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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Productivity And Affinity In The Age Of Dignity, Stephen Lee Apr 2016

Productivity And Affinity In The Age Of Dignity, Stephen Lee

Michigan Law Review

This Review proceeds as follows. Part I summarizes The Age of Dignity. Part II explains how this segment of immigrant workers challenges the productivity/affinity binary that dominates immigration law’s formal migration rules. Part III shows how this binary sets up dual migration streams, both of which could account for future flows of care workers. As Part III shows, the example of the eldercare industry nicely illustrates how the employment based and family-based migration systems simply represent two different ways of filling labor needs. I then conclude.


Administrative Oversight Of State Medicaid Payment Policies:Giving Teeth To The Equal Access Provision, Julia Bienstock Feb 2016

Administrative Oversight Of State Medicaid Payment Policies:Giving Teeth To The Equal Access Provision, Julia Bienstock

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Wage Theft As Public Larceny, Elizabeth J. Kennedy Jan 2016

Wage Theft As Public Larceny, Elizabeth J. Kennedy

Brooklyn Law Review

Home care for the elderly and disabled is a rapidly expanding industry in which structural and regulatory factors contribute to worker vulnerability and exploitation. Systemic exclusion from core federal employment and labor laws, as well as many state and local regulations, results in minimal consequences for employers who violate standards. Despite recent movement at the federal level to create a “new mindset” of rights and regulations, home care workers must be equipped with creative ways to enforce these new rights and to challenge existing gaps in enforcement. With the understanding that two-thirds of the home care industry is financed by ...


Premiums And Section 1115 Waivers: What Cost Medicaid Expansion?, Sidney D. Watson Jan 2016

Premiums And Section 1115 Waivers: What Cost Medicaid Expansion?, Sidney D. Watson

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

States reluctant to adopt the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion are demanding that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services grant them Section 1115 demonstration waivers that allow them to charge poor people premiums.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has yielded to these demands, granting five states waivers of long standing federal statutory protections that limit state discretion to impose premiums for Medicaid. These premium waivers present a fundamental problem of law because the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has no statutory authority to grant Section 1115 ...


Key Issues Facing Medicaid After The Affordable Care Act, Marybeth Musumeci Jan 2016

Key Issues Facing Medicaid After The Affordable Care Act, Marybeth Musumeci

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Medicaid, Managed Care, And The Mission For The Poor, John V. Jacobi Jan 2016

Medicaid, Managed Care, And The Mission For The Poor, John V. Jacobi

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

Medicaid has financed care for the poor for five decades. During that time it has balanced two important missions: providing for the particular health needs of the poor, and mainstreaming care for the poor. These roles have been consistent as all insurance payors—public and private—have shifted away from passively funding fragmented care to actively supporting patient-centered coordinated care. But the health needs of the poor go beyond medical interventions; the health status of the poor depends on the provision of social services to address social determinants of health, including housing, nutrition, and employment training services. Unlike non-poor insureds ...


Pin The Tail On The Donkey: Beneficiary Enforcement Of The Medicaid Act Over Time, Jane Perkins Jan 2016

Pin The Tail On The Donkey: Beneficiary Enforcement Of The Medicaid Act Over Time, Jane Perkins

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

During the twentieth century, Congress enacted legislation designed to improve the lives of low-income Americans. A number of these laws were enacted by Congress pursuant to the Constitution’s Spending Clause, including the Medicaid Act, which entitles certain low-income individuals to publicly funded health insurance coverage. As enacted in 1965, the Medicaid Act did not include a provision authorizing the statute’s beneficiaries to bring private enforcement actions in court. Since the early 1970s, however, program beneficiaries relied upon the Constitution’s Supremacy Clause or, more frequently, 42 U.S.C. § 1983 for the cause of action allowing them to ...


On The Expansion Of “Welfare” And “Health” Under Medicaid, Laura D. Hermer Jan 2016

On The Expansion Of “Welfare” And “Health” Under Medicaid, Laura D. Hermer

Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy

Medicaid was intended from its inception to provide financial access to health care for certain categories of impoverished Americans. While rooted in historical welfare programs, it was meant to afford the “deserving” poor access to the same sort of health care that other, wealthier Americans received. Yet despite this seemingly innocuous and laudable purpose, it has become a front in the political and social battles waged over the last several decades on the issues of welfare and the safety net. The latest battleground pits competing visions of Medicaid. One vision seeks to transform Medicaid from a health care program into ...


Reforming Healthcare Reform, Jacqueline Fox Jan 2016

Reforming Healthcare Reform, Jacqueline Fox

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.