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Health Law and Policy Commons

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Healthcare

2015

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

History, Governmental Structure, And Politics: Defining The Scope Of Local Board Of Health Power, Pekham Pal Nov 2015

History, Governmental Structure, And Politics: Defining The Scope Of Local Board Of Health Power, Pekham Pal

Fordham Law Review

Local boards of health often issue regulations that have broad effects that surpass the borders of the city or county to which they apply. Promulgation of such rules by board of health members appointed by the executive branch implicates separation of powers concerns; because such regulations may so extensively burden a locality’s citizens, it may be more appropriate for elected officials to adopt these regulations. Indeed, local businesses or other interested parties often bring suit challenging local board of health actions. Courts apply different analytical methodologies to review these challenges, which often leads to incongruent local health agency discretion ...


Unenumerated Rights And The Limits Of Analogy: A Critque Of The Right To Medical Self-Defense, O. Carter Snead Oct 2015

Unenumerated Rights And The Limits Of Analogy: A Critque Of The Right To Medical Self-Defense, O. Carter Snead

O. Carter Snead

Volokh’s project stands or falls with the claim that the entitlement he proposes is of constitutional dimension. If there is no fundamental right to medical self-defense, the individual must, for better or worse, yield to the regulation of this domain in the name of the values agreed to by the political branches of government. Indeed, the government routinely restricts the instrumentalities of self-help (including self-defense) in the name of avoiding what it takes to be more significant harms. This same rationale accounts for current governmental limitations on access to unapproved drugs and the current ban on organ sales. The ...


International Intellectual Property, Access To Health Care, And Human Rights: South Africa V. United States, Winston Nagan Aug 2015

International Intellectual Property, Access To Health Care, And Human Rights: South Africa V. United States, Winston Nagan

Winston P Nagan

This Article examines the question of access to patented medicines in international law. It analyzes the extent to which international agreements may lawfully limit affordable versions of these medicines that may be available through parallel imports or compulsory licensing procedures. It considers the concept of intellectual property rights from a national and international perspective to determine how these rights must be sensitive to matters of national sovereignty when extraordinary, life-threatening diseases afflict societies in catastrophic ways. This Article suggests that viewing property (including intellectual property) as a human right requires that its scope be delimited and understood in the context ...


Medicare At Fifty Needs To Grow, William H. Lane Jul 2015

Medicare At Fifty Needs To Grow, William H. Lane

English Faculty Publications

In America everybody has a healthcare story. A bill impossible to read, an inscrutable "additional" charge, trouble getting insurance, trouble keeping it, a friend or family member who's fallen between the coverage "cracks." [excerpt]


The Aca’S 2017 State Innovation Waiver: Is Erisa A Roadblock To Meaningful Healthcare Reform?, Marea B. Tumber Jun 2015

The Aca’S 2017 State Innovation Waiver: Is Erisa A Roadblock To Meaningful Healthcare Reform?, Marea B. Tumber

University of Massachusetts Law Review

In 2017, the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) State Innovation Waiver (§1332) will enable states to waive many of the ACA’s provisions and to develop their own creative solutions to reign in healthcare spending. The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) was enacted to encourage employers to sponsor benefit plans and minimize potential conflicts with existing state laws. Because of ERISA, the regulation of employee benefit plans, including health plans, falls primarily under federal jurisdiction for about 131 million people. This Note explores the ways in which ERISA presents significant roadblocks to meaningful state level healthcare reform ...


Assets, Costs, And Affordability: Why Magi-Based Medicaid Benefits Don't Account For True Need, Sara K. Hunkler May 2015

Assets, Costs, And Affordability: Why Magi-Based Medicaid Benefits Don't Account For True Need, Sara K. Hunkler

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

In 2014, Mary, an asset-wealthy individual, will qualify for Medicaid ahead of Bob, a needier individual with less net wealth and significantly higher medical costs, solely because Bob’s income is slightly higher. The current income-based eligibility standards for Medicaid mandated by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) do not adequately reflect an individual’s need for federal assistance because they neglect to consider an individual’s assets, debts, and the circumstantial cost of their healthcare. Thus, these new federal standards permit significant disparities in the treatment of similarly situated impoverished individuals and allow prioritization of asset-wealthy individuals ...


Health Law Reader: An Interdisciplinary Approach, John Robinson, Roberta Berry, Kevin Mcdonnell Apr 2015

Health Law Reader: An Interdisciplinary Approach, John Robinson, Roberta Berry, Kevin Mcdonnell

John H. Robinson

No abstract provided.


An Empirical Perspective On Medicaid As Social Insurance, Nicole Huberfeld, Jessica L. Roberts Apr 2015

An Empirical Perspective On Medicaid As Social Insurance, Nicole Huberfeld, Jessica L. Roberts

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This Essay begins to explore how Medicaid, after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, metamorphoses from exclusion and limitations in access and benefits to a form of social insurance that implicates theories of social justice. The social justice aspect of universality provides an important lens for understanding these numbers, both in terms of the states that are expanding and the states that are opting out. States that refuse to expand their Medicaid programs are denying millions of Americans the benefit of a precious legal entitlement. It is essential that the states understand the power—and the potential—of this ...


Goals Vs. Deadlines: Notes On The Va Disability Claims Backlog, Daniel L. Nagin Mar 2015

Goals Vs. Deadlines: Notes On The Va Disability Claims Backlog, Daniel L. Nagin

University of Massachusetts Law Review

Drawing primarily on policy considerations, social science research, and the relevant statutory and doctrinal frameworks within veterans benefits law, this article argues that Congress should subject the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to a clear and enforceable deadline for making initial eligibility determinations on claims for service-connected compensation. Despite widespread media coverage of delays in VA’s adjudication system and countless oversight hearings and congressional proposals for reform, this simple idea – to impose a hard deadline upon VA has either been overlooked entirely or drowned out by a preoccupation with other types of legislative responses to the VA ...


State (Un)Separated Powers And Commandeering, Aaron P. Brecher Jan 2015

State (Un)Separated Powers And Commandeering, Aaron P. Brecher

Res Gestae

This Essay argues that the Court’s line between state judges and other state officials is not as clean as the case law suggests. Specifically, early state constitutions, as well as the British constitutional order prevailing before the U.S. Constitution was enacted—which did not separate powers as rigidly as the U.S. Constitution—combine to undermine the distinction. Taking this line of analysis seriously is not to deny that commandeering state executive or legislative officials raises federalism concerns. But paying more careful attention to early state conceptions of the separation of powers furthers federalist goals in another way ...


When Condoms Fail: Making Room Under The Aca Blanket For Prep Hiv Prevention, Jason Potter Burda Jan 2015

When Condoms Fail: Making Room Under The Aca Blanket For Prep Hiv Prevention, Jason Potter Burda

Faculty Publications

Given the alarming upward trend in HIV infection rates and the downward trend in condom usage, we need a new approach to HIV prevention in the United States. One such approach, HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (commonly known as “PrEP”), has the potential to significantly reduce HIV incidence. The FDA recently approved a daily dose of Truvada® — an antiretroviral drug that suppresses the virus in HIV-positive individuals — for daily use by high-risk HIV-negative individuals to prevent infection. Despite an effectiveness above ninety percent and significant regulatory momentum, this pharmacological prevention modality has proven difficult to implement. In this Article, I address the ...


The Universality Of Medicaid At Fifty, Nicole Huberfeld Jan 2015

The Universality Of Medicaid At Fifty, Nicole Huberfeld

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This essay explores how the law of Medicaid after fifty years creates a meaningful principle of universalism by shifting from fragmentation and exclusivity to universality and inclusivity. The universality principle provides a new trajectory for all of American health care, one that is not based on individual qualities that are unrelated to medical care but rather grounded in non-judgmental principles of unification and equalization (if not outright solidarity). To that end, this Essay first will study the legislative reformation that led to universality and its quantifiable effects. The Essay then will assess and evaluate Medicaid’s new universality across four ...


Can You Diagnose Me Now? A Proposal To Modify The Fda’S Regulation Of Smartphone Mobile Health Applications With A Pre-Market Notification And Application Database Program, Stephen Mcinerney Jan 2015

Can You Diagnose Me Now? A Proposal To Modify The Fda’S Regulation Of Smartphone Mobile Health Applications With A Pre-Market Notification And Application Database Program, Stephen Mcinerney

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Advances in mobile technology continually create new possibilities for the future of medical care. Yet these changes have also created concerns about patient safety. Under the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the authority to regulate a broad spectrum of products beyond traditional medical devices like stethoscopes or pacemakers. The regulatory question is not if the FDA has the statutory authority to regulate health-related software, but rather how it will exercise its regulatory authority. In September 2013, the FDA published Final Guidance on Mobile Medical Applications; in it, the Agency limited its oversight to ...


Remodeling Federal Medical Malpractice Act: A Possible Improvement To The Affordable Care Act, Nancy Kubasek, Tiffany Durham Jan 2015

Remodeling Federal Medical Malpractice Act: A Possible Improvement To The Affordable Care Act, Nancy Kubasek, Tiffany Durham

Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review

During the debates about healthcare reform, the Congressional Budget Office found that federal medical liability reform could drastically reduce federal budget deficits, yet political and legal scholars could not reach agreement about the best way for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) to provide such reform. Instead, provisions were made to fund state level demonstration projects. The law that is considered one of the most successful models to date of conventional tort reform is the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act of California. This Article exams that legislation and discusses how we might use what can be learned from ...