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Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Recognizing The Need For Mental Health Reform In The Texas Department Of Criminal Justice, Kara Mchorse Apr 2020

Recognizing The Need For Mental Health Reform In The Texas Department Of Criminal Justice, Kara Mchorse

St. Mary's Law Journal

The ways in which mental health care and the criminal justice system interact are in desperate need of reform in Texas. The rate of mental illness in Texas is higher than the current state of mental health care can provide for. While state hospitals were once the primary care facilities of those with mental illness, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) has taken on that role in the last few decades; and when the criminal justice system becomes entangled with mental health care, it often leads to “unmitigated disaster.” If Texas continues to allow the TDCJ to act as ...


The Therapist Can't See You Now: How Paid Sick Leave Policy Can Accommodate Mental Illness In The Workplace, Maddy Goss Aug 2019

The Therapist Can't See You Now: How Paid Sick Leave Policy Can Accommodate Mental Illness In The Workplace, Maddy Goss

Arkansas Law Review

Restaurants have become the “poster child” for why employers should adopt paid sick leave. Advocates suggest that employees without access to paid sick leave often show up to work ill due to their inability to sacrifice pay. Clever protest signs read, “No Boogers in my Burger” and “No Coughing in my Coffee.” Any rational customer would not appreciate the thought of a flu-ridden chef assembling their main course. However, the benefits of paid leave legislation and policies go beyond protecting cheeseburgers from flu germs. Just as employees with the flu require time off for medical attention, employees with mental illness ...


Due Process Supreme Court Appellate Division Jul 2019

Due Process Supreme Court Appellate Division

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Mental Health Care In America: Addressing The Mental Health Crisis In Public Schools, Connor Breza Jun 2019

Mental Health Care In America: Addressing The Mental Health Crisis In Public Schools, Connor Breza

Health Law Outlook

No abstract provided.


Physicians' Attitudes, Concerns, And Procedural Understanding Of Medical Aid-In-Dying In Vermont, Teresa Ditommaso, Ari P. Kirshenbaum, Brendan Parent Apr 2018

Physicians' Attitudes, Concerns, And Procedural Understanding Of Medical Aid-In-Dying In Vermont, Teresa Ditommaso, Ari P. Kirshenbaum, Brendan Parent

Dalhousie Law Journal

The general purpose of the current study was to collect data on physicians' attitudes towards Act 39, the medical aid-in-dying act that was legislatively approved in 2013. Given the recent nature of the implementation of Act 39, this is the first such study to be conducted in the State of Vermont. The survey was quantitative in nature and addressed three distinct aspects of legalized prescribing of life-ending medication, these being physicians': (I) attitudes regarding ethics and legality of Act 39, (11)understandings of the policies and procedural requirements under the law, including their belief in legal immunity from penalty, and ...


"Your Old Road Is/ Rapidly Agin'": International Human Rights Standards And Their Impact On Forensic Psychologists, The Practice Of Forensic Psychology, And The Conditions Of Institutionalization Of Persons With Mental Disabilities, Michael L. Perlin Jan 2018

"Your Old Road Is/ Rapidly Agin'": International Human Rights Standards And Their Impact On Forensic Psychologists, The Practice Of Forensic Psychology, And The Conditions Of Institutionalization Of Persons With Mental Disabilities, Michael L. Perlin

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

For years, considerations of the relationship between international human rights standards and the work of forensic psychologists have focused on the role of organized psychology in prisoner abuse at Guantanamo Bay and Abu Ghirab. That issue has been widely discussed and debated, and these discussions show no sign of abating. But there has been virtually no attention given to another issue of international human rights, one that grows in importance each year: how the treatment (especially, the institutional treatment) of persons with mental and intellectual disabilities violates international human rights law, and the silence of organized forensic psychology in the ...


The Faa’S Mental Health Standards: Are They Reasonable?, Katie Manworren Jan 2018

The Faa’S Mental Health Standards: Are They Reasonable?, Katie Manworren

Journal of Air Law and Commerce

No abstract provided.


Modernizing The Canada Health Act, Colleen M. Flood, Bryan Thomas Oct 2016

Modernizing The Canada Health Act, Colleen M. Flood, Bryan Thomas

Dalhousie Law Journal

The Canada Health Act (CHA) was adopted in 1984, to shore up a health-care system conceptualized in the 1960s. Under the CHA, universal coverage is limited to "medicallynecessary" hospital and physician services, to the exclusion of vital goods and services such as outpatient pharmaceuticals, dental care, long-term care, and many mental health services. Inequities resulting from these gaps in public coverage are partly to blame for pushing Canada's health system to the bottom ofrecent international rankings. But there is more to modernizing Canada s health care system, we argue, than filling these gaps in universal coverage. Every major health ...


Lay Witness Opinion Testimony On Mental State And Depression: A Call For Reform, Adam Santeusanio Apr 2016

Lay Witness Opinion Testimony On Mental State And Depression: A Call For Reform, Adam Santeusanio

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Wollschlaeger, A Patient’S Right To Privacy, And A Renewed Focus On Mental Health Treatment, Chad A. Pasternack Jul 2015

Wollschlaeger, A Patient’S Right To Privacy, And A Renewed Focus On Mental Health Treatment, Chad A. Pasternack

University of Miami Business Law Review

In response to doctors pushing gun control agendas on patients, Florida enacted the Firearm Owners Privacy Act. The law, upheld by the Eleventh Circuit in Wollschlaeger v. Governor of Florida, protects patients from intrusive lines of inquiry unrelated to their treatment and from discrimination due to firearm ownership. While patients in Florida benefit greatly from the Firearm Owners Privacy Act, this note argues for more specific language in the law, which would parallel language in the Florida Mental Health Act (“Baker Act”). The proposed changes would limit inquiries into firearm ownership to instances where there is a substantial likelihood of ...


Don't Call Me Crazy: A Survey Of America's Mental Health System, Justin L. Joffe Jul 2015

Don't Call Me Crazy: A Survey Of America's Mental Health System, Justin L. Joffe

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Unfortunately, the typical exposure to mental illness for most Americans comes via tragic mass shootings or highly publicized celebrity mental breakdowns. However, the vast majority of mentally ill individuals are not violent murderers or hyper-tweeting celebrities. Rather, they are the ordinary, everyday people that make up the tens of millions of American adults suffering from some form of mental illness. The American mental health system has a lamentable history. The initial policy of locking up mentally ill individuals in jails transitioned to a system of confinement in asylums that quickly became notorious for their poor living conditions and treatment. The ...


Neuroscience And Health Law: An Integrative Approach, Stacey A. Tovino J.D., Ph.D. Jun 2015

Neuroscience And Health Law: An Integrative Approach, Stacey A. Tovino J.D., Ph.D.

Akron Law Review

Neuroscience is one of the fastest growing scientific fields in terms of the numbers of scientists and the knowledge being gained. In recent years, both the scope of neuroscience and the methodologies employed by neuroscientists have broadly expanded, from biochemical and genetic analysis of individual nerve cells and their molecular constituents, to the imaging of brain structure and function. Perhaps the most significant recent neuroscientific achievement is the ability of neuroimaging technologies, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to image brain function. Clinicians and scientists use fMRI not only to map sensory, motor, and cognitive function, but also to study ...


A Failure To Rehabilitate: Leaving Disability Insurance Out Of The Mental Health Parity Debate, Christopher R. Wilson Mar 2015

A Failure To Rehabilitate: Leaving Disability Insurance Out Of The Mental Health Parity Debate, Christopher R. Wilson

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Taking Pedophilia Seriously, Margo Kaplan Jan 2015

Taking Pedophilia Seriously, Margo Kaplan

Washington and Lee Law Review

This Article pushes lawmakers, courts, and scholars to reexamine the concept of pedophilia in favor of a more thoughtful and coherent approach. Legal scholarship lacks a thorough and reasoned analysis of pedophilia. Its failure to carefully consider how the law should conceptualize sexual attraction to children undermines efforts to address the myriad of criminal, public health, and other legal concerns pedophilia raises. The result is an inconsistent mix of laws and policies based on dubious presumptions. These laws also increase risk of sexual abuse by isolating people living with pedophilia from treatment.

The Article makes two central arguments: (1) although ...


The Dsm-5 And Criminal Defense: When Does A Diagnosis Make A Difference?, Nancy Haydt Jan 2015

The Dsm-5 And Criminal Defense: When Does A Diagnosis Make A Difference?, Nancy Haydt

Utah Law Review

In June 2013, the American Psychiatric Association published the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (“DSM-5”). The DSM-5 was intended to be an updated guidebook for the clinical diagnosis of mental disorders. It received mixed reviews from the mental health community. The reception from the forensic mental health community is likewise varied. The evolution of conceptualizing mental illness, its origins and treatment efficacy, may weaken the authority of the DSM and further confuse its application in forensic situations. This Article explores the possible effects of the DSM-5 in criminal cases.


Adjudicating Sex Crimes As Mental Disease, Melissa Hamilton Jul 2013

Adjudicating Sex Crimes As Mental Disease, Melissa Hamilton

Pace Law Review

The psychiatric diseases of the paraphilias are now entrenched in the law in decisions concerning culpability, desert, and risk. Though, as the foregoing cases suggest, it is a tough balancing act, considering the existence of psychiatric illness suggests less responsibility, while at the same time implying a greater risk of future dangerousness. To better navigate this conundrum, the law has drawn on the psychiatric sciences. Part II of this Article outlines a basic need for law and science to serve each other even though they may not share objectives. With respect to the advent of new laws to control sex ...


Advocacy In Health Proceedings In New York State, Kia C. Franklin Apr 2013

Advocacy In Health Proceedings In New York State, Kia C. Franklin

Touro Law Review

Individuals and communities navigating the healthcare system without an advocate often experience devastating outcomes and become burdened with unnecessary costs. These negative outcomes undermine the very utility of our healthcare system. The creation of a legal right to counsel for individuals with critical health related claims would meet an important and unmet need in our health and legal systems by empowering patients, improving the quality of health for many, and preventing unnecessary costs to the health care system.

A dedicated group of healthcare advocates, lawyers, public policy analysts, and other concerned individuals gathered together at Touro Law Center to strategize ...


When Coercion Lacks Care: Competency To Make Medical Treatment Decisions And Parens Patriae Civil Commitments, Dora W. Klein Apr 2012

When Coercion Lacks Care: Competency To Make Medical Treatment Decisions And Parens Patriae Civil Commitments, Dora W. Klein

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The subject of this Article is people who have been civilly committed under a state's parens patriae authority to care for those who are unable to care for themselves. These are people who, because of a mental illness, are a danger to themselves. Even after they have been determined to be so disabled by their mental illness that they cannot care for themselves, many are nonetheless found to be competent to refuse medical treatment. Competency to make medical treatment decisions generally requires only a capacity to understand a proposed treatment, not an actual or rational understanding of that treatment ...


Legal And Policy Standards For Addressing Workplace Racism: Employer Liability And Shared Responsibility For Race-Based Traumatic Stress, Robert T. Carter, Thomas D. Scheuermann Jan 2012

Legal And Policy Standards For Addressing Workplace Racism: Employer Liability And Shared Responsibility For Race-Based Traumatic Stress, Robert T. Carter, Thomas D. Scheuermann

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


From Trusted Confidant To Witness For The Prosecution: The Case Against The Recognition Of A Dangerous-Patient Exception To The Psychotherapist-Patient Privilege, Deborah Paruch May 2011

From Trusted Confidant To Witness For The Prosecution: The Case Against The Recognition Of A Dangerous-Patient Exception To The Psychotherapist-Patient Privilege, Deborah Paruch

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “In 1996, in Jaffee v. Redmond, the U.S. Supreme Court, pursuant to the authority set forth in Federal Rule of Evidence 501, recognized a psychotherapist-patient privilege in the federal courts. In doing so, the Court acknowledged the essential role that confidentiality plays in a therapist-patient relationship and also recognized the important role that psychotherapy plays in the mental health of the American citizenry. However, in dicta set out in a footnote near the conclusion of the opinion (footnote 19 of the opinion), the Court suggested that the privilege might not be absolute, that it might need to “give ...


Is A Mentally Ill Defendant Still Considered Competent To Waive The Right To Counsel In New York After Indiana V. Edwards?, John H. Wilson Nov 2010

Is A Mentally Ill Defendant Still Considered Competent To Waive The Right To Counsel In New York After Indiana V. Edwards?, John H. Wilson

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


Smoke-Free State Psychiatric Facility Grounds: Is Legislation Necessary And Appropriate To Remove Tobacco From These Treatment Settings?, Maureen Hackett M.D. Jan 2008

Smoke-Free State Psychiatric Facility Grounds: Is Legislation Necessary And Appropriate To Remove Tobacco From These Treatment Settings?, Maureen Hackett M.D.

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Choice To Limit Choice: Using Psychiatric Advance Directives To Manage The Effects Of Mental Illness And Support Self-Responsibility, Breanne M. Sheetz Dec 2007

The Choice To Limit Choice: Using Psychiatric Advance Directives To Manage The Effects Of Mental Illness And Support Self-Responsibility, Breanne M. Sheetz

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Psychiatric advance directives are a valuable tool for individuals with mental illnesses. Ulysses directives, in particular, allow individuals to bind themselves to treatment in advance of needing it for the purpose of overcoming illness-induced refusals. This Note evaluates the effectiveness of state advance directive statutes in three areas that are especially important for Ulysses directives: defining competency to execute, activate, and revoke directives; waiving the constitutional right to refuse treatment; and encouraging provider compliance. This Note ultimately advocates for other states to adopt provisions similar to a Washington State statute. The Washington statute authorizes Ulysses directives by allowing advance consent ...


Something Must Be Done: An Argument For The Partial Deregulation Of Research On Bipolar Disorder And The Implementation Of Rolling Informed Consent, Janalee S. Kraschnewski May 2006

Something Must Be Done: An Argument For The Partial Deregulation Of Research On Bipolar Disorder And The Implementation Of Rolling Informed Consent, Janalee S. Kraschnewski

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Bipolar disorder (BD) cripples the lives of countless individuals across the globe. The healthcare community has had difficulty securing effective, long-term treatment for this disease. This Note argues that enlarging the pool of possible research subjects through partial deregulation of BD research would facilitate the development of better treatment. This Note further proposes the implementation of a system of rolling informed consent to ensure that actual and full consent is obtained from BD research subjects.


The Impact Of 9/11 And Its Aftermath On Substance Use And Psychological Functioning: An Overview, Patrick B. Johnson, Linda Richter Jan 2003

The Impact Of 9/11 And Its Aftermath On Substance Use And Psychological Functioning: An Overview, Patrick B. Johnson, Linda Richter

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Essay provides a brief summary and evaluation of findings on the mental health and substance abuse consequences of the events of 9/11 throughout the nation and in United States' cities. It also presents new data obtained from clients who entered substance abuse treatment in New York and other cities either before 9/11 or during a six-month period following the events. This Essay discusses how best to interpret these varying research findings. It concludes that crisis produces many responses and most people just coped with 9/11 in their individual ways.


Legislative And Judicial Solutions For Mental Health Parity: S. 543, Reasonable Accommodation, And An Individualized Remedy Under Title I Of The Ada, Keith Nelson Oct 2001

Legislative And Judicial Solutions For Mental Health Parity: S. 543, Reasonable Accommodation, And An Individualized Remedy Under Title I Of The Ada, Keith Nelson

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Calling Dr. Love: The Physician-Patient Sexual Relationship As Grounds For Medical Malpractice - Society Pays While The Doctor And Patient Play, Scott M. Puglise Jan 2000

Calling Dr. Love: The Physician-Patient Sexual Relationship As Grounds For Medical Malpractice - Society Pays While The Doctor And Patient Play, Scott M. Puglise

Journal of Law and Health

This note examines "consensual" sexual relationships between non-mental health physicians and patients. More specifically, it examines whether such relationships ever amount to medical malpractice. Generally, a non-mental health physician would be liable under the rubric of medical malpractice only if the sexual relationship was commenced under the guise of "medical treatment." Recent cases, however, have expanded liability in certain circumstances when the physician-patient relationship has involved "counseling matters." "Counseling matters" describes talking to patients about their feelings, or discussing personal problems not necessarily related to their proposed treatment. Medical treatment supplemented by "counseling" purportedly requires greater scrutiny due to the ...


Advocacy Of The Establishment Of Mental Health Specialty Courts In The Provision Of Therapeutic Justice For Mentally Ill Offenders, Leroy L. Kondo Jan 2000

Advocacy Of The Establishment Of Mental Health Specialty Courts In The Provision Of Therapeutic Justice For Mentally Ill Offenders, Leroy L. Kondo

Seattle University Law Review

This Article explores the establishment of mental health courts as a partial solution to the perplexing societal problem that relegates mentally ill offenders to a "revolving door" existence in and out of prisons and jails.This inescapable situation results from a paucity ofeffective humanitarian policies, laws, and procedures for treating such medically disordered defendants. The establishment of mental health specialty courts is investigated as a potential means of addressing the complex legal issues and psycho-sociological problems faced by the judicial system in dealing with mentally ill offenders.


Ex Parte Civil Commitment, Family Care-Givers, And Schizophrenia: A Therapeutic Jurisprudence Analysis, Éva Szeli Jan 2000

Ex Parte Civil Commitment, Family Care-Givers, And Schizophrenia: A Therapeutic Jurisprudence Analysis, Éva Szeli

Seattle University Law Review

First, this Article will discuss schizophrenia and its impact on these individuals and their families. Family variables in the course of the disorder will be highlighted. Then, this Article will review the legal power afforded such families by ex parte provisions in civil commitment statutes using the involuntary examination portion of the Florida mental health code as a model. Finally, this Article will assess this system of civil commitment available to care-giving families in therapeutic jurisprudential terms, with recommendations for maximizing the therapeutic consequences and minimizing the antitherapeutic consequences of ex parte procedures.


Mdri: Pioneering Strategies For International Enforcement Of Mental Disability Rights, Max Lapertosa, Eric Rosenthal Jan 1995

Mdri: Pioneering Strategies For International Enforcement Of Mental Disability Rights, Max Lapertosa, Eric Rosenthal

Human Rights Brief

No abstract provided.