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Articles 1 - 30 of 105

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Improving Outcomes In Child Poverty And Wellness In Appalachia In The "New Normal" Era: Infusing Empathy Into Law, Jill C. Engle Aug 2019

Improving Outcomes In Child Poverty And Wellness In Appalachia In The "New Normal" Era: Infusing Empathy Into Law, Jill C. Engle

Jill Engle

No abstract provided.


How Much Of Health Care Antitrust Is Really Antitrust?, Spencer Weber Waller Jul 2019

How Much Of Health Care Antitrust Is Really Antitrust?, Spencer Weber Waller

Spencer Weber Waller

No abstract provided.


Moving Beyond Medical Debt, Brook E. Gotberg, Michael D. Sousa Jul 2019

Moving Beyond Medical Debt, Brook E. Gotberg, Michael D. Sousa

Faculty Publications

In recent years it has become clear that medical costs are imposing severe financial burdens on American families, sometimes to the point that bankruptcy becomes the only escape from crippling debt. When evaluating the well-established connection between outstanding medical debt and consumer bankruptcy, most existing empirical studies attempt to quantify the percentage of consumer bankruptcies that are "caused" by unmanageable medical indebtedness. This Article addresses what we believe to be a more significant line of empirical inquiry, namely, the connection between health insurance coverage and consumer bankruptcy as a more precise measurement of how national health insurance programs may or ...


A Prescription For Charity Care: How National Medical Debt Ills Can Be Alleviated By Integrating State Financial Assistance Policies Into The Nonprofit Tax Exemption, Margarita Kutsin Feb 2019

A Prescription For Charity Care: How National Medical Debt Ills Can Be Alleviated By Integrating State Financial Assistance Policies Into The Nonprofit Tax Exemption, Margarita Kutsin

Seattle University Law Review

Despite having the most expensive healthcare system in the world, the United States has been consistently ranked as having the worst system in terms of equity, efficiency, and healthcare outcomes among industrialized nations. The effects of these systemic issues are grounded in the patient experience as nearly forty-four percent of individuals have forgone recommended treatments and thirty-two percent have reported that they were unable to afford a prescription due to the high cost, according to a study conducted in 2018. Health is sacred, and financial circumstances should not determine the difference between treatment and illness, or life and death. “Financial ...


The Duality Of Provider And Payer In The Current Healthcare Landscape And Related Antitrust Implications, Julia Kapchinskiy Oct 2018

The Duality Of Provider And Payer In The Current Healthcare Landscape And Related Antitrust Implications, Julia Kapchinskiy

San Diego Law Review

Health care landscape has changed with the introduction of the ACA and will keep changing due to the proposed repeal. The only constant is the desire of health plans and providers to maximize profits and minimize costs, which is attainable through consolidation. This Comment advocates a revision of the existing antitrust guidelines that would (1) recognize unique nature of health care market, (2) be independent from the current or proposed legislation to the maximum possible extent, and (3) reflect the insurer-provider duality, which heavily influences the quality and accessibility of the healthcare for the consumer.


The Global Person: Pig-Human Embryos, Personhood, And Precision Medicine, Yvonne Cripps Jul 2018

The Global Person: Pig-Human Embryos, Personhood, And Precision Medicine, Yvonne Cripps

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

Chimeras, in the form of pig-human embryos engineered by CRISPR-Cas9 and other biotechnologies, have been created as potential sources of organs for transplantation. Against that background, and in an era of "precision medicine," this Article examines the concept of the global genetically modified person and asks whether humanness and personhood are being eroded, or finding new boundaries in intellectual property and constitutional law.


Alienage Classifications And The Denial Of Health Care To Dreamers, Fatma E. Marouf May 2018

Alienage Classifications And The Denial Of Health Care To Dreamers, Fatma E. Marouf

Fatma Marouf

In the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), passed in 2010, Congress provided that only “lawfully present” individuals could obtain insurance through the Marketplaces established under the Act. Congress left it to the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) to define who is “lawfully present.” Initially, HHS included all individuals with deferred action status, which is an authorized period of stay but not a legal status. After President Obama announced a new policy of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (“DACA”) in June 2012, however, HHS amended its regulation specifically to exclude DACA recipients from the definition of “lawfully present.” The revised ...


Black Lung In The 21st Century: Disease, Law, And Policy, Evan Barrett Smith Apr 2018

Black Lung In The 21st Century: Disease, Law, And Policy, Evan Barrett Smith

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Improving Outcomes In Child Poverty And Wellness In Appalachia In The "New Normal" Era: Infusing Empathy Into Law, Jill C. Engle Apr 2018

Improving Outcomes In Child Poverty And Wellness In Appalachia In The "New Normal" Era: Infusing Empathy Into Law, Jill C. Engle

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (March 2018): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Mar 2018

Law Library Blog (March 2018): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


No Pay For Sexist Performance: How Gender Disparities In Healthcare Hurt Hospitals’ Pay For Performance Reimbursements, Emily C. Bartlett Jan 2018

No Pay For Sexist Performance: How Gender Disparities In Healthcare Hurt Hospitals’ Pay For Performance Reimbursements, Emily C. Bartlett

Washington University Law Review

Gender disparities and discrimination in healthcare treatment are vast. Women in pain are deemed hysterical, heart attacks in women are caught less frequently than in men due to symptom presentation differences, and women are screened less often than men for some cancers. Meanwhile, in order to be fully reimbursed for healthcare services, legislative reforms increasingly evaluate hospitals and physicians based on their performance as it relates to quality measurements, otherwise known as pay for performance. This particular method of reimbursement expanded after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) enacted pay for performance standards, particularly for hospitals and physicians ...


What Congress's Repeal Efforts Can Teach Us About Regulatory Reform, Cary Coglianese, Gabriel Scheffler Dec 2017

What Congress's Repeal Efforts Can Teach Us About Regulatory Reform, Cary Coglianese, Gabriel Scheffler

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Major legislative actions during the early part of the 115th Congress have undermined the central argument for regulatory reform measures such as the REINS Act, a bill that would require congressional approval of all new major regulations. Proponents of the REINS Act argue that it would make the federal regulatory system more democratic by shifting responsibility for regulatory decisions away from unelected bureaucrats and toward the people’s representatives in Congress. But separate legislative actions in the opening of the 115th Congress only call this argument into question. Congress’s most significant initiatives during this period — its derailed attempts to ...


Erisa And Graham-Cassidy: A Disaster In Waiting For Employee Health Benefits And For Dependents Under 26 On Their Parents’ Plans, Leslie Francis Sep 2017

Erisa And Graham-Cassidy: A Disaster In Waiting For Employee Health Benefits And For Dependents Under 26 On Their Parents’ Plans, Leslie Francis

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

Graham Cassidy § 105 would repeal the ACA “employer mandate”. Although its sponsors claim that the bill will give states a great deal of flexibility, it will do nothing to help states ensure that employers provide their employees with decent health insurance; quite the reverse. It will also give employers the freedom to ignore the popular ACA requirement that allows children up to age 26 to receive coverage through their parent’ plans, at least when their parents get health insurance from their employers. Here’s why.


Can You Keep It? An Examination Of The Individual Health Insurance Market, Rachael Carnale May 2017

Can You Keep It? An Examination Of The Individual Health Insurance Market, Rachael Carnale

Honors Scholar Theses

The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA, ACA, or Obamacare) in 2010 significantly altered the structure of the individual health insurance market. The new regulatory environment and establishment of the health insurance exchanges forced insurers to adopt to be successful in the reformed individual market. However, the complexity of the law and uncertainty surrounding both the law itself and the newly insured have threatened the stability of the individual market. This thesis will explore the history of the individual health insurance market, the issues that current afflict the exchanges, and viability of possible solutions. Special attention ...


Dinner For Two: Employer Mandate, Meet Erisa; How Dave & Buster’S Response To The Affordable Care Act’S Employer Mandate May Open The Door For Employees To Seek Erisa Relief, Kendall Victoria Dacey Mar 2017

Dinner For Two: Employer Mandate, Meet Erisa; How Dave & Buster’S Response To The Affordable Care Act’S Employer Mandate May Open The Door For Employees To Seek Erisa Relief, Kendall Victoria Dacey

Pepperdine Law Review

When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) became law in late March, 2010, Dave & Buster’s (D&B) had a choice: it could either comply and offer its full-time employees the minimum health insurance coverage required by the new “employer mandate” or it could ignore the new requirements and incur a penalty. Dissatisfied with either option, D&B made the drastic decision to circumvent the ACA entirely, and reduced its full-time staff below the ACA’s employee threshold so as to avoid triggering any penalty or having to pay increased health care costs. However, by dodging the employer mandate, D&B ...


How Much Of Health Care Antitrust Is Really Antitrust?, Spencer Weber Waller Jan 2017

How Much Of Health Care Antitrust Is Really Antitrust?, Spencer Weber Waller

Faculty Publications & Other Works

No abstract provided.


The Affordable Care Act Is Not Tort Reform, Andrew F. Popper Nov 2016

The Affordable Care Act Is Not Tort Reform, Andrew F. Popper

Andrew Popper

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Prior to the enactment of the PPACA, Congress held several hearings focused on subrogation and relaxation of collateral source restrictions as well as caps on damages in an effort to promote tort reform. While the ACA included provisions on medical liability reform, the suggested tort reform was thwarted, and the ACA had no actual legal effect on limiting medical malpractice liability. This article argues that the reality is that the PPACA has done nothing to change the admissibility of collateral sources nor has it enhanced ...


A Promise Realized? A Critical Review Of Accountable Care Organizations Since The Enactment Of The Affordable Care Act, Jean Phillip Shami Nov 2016

A Promise Realized? A Critical Review Of Accountable Care Organizations Since The Enactment Of The Affordable Care Act, Jean Phillip Shami

University of Miami Law Review

As the six-year anniversary of the passage of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) comes to a close, a critical review of one of the key inventions of the ACA—Accountable Care Organizations (“ACOs”)—is timely as part of the greater narrative around affordable, quality health care in America. This Comment begins with a discussion of the statutory creation, philosophy and vision, and organizational structure of ACOs in the context of the passage of the ACA in 2010. Then, it will critically review ACOs from three perspectives based on the ACO model’s mission to provide better care for more people ...


Surviving The Storm 2016: Employee Benefit Compliance & Employment Law Update, George Thompson, Brooks R. Magratten, Mark A. Pogue, Kelli Viera, Cecily Banks, Roger Williams University School Of Law Sep 2016

Surviving The Storm 2016: Employee Benefit Compliance & Employment Law Update, George Thompson, Brooks R. Magratten, Mark A. Pogue, Kelli Viera, Cecily Banks, Roger Williams University School Of Law

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Testing For Regulatory Penalties: Insuring The Health Of Fedrealism In The Age Of Obamacare, Steven Z. Hodaszy Sep 2016

Testing For Regulatory Penalties: Insuring The Health Of Fedrealism In The Age Of Obamacare, Steven Z. Hodaszy

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Overtreatment And Informed Consent: A Fraud-Based Solution To Unwanted And Unnecessary Care, Isaac D. Buck Apr 2016

Overtreatment And Informed Consent: A Fraud-Based Solution To Unwanted And Unnecessary Care, Isaac D. Buck

Florida State University Law Review

According to multiple accounts, the administration of American health care results in as much as $800 billion in wasted spending due largely to the provision of overly expensive, inefficient, and unnecessary services. Beyond inflicting fiscal pain on the nation’s pocketbook, this waste has no clinical benefit—and often results in unnecessary hospital stays, cascading follow-up procedures, and time-wasting inconvenience for American patients. But aside from the mere annoyance of unnecessary care, the administration of overtreatment—that is, unnecessary care in and of itself—causes harm to the patient. Excessive care is deficient care. Unnecessary care risks potential medical error ...


The Affordable Care Act Is Not Tort Reform, Andrew F. Popper Feb 2016

The Affordable Care Act Is Not Tort Reform, Andrew F. Popper

Catholic University Law Review

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Prior to the enactment of the PPACA, Congress held several hearings focused on subrogation and relaxation of collateral source restrictions as well as caps on damages in an effort to promote tort reform. While the ACA included provisions on medical liability reform, the suggested tort reform was thwarted, and the ACA had no actual legal effect on limiting medical malpractice liability. This article argues that the reality is that the PPACA has done nothing to change the admissibility of collateral sources nor has it enhanced ...


The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act And Choice In Childbirth: How The Aca's Nondiscrimination Provisions May Change The Legal Landscape Of Childbirth, Caitlin Mccartney Jan 2016

The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act And Choice In Childbirth: How The Aca's Nondiscrimination Provisions May Change The Legal Landscape Of Childbirth, Caitlin Mccartney

American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law

No abstract provided.


Alienage Classifications And The Denial Of Health Care To Dreamers, Fatma Marouf Jan 2016

Alienage Classifications And The Denial Of Health Care To Dreamers, Fatma Marouf

Washington University Law Review

In the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), passed in 2010, Congress provided that only “lawfully present” individuals could obtain insurance through the Marketplaces established under the Act. Congress left it to the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) to define who is “lawfully present.” Initially, HHS included all individuals with deferred action status, which is an authorized period of stay but not a legal status. After President Obama announced a new policy of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (“DACA”) in June 2012, however, HHS amended its regulation specifically to exclude DACA recipients from the definition of “lawfully present.” The revised ...


Health Care And The Myth Of Self-Reliance, Nicole Huberfeld, Jessica L. Roberts Jan 2016

Health Care And The Myth Of Self-Reliance, Nicole Huberfeld, Jessica L. Roberts

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

King v. Burwell asked the Supreme Court to decide if, in providing assistance to purchase insurance “through an Exchange established by the State,” Congress meant to subsidize policies bought on the federally run exchange. With its ruling, the Court saved the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s low-income subsidy. But King is only part of a longer, more complex story about health care access for the poor. In a move toward universal coverage, two pillars of the ACA facilitate health insurance coverage for low-income Americans, one private and one public: (1) the subsidy and (2) Medicaid expansion. Although both ...


Instrumental And Transformative Medical Technology, Nicole Huberfeld Jan 2016

Instrumental And Transformative Medical Technology, Nicole Huberfeld

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This Article considers how medical technologies impact universality in health care. The universality principle, as embodied in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), eliminated widespread discriminatory practices and provided financial assistance to those otherwise unable to become insured—a democratizing federal act that was intended to stabilize health care policy nationwide. This Article posits that medical technology, as with all of medicine, can be universalizing or exclusionary and that this status roughly correlates to its being “instrumental technology” or “transformative technology.” Instrumental technology acts as a tool of medicine and often serves an existing aspect of health care ...


The Double-Edged Sword Of Health Care Integration: Consolidation And Cost Control, Erin C. Fuse Brown, Jaime S. King Jan 2016

The Double-Edged Sword Of Health Care Integration: Consolidation And Cost Control, Erin C. Fuse Brown, Jaime S. King

Indiana Law Journal

The average family of four in the United States spends $25,826 per year on health care. American health care costs so much because we both overuse and overpay for health care goods and services. The Affordable Care Act’s cost control policies focus on curbing overutilization by encouraging health care providers to integrate to pro-mote efficiency and eliminate waste, but the cost control policies largely ignore prices. This article examines this overlooked half of health care cost control policy: rising prices and the policy levers held by the states to address them. We challenge the conventional wisdom that reducing ...


Diy Solutions To The Hobby Lobby Problem, Kristin Haule Jan 2016

Diy Solutions To The Hobby Lobby Problem, Kristin Haule

Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review

No abstract provided.


Irresponsibly Taxing Irresponsibility: The Individual Tax Penalty Under The Affordable Care Act, Francine J. Lipman, James Owens Jan 2016

Irresponsibly Taxing Irresponsibility: The Individual Tax Penalty Under The Affordable Care Act, Francine J. Lipman, James Owens

Scholarly Works

In recent decades, Congress has used the federal income tax system increasingly to administer and deliver social benefits. This transition is consistent with the evolution of the American welfare system into workfare over the last several decades. As more and more social welfare benefits are conditioned upon work, family composition, and means-tested by income levels, the income tax system where this data is already systematically aggregated, authenticated, and processed has become the go-to administrative agency.

Nevertheless, as the National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson has noted there are “substantial differences between benefits agencies and enforcement agencies in terms of culture, mindset ...


Alienage Classifications And The Denial Of Health Care To Dreamers, Fatma E. Marouf Jan 2016

Alienage Classifications And The Denial Of Health Care To Dreamers, Fatma E. Marouf

Faculty Scholarship

In the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), passed in 2010, Congress provided that only “lawfully present” individuals could obtain insurance through the Marketplaces established under the Act. Congress left it to the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) to define who is “lawfully present.” Initially, HHS included all individuals with deferred action status, which is an authorized period of stay but not a legal status. After President Obama announced a new policy of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (“DACA”) in June 2012, however, HHS amended its regulation specifically to exclude DACA recipients from the definition of “lawfully present.” The revised ...