Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Health Law and Policy Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Wollschlaeger, A Patient’S Right To Privacy, And A Renewed Focus On Mental Health Treatment, Chad A. Pasternack Jul 2015

Wollschlaeger, A Patient’S Right To Privacy, And A Renewed Focus On Mental Health Treatment, Chad A. Pasternack

University of Miami Business Law Review

In response to doctors pushing gun control agendas on patients, Florida enacted the Firearm Owners Privacy Act. The law, upheld by the Eleventh Circuit in Wollschlaeger v. Governor of Florida, protects patients from intrusive lines of inquiry unrelated to their treatment and from discrimination due to firearm ownership. While patients in Florida benefit greatly from the Firearm Owners Privacy Act, this note argues for more specific language in the law, which would parallel language in the Florida Mental Health Act (“Baker Act”). The proposed changes would limit inquiries into firearm ownership to instances where there is a substantial likelihood of ...


Don't Call Me Crazy: A Survey Of America's Mental Health System, Justin L. Joffe Jul 2015

Don't Call Me Crazy: A Survey Of America's Mental Health System, Justin L. Joffe

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Unfortunately, the typical exposure to mental illness for most Americans comes via tragic mass shootings or highly publicized celebrity mental breakdowns. However, the vast majority of mentally ill individuals are not violent murderers or hyper-tweeting celebrities. Rather, they are the ordinary, everyday people that make up the tens of millions of American adults suffering from some form of mental illness. The American mental health system has a lamentable history. The initial policy of locking up mentally ill individuals in jails transitioned to a system of confinement in asylums that quickly became notorious for their poor living conditions and treatment. The ...


Neuroscience And Health Law: An Integrative Approach, Stacey A. Tovino J.D., Ph.D. Jun 2015

Neuroscience And Health Law: An Integrative Approach, Stacey A. Tovino J.D., Ph.D.

Akron Law Review

Neuroscience is one of the fastest growing scientific fields in terms of the numbers of scientists and the knowledge being gained. In recent years, both the scope of neuroscience and the methodologies employed by neuroscientists have broadly expanded, from biochemical and genetic analysis of individual nerve cells and their molecular constituents, to the imaging of brain structure and function. Perhaps the most significant recent neuroscientific achievement is the ability of neuroimaging technologies, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to image brain function. Clinicians and scientists use fMRI not only to map sensory, motor, and cognitive function, but also to study ...


A Failure To Rehabilitate: Leaving Disability Insurance Out Of The Mental Health Parity Debate, Christopher R. Wilson Mar 2015

A Failure To Rehabilitate: Leaving Disability Insurance Out Of The Mental Health Parity Debate, Christopher R. Wilson

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Diagnosis Dangerous: Why State Licensing Boards Should Step In To Prevent Mental Health Practitioners From Speculating Beyond The Scope Of Professional Standards, Jennifer S. Bard Jan 2015

Diagnosis Dangerous: Why State Licensing Boards Should Step In To Prevent Mental Health Practitioners From Speculating Beyond The Scope Of Professional Standards, Jennifer S. Bard

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article reviews the use of mental health experts to provide testimony on the future dangerousness of individuals who have already been convicted of a crime that qualifies them for the death penalty. Although this practice is common in many states that still retain the death penalty, it most frequently occurs in Texas because of a statute that makes it mandatory for juries to determine the future dangerousness of the defendant they have just found guilty. Both the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association have protested the use of mental health professionals in this setting because there are ...


Taking Pedophilia Seriously, Margo Kaplan Jan 2015

Taking Pedophilia Seriously, Margo Kaplan

Washington and Lee Law Review

This Article pushes lawmakers, courts, and scholars to reexamine the concept of pedophilia in favor of a more thoughtful and coherent approach. Legal scholarship lacks a thorough and reasoned analysis of pedophilia. Its failure to carefully consider how the law should conceptualize sexual attraction to children undermines efforts to address the myriad of criminal, public health, and other legal concerns pedophilia raises. The result is an inconsistent mix of laws and policies based on dubious presumptions. These laws also increase risk of sexual abuse by isolating people living with pedophilia from treatment.

The Article makes two central arguments: (1) although ...


The Dsm-5 And Criminal Defense: When Does A Diagnosis Make A Difference?, Nancy Haydt Jan 2015

The Dsm-5 And Criminal Defense: When Does A Diagnosis Make A Difference?, Nancy Haydt

Utah Law Review

In June 2013, the American Psychiatric Association published the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (“DSM-5”). The DSM-5 was intended to be an updated guidebook for the clinical diagnosis of mental disorders. It received mixed reviews from the mental health community. The reception from the forensic mental health community is likewise varied. The evolution of conceptualizing mental illness, its origins and treatment efficacy, may weaken the authority of the DSM and further confuse its application in forensic situations. This Article explores the possible effects of the DSM-5 in criminal cases.


Rethinking The Childhood-Adult Divide: Meeting The Mental Health Needs Of Emerging Adults, Barbara L. Atwell Jan 2015

Rethinking The Childhood-Adult Divide: Meeting The Mental Health Needs Of Emerging Adults, Barbara L. Atwell

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Part I of this article describes ADHD and explores the extent of ADHD medication abuse, especially among young adults. Part II discusses the characteristics of emerging adults, who may be more likely than their older counterparts to make unwise decisions about medications and other life choices.34 While we protect minors by requiring parental consent for their medical treatments, emerging adults are effectively able to obtain any drug on the market if they convince the doctor that they have the requisite diagnosis. Part III explores HIPAA, the medical malpractice standard of care and the challenges associated with a society that ...