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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Reducing The Discount Rate, Ben L. Trachtenberg Oct 2012

Reducing The Discount Rate, Ben L. Trachtenberg

Faculty Publications

This article presents two arguments against the “discounting” of future human lives as part of cost benefit analysis, or CBA. Our first argument is that because CBA has thus far ignored evidence of rising health care expenditures, it underestimates the “willingness to pay” for health and safety that future citizens will likely exhibit, thereby undervaluing their lives. Our second argument is that until recently CBA has ignored the trend of improved material conditions in developed countries, and most agencies continue to ignore it entirely. As time advances, residents of rich countries tend to live better and spend more, meaning that ...


Party Polarization And Judicial Review: Lessons From The Affordable Care Act, Neal Devins Oct 2012

Party Polarization And Judicial Review: Lessons From The Affordable Care Act, Neal Devins

Faculty Publications

Congress paid nearly no attention to the Constitution when enacting the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010. Legislative hearings and committee reports ignored the Constitution altogether; legislative debates largely did the same. This Essay both highlights Congress’s indifference to the Constitution when enacting the ACA and examines the reasons behind this legislative failure. In particular, this Essay advances three explanations. First, Congress is generally uninterested in “public goods” like constitutional interpretation. Second, the polarization of Democrats and Republicans in Congress further depresses Congress’s interest in thinking about the Constitution; instead, the majority party seeks to limit opportunities for ...


Why Congress Did Not Think About The Constitution When Enacting The Affordable Care Act, Neal Devins Mar 2012

Why Congress Did Not Think About The Constitution When Enacting The Affordable Care Act, Neal Devins

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Breaking The Cycle Of ‘Unequal Treatment’ With Health Care Reform: Acknowledging And Addressing The Continuation Of Racial Bias, Ruqaiijah Yearby Jan 2012

Breaking The Cycle Of ‘Unequal Treatment’ With Health Care Reform: Acknowledging And Addressing The Continuation Of Racial Bias, Ruqaiijah Yearby

Faculty Publications

Since the Civil War access to health care in the United States has been racially unequal. This racially unequal access to health care remains even after the passage of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ("Title VI") and the election of an African-American President. Both of these events held the promise of equality, yet the promise has never been fulfilled. Now, many hail the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act ("ACA") as the biggest governmental step in equalizing access to health care because it has the potential to increase minority access to health ...


The Individual Mandate And The Taxing Power, Erik M. Jensen Jan 2012

The Individual Mandate And The Taxing Power, Erik M. Jensen

Faculty Publications

This article, prepared for a symposium at the Salmon P. Chase College of Law, Northern Kentucky University, considers whether the Taxing Clause provides an alternative constitutional basis, as some have recently argued, for the individual mandate in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 21 - the requirement, going into effect in 214, that most individuals acquire satisfactory health insurance or pay a penalty. The article concludes that the Taxing Clause arguments are misguided. At best, the Clause can provide authority for the penalty, not for the mandate as a whole. Furthermore, the article questions whether the penalty will be ...


What Is The Meaning Of Health? Constitutional Implications Of Defining 'Medical Necessity' And 'Essential Health Benefits' Under The Affordable Care Act, B. Jessie Hill Jan 2012

What Is The Meaning Of Health? Constitutional Implications Of Defining 'Medical Necessity' And 'Essential Health Benefits' Under The Affordable Care Act, B. Jessie Hill

Faculty Publications

One consequence of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is that government will come to play a more extensive role in healthcare decision-making by individuals and their providers. The ACA does not directly regulate access to health services, but by means of a system of funding, mandates, and penalties, it essentially requires many employers to provide, and most individuals to carry, a certain minimum level of health insurance. Governmental decisions about which medical services qualify as medically necessary and appropriate may take on a new and greater importance, because government officials will be required to decide what sorts of procedures must ...


Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts: Emphasizing The Evidence, Sharona Hoffman, Andy Podgurski Jan 2012

Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts: Emphasizing The Evidence, Sharona Hoffman, Andy Podgurski

Faculty Publications

Many analysts and users of contemporary clinical decision support ("CDS") systems have expressed grave concerns about the technology’s efficacy and functionality. Alerts generated by CDS systems are often inaccurate, and an excess of alerts leads some physicians to experience "alert fatigue" and to turn off CDS altogether. This article formulates recommendations to improve drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts.

The paper comments upon a proposal by Susan Ridgely and Michael Greenberg, who call for the development of a consensus-based "clinically significant drug-drug interaction list" that could generate limited liability protection for users. We argue that instead of creating a list of ...


All For One And One For All: Informed Consent And Public Health, Jessica Wilen Berg Jan 2012

All For One And One For All: Informed Consent And Public Health, Jessica Wilen Berg

Faculty Publications

The concept of informed consent is well established in the field of bioethics, but its application is unclear in the area of public health. The increasing prevalence of public health interventions creates a need to analyze the scope of government power as it relates to individual choice. This Article explores three different types of public health measures in which individual choice has been limited: (1) environmental interventions; (2) classic public health interventions to prevent contagious disease; and (3) public health information reporting or use. The reasons for limiting informed consent vary depending on the context, and the implications for the ...


Balancing Privacy, Autonomy, And Scientific Needs In Electronic Health Records Research, Sharona Hoffman, Andy Podgurski Jan 2012

Balancing Privacy, Autonomy, And Scientific Needs In Electronic Health Records Research, Sharona Hoffman, Andy Podgurski

Faculty Publications

The ongoing transition from paper medical files to electronic health records will provide unprecedented amounts of data for biomedical research, with the potential to catalyze significant advances in medical knowledge. But this potential can be fully realized only if the data available to researchers is representative of the patient population as a whole. Thus, allowing individual patients to exclude their health information, in keeping with traditional notions of informed consent, may compromise the research enterprise and the medical benefits it produces.

This Article analyzes the tension between realizing societal benefits from medical research and granting individual preferences for privacy. It ...


Professional Power And The Standard Of Care In Medicine, Maxwell J. Mehlman Jan 2012

Professional Power And The Standard Of Care In Medicine, Maxwell J. Mehlman

Faculty Publications

Since before the founding of the Republic, American medicine has been fighting a war to control the standard of care that physicians are expected to provide to their patients. It has waged battles on two fronts: against internal disagreements within the profession over what constitutes proper care, and against attempts to delineate the standard of care by forces outside the profession, such as private health insurers, the government, and the judicial system.


Medical Decision Making By And On Behalf Of Adolescents: Reconsidering First Principles, B. Jessie Hill Jan 2012

Medical Decision Making By And On Behalf Of Adolescents: Reconsidering First Principles, B. Jessie Hill

Faculty Publications

The school nurse cannot give your teenage daughter an aspirin for her headache without your permission, but that same daughter can get an abortion without even informing you. Or can she? The obligations on medical personnel providing care to adolescents are famously indeterminate.

Two common-law presumptions have long lurked in the background, but, far from elucidating matters, those presumptions have contributed to the state of confusion. The first presumption is that, absent any special rule, children lack the legal authority to consent to medical treatment on their own. A parallel and corresponding presumption is that parents have a legal entitlement ...


Introduction - Symposium Issue On Health Data Security Systems, Sharona Hoffman Jan 2012

Introduction - Symposium Issue On Health Data Security Systems, Sharona Hoffman

Faculty Publications

Introduction to the Health Data Security System symposium 2012 Huston, TX.


The Drugs Stop Here: A Public Health Framework To Address The Drug Shortage Crisis, Sharona Hoffman Jan 2012

The Drugs Stop Here: A Public Health Framework To Address The Drug Shortage Crisis, Sharona Hoffman

Faculty Publications

Drug shortages are emerging as a major public health threat. Grave concern has been expressed by the medical community and government officials, and the crisis has been highlighted in recent media stories. Nevertheless, little has been written to date in the legal literature about the drug shortage crisis, and this timely article begins to fill this gap. It provides a thorough analysis of the origins and implications of the drug shortage problem and formulates a multi-layered approach to addressing it. The article argues that drug shortages result from a combination of market failures and regulatory constraints. It proposes a blend ...


How The Supreme Court Doomed The Aca To Failure, Thom Lambert Jan 2012

How The Supreme Court Doomed The Aca To Failure, Thom Lambert

Faculty Publications

Now that the dust has settled somewhat, we may assess the likely consequences of the decision in National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius. This article briefly summarizes the reasoning underlying the decision's individual mandate ruling. It then considers what lies ahead for health insurance and medical care in the United States if the ACA, as modified by NFIB, is not repealed. Be warned: the picture isn't pretty.