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Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Due Process Supreme Court Appellate Division Jul 2019

Due Process Supreme Court Appellate Division

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Don't Call Me Crazy: A Survey Of America's Mental Health System, Justin L. Joffe Jul 2015

Don't Call Me Crazy: A Survey Of America's Mental Health System, Justin L. Joffe

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Unfortunately, the typical exposure to mental illness for most Americans comes via tragic mass shootings or highly publicized celebrity mental breakdowns. However, the vast majority of mentally ill individuals are not violent murderers or hyper-tweeting celebrities. Rather, they are the ordinary, everyday people that make up the tens of millions of American adults suffering from some form of mental illness. The American mental health system has a lamentable history. The initial policy of locking up mentally ill individuals in jails transitioned to a system of confinement in asylums that quickly became notorious for their poor living conditions and treatment. The ...


Looking Backward: The Twentieth Century Revolutions In Psychiatry, Law And Public Mental Health, Sheldon Gelman May 2014

Looking Backward: The Twentieth Century Revolutions In Psychiatry, Law And Public Mental Health, Sheldon Gelman

Sheldon Gelman

Do histories of psychiatry make a difference--or have legal implications--in the present? Does our current situation help explain what historians say about psychiatry's past? Focusing on the past half century--the era of medications-- this paper explores the reciprocal relationship between the present and the past in psychiatry. Part II sketches the medical developments that constitute the subjects of any history of psychiatry. This Part also examines related developments in law. Part III introduces some problems of psychiatric historiography and examines some historians' attempts to deal with them. Part IV analyzes the account of psychiatry's past contained in Edward ...


Aggressive Policing And The Mental Health Of Young Urban Men, Amanda Geller, Jeffrey Fagan, Tom Tyler, Bruce Link Jan 2014

Aggressive Policing And The Mental Health Of Young Urban Men, Amanda Geller, Jeffrey Fagan, Tom Tyler, Bruce Link

Faculty Scholarship

We provide the first population-based analysis of the mental health implications of contemporary policing. Many cities have adopted “proactive” policing models, which engage citizens – often aggressively – at low levels of suspicion. We survey young men on their experiences of police encounters and subsequent mental health. We conducted a population-based phone survey of 1,261 young men in New York City. Respondents reported how many times they were approached by New York Police Department (NYPD) officers, what these encounters entailed, any trauma they attributed to the stops, and their overall anxiety. Data were analyzed using cross-sectional regressions. Participants reporting more police ...


All Roads Lead From Vietnam To Your Home Town: How Veterans Have Become Casualties Of The War On Drugs, Susan Stuart Nov 2013

All Roads Lead From Vietnam To Your Home Town: How Veterans Have Become Casualties Of The War On Drugs, Susan Stuart

Susan P. Stuart

No abstract provided.


All Roads Lead From Vietnam To Your Home Town: How Veterans Have Become Casualties Of The War On Drugs, Susan Stuart Jan 2013

All Roads Lead From Vietnam To Your Home Town: How Veterans Have Become Casualties Of The War On Drugs, Susan Stuart

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Empathy For Psychopaths: Using Fmri Brain Scans To Plea For Leniency In Death Penalty Cases, Kimberly D. Phillips Dec 2012

Empathy For Psychopaths: Using Fmri Brain Scans To Plea For Leniency In Death Penalty Cases, Kimberly D. Phillips

Kimberly D Phillips

Most of the public agrees that society is safer without psychopaths.
However, a new sentencing strategy for psychopaths facing the death
penalty has erupted from both mental health researchers and defense
lawyers-imploring juries to view a defendant's psychopathy as a
consideration of sentencing mitigation, and, consequently, urging juries to
impose life imprisonment instead of the death penalty.

This article explains the frightening nature of psychopaths, how
neuroscience and neuroimaging intersects with the study of psychopathy,
and, specifically, whether an fiMRI brain scan is appropriate mitigating
evidence in death penalty sentencing hearings when the convicted
defendant is a diagnosed psychopath.


When Coercion Lacks Care: Competency To Make Medical Treatment Decisions And Parens Patriae Civil Commitments, Dora W. Klein Apr 2012

When Coercion Lacks Care: Competency To Make Medical Treatment Decisions And Parens Patriae Civil Commitments, Dora W. Klein

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The subject of this Article is people who have been civilly committed under a state's parens patriae authority to care for those who are unable to care for themselves. These are people who, because of a mental illness, are a danger to themselves. Even after they have been determined to be so disabled by their mental illness that they cannot care for themselves, many are nonetheless found to be competent to refuse medical treatment. Competency to make medical treatment decisions generally requires only a capacity to understand a proposed treatment, not an actual or rational understanding of that treatment ...


Institutes Of Higher Education, Safety Swords, And Privacy Shields: Reconciling Ferpa And The Common Law, Stephanie D. Humphries Jan 2008

Institutes Of Higher Education, Safety Swords, And Privacy Shields: Reconciling Ferpa And The Common Law, Stephanie D. Humphries

Stephanie D Humphries

In light of the Virginia Tech shootings, this Note argues that both FERPA and the common law contain internal tensions regarding safety and privacy that neither Congress nor the courts have adequately reconciled, and that important discrepancies regarding information sharing exist between IHEs' practices, the common law's demands, and FERPA's limitations.

Part I provides background on FERPA and argues that FERPA's emergency exception is too narrow and confusing, so that IHEs default to the nondisclosure option rather than disclosing information to third parties, such as parents, when students threaten to harm themselves or others. At the same ...


Smoke-Free State Psychiatric Facility Grounds: Is Legislation Necessary And Appropriate To Remove Tobacco From These Treatment Settings?, Maureen Hackett M.D. Jan 2008

Smoke-Free State Psychiatric Facility Grounds: Is Legislation Necessary And Appropriate To Remove Tobacco From These Treatment Settings?, Maureen Hackett M.D.

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Choice To Limit Choice: Using Psychiatric Advance Directives To Manage The Effects Of Mental Illness And Support Self-Responsibility, Breanne M. Sheetz Dec 2007

The Choice To Limit Choice: Using Psychiatric Advance Directives To Manage The Effects Of Mental Illness And Support Self-Responsibility, Breanne M. Sheetz

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Psychiatric advance directives are a valuable tool for individuals with mental illnesses. Ulysses directives, in particular, allow individuals to bind themselves to treatment in advance of needing it for the purpose of overcoming illness-induced refusals. This Note evaluates the effectiveness of state advance directive statutes in three areas that are especially important for Ulysses directives: defining competency to execute, activate, and revoke directives; waiving the constitutional right to refuse treatment; and encouraging provider compliance. This Note ultimately advocates for other states to adopt provisions similar to a Washington State statute. The Washington statute authorizes Ulysses directives by allowing advance consent ...


Something Must Be Done: An Argument For The Partial Deregulation Of Research On Bipolar Disorder And The Implementation Of Rolling Informed Consent, Janalee S. Kraschnewski May 2006

Something Must Be Done: An Argument For The Partial Deregulation Of Research On Bipolar Disorder And The Implementation Of Rolling Informed Consent, Janalee S. Kraschnewski

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Bipolar disorder (BD) cripples the lives of countless individuals across the globe. The healthcare community has had difficulty securing effective, long-term treatment for this disease. This Note argues that enlarging the pool of possible research subjects through partial deregulation of BD research would facilitate the development of better treatment. This Note further proposes the implementation of a system of rolling informed consent to ensure that actual and full consent is obtained from BD research subjects.


Looking Backward: The Twentieth Century Revolutions In Psychiatry, Law And Public Mental Health, Sheldon Gelman Jan 2003

Looking Backward: The Twentieth Century Revolutions In Psychiatry, Law And Public Mental Health, Sheldon Gelman

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Do histories of psychiatry make a difference--or have legal implications--in the present? Does our current situation help explain what historians say about psychiatry's past? Focusing on the past half century--the era of medications-- this paper explores the reciprocal relationship between the present and the past in psychiatry. Part II sketches the medical developments that constitute the subjects of any history of psychiatry. This Part also examines related developments in law. Part III introduces some problems of psychiatric historiography and examines some historians' attempts to deal with them. Part IV analyzes the account of psychiatry's past contained in Edward ...


Calling Dr. Love: The Physician-Patient Sexual Relationship As Grounds For Medical Malpractice - Society Pays While The Doctor And Patient Play, Scott M. Puglise Jan 2000

Calling Dr. Love: The Physician-Patient Sexual Relationship As Grounds For Medical Malpractice - Society Pays While The Doctor And Patient Play, Scott M. Puglise

Journal of Law and Health

This note examines "consensual" sexual relationships between non-mental health physicians and patients. More specifically, it examines whether such relationships ever amount to medical malpractice. Generally, a non-mental health physician would be liable under the rubric of medical malpractice only if the sexual relationship was commenced under the guise of "medical treatment." Recent cases, however, have expanded liability in certain circumstances when the physician-patient relationship has involved "counseling matters." "Counseling matters" describes talking to patients about their feelings, or discussing personal problems not necessarily related to their proposed treatment. Medical treatment supplemented by "counseling" purportedly requires greater scrutiny due to the ...


Ex Parte Civil Commitment, Family Care-Givers, And Schizophrenia: A Therapeutic Jurisprudence Analysis, Éva Szeli Jan 2000

Ex Parte Civil Commitment, Family Care-Givers, And Schizophrenia: A Therapeutic Jurisprudence Analysis, Éva Szeli

Seattle University Law Review

First, this Article will discuss schizophrenia and its impact on these individuals and their families. Family variables in the course of the disorder will be highlighted. Then, this Article will review the legal power afforded such families by ex parte provisions in civil commitment statutes using the involuntary examination portion of the Florida mental health code as a model. Finally, this Article will assess this system of civil commitment available to care-giving families in therapeutic jurisprudential terms, with recommendations for maximizing the therapeutic consequences and minimizing the antitherapeutic consequences of ex parte procedures.


Advocacy Of The Establishment Of Mental Health Specialty Courts In The Provision Of Therapeutic Justice For Mentally Ill Offenders, Leroy L. Kondo Jan 2000

Advocacy Of The Establishment Of Mental Health Specialty Courts In The Provision Of Therapeutic Justice For Mentally Ill Offenders, Leroy L. Kondo

Seattle University Law Review

This Article explores the establishment of mental health courts as a partial solution to the perplexing societal problem that relegates mentally ill offenders to a "revolving door" existence in and out of prisons and jails.This inescapable situation results from a paucity ofeffective humanitarian policies, laws, and procedures for treating such medically disordered defendants. The establishment of mental health specialty courts is investigated as a potential means of addressing the complex legal issues and psycho-sociological problems faced by the judicial system in dealing with mentally ill offenders.


To Stay At Home: Analysis Of Rights And Recommendations On Procedures For Persons Receiving Mental Health Services In The Community , Janet L. Lowder, Franklin J. Hickman Jan 1993

To Stay At Home: Analysis Of Rights And Recommendations On Procedures For Persons Receiving Mental Health Services In The Community , Janet L. Lowder, Franklin J. Hickman

Journal of Law and Health

Before the pendulum swings back to the use of institutions as the primary treatment modality for persons with severe mental illness, there should be a re-examination of the alternatives available to community care providers to ensure compliance with treatment outside of the hospital. This article will focus on the alternatives available in the Ohio mental health system, which is fundamentally oriented towards community-based treatment, and the effects of this orientation.


Decoding Right To Refuse Treatment Law, Michael L. Perlin Jan 1993

Decoding Right To Refuse Treatment Law, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


Rights Within The Therapeutic Relationship, Patricia King Jan 1991

Rights Within The Therapeutic Relationship, Patricia King

Journal of Law and Health

My thesis is that the failure of these rights to be implemented in any meaningful way for persons with mental illness is the result of a narrow image of rights which emphasizes the individual, valuing autonomy independent of care, and sacrifices relationship and the connection to the community. By conceiving of rights in such a way, we strengthen the individual but do not address the reality of the context or relationship within which persons with mental illness will actualize these rights. This failure to recognize and account for the disequilibrium within therapeutic relationships and the necessity of caring within such ...


Foreword: Public Health & The Law—A Symposium Dedicated To Professor William J. Curran, Lawrence O. Gostin Jan 1987

Foreword: Public Health & The Law—A Symposium Dedicated To Professor William J. Curran, Lawrence O. Gostin

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This essay serves as the foreword to Public Health & the Law, a symposium dedicated to Professor William J. Curran held in 1987.

During his career, Professor Curran chaired the Harvard School of Public Health Committee on Human Research; he directed the Program in Law and Public Health; and he was co-director of the Harvard Interfaculty Program in Medical Ethics from 1973 to 1980. He was also an advisor to the World Health Organization and spent two sabbatical periods in Europe with WHO organizations. He advised and lectured in countries throughout the world.

At Harvard Law School and at the Harvard School of Public Health, Professor Curran educated three generations of lawyers who have gone on to hold varied positions of influence in the field of health law--from academia to ...


The Theory And Practice Of Civil Commitment, Andrew Scull Feb 1984

The Theory And Practice Of Civil Commitment, Andrew Scull

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Court of Last Resort: Mental Illness and the Law by Carol A.B. Warren, contributions by Stephen J. Morse and Jack Zusman


The Insanity Plea: The Uses And Abuses Of The Insanity Defense, Michigan Law Review Feb 1984

The Insanity Plea: The Uses And Abuses Of The Insanity Defense, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Insanity Plea: The Uses and Abuses of the Insanity Defense by William J. Winslade and Judith Wilson Ross


Equality, "Anisonomy," And Justice: A Review Of Madness And The Criminal Law, Andrew Von Hirsch Feb 1984

Equality, "Anisonomy," And Justice: A Review Of Madness And The Criminal Law, Andrew Von Hirsch

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Madness and the Criminal Law by Norval Morris


Mental Health Law: Major Issues, Michigan Law Review Mar 1982

Mental Health Law: Major Issues, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Mental Health Law: Major Issues by David B. Wexler


Conscience And Convenience: The Asylum And Its Alternatives In Progressive America, Michigan Law Review Mar 1981

Conscience And Convenience: The Asylum And Its Alternatives In Progressive America, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Conscience and Convenience: The Asylum and Its Alternatives in Progressive America by David J. Rothman


Missouri's New Mental Health Act: The Problems With Progress, Valerie Hughes Staulcup Jan 1979

Missouri's New Mental Health Act: The Problems With Progress, Valerie Hughes Staulcup

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Regulation Of Electroconvulsive Therapy, Michigan Law Review Dec 1976

Regulation Of Electroconvulsive Therapy, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Regulation of ECT has generally focused on whether the patient or his representative effectively consented to the treatment. The highly intrusive nature of ECT and the unique circumstances of those patients who are likely to receive it create particularly difficult legal issues concerning the validity of the patient's consent. This Note will examine the various methods that are available to protect the rights of patients for whom ECT is proposed. After briefly explaining the nature of the therapy, the Note will discuss the efficacy of judicial remedies with respect to both competent and incompetent patients. It will argue that ...


Michigan's Revised Mental Health Code, William David Serwer Jan 1976

Michigan's Revised Mental Health Code, William David Serwer

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This note will evaluate the three chapters of the Michigan Code which present the most significant legislative attempts to safeguard the rights of the mentally ill. Chapter Four of the Code extends several traditional due process guarantees to the civil commitment process. By guaranteeing the right to adequate notice, the right to be present at the hearing, the right to be represented by counsel, and the right to notice of trial by jury, the Code offers better protection from unwarranted commitment. However, due to the difficulty of defining mental illness and accurately identifying those in need of treatment, the possibility ...


Hew Proposed Policy On The Protection Of Human Subjects: Experimentation And The Institutionalized Mentally Disabled Jan 1975

Hew Proposed Policy On The Protection Of Human Subjects: Experimentation And The Institutionalized Mentally Disabled

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Civil Commitment: Recognition Of Patients’ Right To Treatment, Donaldson V. O’Connor, 493 F.2d 507 (5th Cir. 1974) Jan 1974

Civil Commitment: Recognition Of Patients’ Right To Treatment, Donaldson V. O’Connor, 493 F.2d 507 (5th Cir. 1974)

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.