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Law and Gender Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

2019

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law and Gender

What’S Sex Got To Do With It: Questioning Research On Gender & Negotiation, Andrea Kupfer Schneider Jun 2019

What’S Sex Got To Do With It: Questioning Research On Gender & Negotiation, Andrea Kupfer Schneider

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Tort Law’S Devaluation Of Stillbirth, Jill Wieber Lens Jun 2019

Tort Law’S Devaluation Of Stillbirth, Jill Wieber Lens

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Venture Bearding, Benjamin P. Edwards, Ann C. Mcginley Jan 2019

Venture Bearding, Benjamin P. Edwards, Ann C. Mcginley

Scholarly Works

“Venture bearding,” a term that we coin in this Article, describes processes of obscuring and covering socially stigmatized identities in business environments. This Article introduces distinctive identity performance strategies from the technology, startup, and venture capital context into the legal literature and discusses what their existence explains about business environments and capital formation. Venture bearding, as we use the term, describes behaviors that persons with contextually stigmatized identities adopt to access social status and capital. In some instances, women, who are stigmatized in this context, may employ men as front persons to conceal that the venture is an exclusively women-owned ...


Learning From Feminist Judgments: Lessons In Language And Advocacy, Linda L. Berger, Kathryn M. Stanchi, Bridget J. Crawford Jan 2019

Learning From Feminist Judgments: Lessons In Language And Advocacy, Linda L. Berger, Kathryn M. Stanchi, Bridget J. Crawford

Scholarly Works

Judicial decision-making is not a neutral and logical enterprise that involves applying clear rules to agreed-upon facts. Legal educators can and should help students learn more about how judges actually go about making their decisions. The study of re-imagined judicial decisions, such as the alternative judgments from various Feminist Judgments Projects, can enrich the study of law in multiple ways. First, seeing a written decision that differs from the original can help students think “outside the box” constructed by the original opinion by showing them a concrete example of another perspective written in judicial language. Second, the rewritten judgments show ...