Henderson Jan 1987

What Makes Rape A Crime?, Lynne Henderson

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No abstract provided.


Norris V. Arizona Governing Committee: Titile Vii's Applicability To Arizona's Deferred Compensation Plan, Mary E. Berkheiser Jan 1982

Norris V. Arizona Governing Committee: Titile Vii's Applicability To Arizona's Deferred Compensation Plan, Mary E. Berkheiser

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Analysis of Norris v. Arizona Governing Comm., 671 F.2d 330 (9th Cir. 1982).


Electoral Folklore: An Empirical Examination Of The Abortion Issue, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 1982

Electoral Folklore: An Empirical Examination Of The Abortion Issue, Jeffrey W. Stempel

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Though partisans on both sides claim credit for electoral victories and defeats, and politicians treat both groups with deference, few studies have attempted to gauge the impact of the abortion issue in more than an anecdotal manner. In 1976, NARAL noted that of the 13 members of the U.S. Representatives that lost re-election bids, nine were pro-life, and four were pro-choice. A study conducted by the Alan Guttmacher Institute of the 1974 House races found that, in “competitive” districts, 92 percent of the pro-choice candidates studied were re-elected while only 61 percent of the pro-life candidates were returned to ...