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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Molloy V. Meier Extends Genetic Counseling Duty Of Care To Biological Mcclain Parents And Establishes That Legal Damages Must Occur Before A Wrongful Conception Action Accrues For Statute Of Limitations Purposes, Mark Hallberg, Teresa Fariss Jan 2005

Molloy V. Meier Extends Genetic Counseling Duty Of Care To Biological Mcclain Parents And Establishes That Legal Damages Must Occur Before A Wrongful Conception Action Accrues For Statute Of Limitations Purposes, Mark Hallberg, Teresa Fariss

William Mitchell Law Review

Inherited genetic disorders are a well-known cause of developmental delays in children. It is, therefore, “foreseeable” to physicians treating developmentally delayed children that parents of these children will rely on the physicians’ opinions of whether a genetic cause exists. Accordingly in 1992, when Dr. Diane Meier, a pediatrician, discovered developmental delays in S.F., the three-year-old daughter of Kimberly Flomer (now Molloy) and Robert Flomer, “accepted standards of pediatric practice” required Dr. Meier to order genetic testing, including testing for Fragile X Syndrome, one of the most common causes of inherited mental retardation. The foreseeable consequences of Dr. Meier’s ...


Note: A Painful Catch-22: Why Tort Liability For Inadequate Pain Management Will Make For Bad Medicine, James R. Blaufuss Jan 2005

Note: A Painful Catch-22: Why Tort Liability For Inadequate Pain Management Will Make For Bad Medicine, James R. Blaufuss

William Mitchell Law Review

Part I of this note reviews current issues relating to pain treatment. Part II examines theoretical justifications of proposed tort liability for inadequate pain management. Part III examines how pain mismanagement does not fit within traditional notions of medical malpractice. Part IV studies the issues relating to a physician’s role as “gate-keeper” for opioids and suggests why tort liability could compromise this legislatively imposed role. Part V examines the issue of pain management in the context of end-of-life care. Part VI discusses current shifts in pain management philosophies and explains how these movements will effectuate the changes suggested by ...


Off-Label Use And The Medical Negligence Standard Under Minnesota Law, Cynthia A. Moyer Jan 2005

Off-Label Use And The Medical Negligence Standard Under Minnesota Law, Cynthia A. Moyer

William Mitchell Law Review

Who decides whether a drug can be used off-label and under what circumstances? If a physician decides to prescribe a drug off-label, what legal issues, if any, should the physician be aware of? With the increased practice of prescribing drugs for off-label use, coupled with a somewhat dated and incomplete medical negligence standard in Minnesota, the intersection of the off-label use doctrine with Minnesota’s medical negligence standard is ripe for review. This article examines the off-label use doctrine and the medical negligence standard under Minnesota law. First, the article examines what the phrase “off-label use” means. Next, the article ...


For The Well-Being Of Minnesota’S Foster Children: What Federal Legislation Requires, Gail Chang Bohr Jan 2005

For The Well-Being Of Minnesota’S Foster Children: What Federal Legislation Requires, Gail Chang Bohr

William Mitchell Law Review

This article will discuss the federal legislation and regulations—ASFA and CFSR—that hold the states accountable for the health and well-being of children and adolescents in foster care. This article will also discuss how the Early Periodic Screening Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program, the comprehensive health care services that states are required to provide through Medicaid, is used to address the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents in foster care. Critical to a discussion on the well-being of foster youth is the Chafee Foster Care Independence Act of 1999 that emphasized the states’ responsibility to ensure that youth ...


Aetna V. Davila/Cigna V. Calad: A Missed Opportunity, Leonard A. Nelson Jan 2005

Aetna V. Davila/Cigna V. Calad: A Missed Opportunity, Leonard A. Nelson

William Mitchell Law Review

On June 21, 2004, the United States Supreme Court decided the health law “case of the year” in the two consolidated cases of Aetna Health, Inc. v. Davila and CIGNA HealthCare of Texas, Inc. v. Calad. The Court held that section 502(a) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) “completely preempt[s]” and thus invalidates the tort liability provisions of the Texas Health Care Liability Act (THCLA). The case could potentially affect the rights of millions of Americans in a matter of vital concern—whether they will receive the health insurance coverage promised them if they ...


Foreword: The State Of America’S Health Care System, Tommy G. Thompson Jan 2005

Foreword: The State Of America’S Health Care System, Tommy G. Thompson

William Mitchell Law Review

Thanks to technology, innovation, and creative entrepreneurs, Americans in the twenty-first century enjoy a wide variety of products and services that would astonish previous generations. Many of these innovations allow them to prevent, treat, cure, and recover from serious injuries and diseases that were once fatal. While medical knowledge and technology have surged ahead, some parts of the health care industry are still struggling to catch up. These include the ability to keep patient records up to date, prevent medical errors, and compensate patients promptly and fairly when errors do occur. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ...


Note: Exclusive Licensing Of Dna Diagnostics: Is There A Negative Effect On Quantity And Quality Of Healthcare Delivery That Compels Nih Rulemaking?, Edward Weck Jan 2005

Note: Exclusive Licensing Of Dna Diagnostics: Is There A Negative Effect On Quantity And Quality Of Healthcare Delivery That Compels Nih Rulemaking?, Edward Weck

William Mitchell Law Review

This comment surveys the costs of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) diagnostic tests and argues in favor of non-exclusive licensing as a means to provide broad access to affordable DNA diagnostic testing. Part II provides background information on genetic testing, patenting genes as applied to genetic testing, the Bayh-Dole Act, and technology transfer. In addition, Part II summarizes academic commentary regarding the implications of exclusive licensing for biotechnology. Scholars propose a number of solutions, including expanding the experimental use exception. Part III details proposed rulemaking for DNA diagnostics. Part IV reviews anecdotal examples of genetic testing for breast cancer, hereditary hemochromatosis, and ...


Conflicts Credentialing: Hospitals And The Use Of Financial Considerations To Make Medical Staffing Decisions, James W. Marks, Jayme R. Matchinski Jan 2005

Conflicts Credentialing: Hospitals And The Use Of Financial Considerations To Make Medical Staffing Decisions, James W. Marks, Jayme R. Matchinski

William Mitchell Law Review

The emerging practice of conflicts credentialing represents a significant change in the economic and professional interests of physicians and in the relationship between medical staffs and hospitals. In this article, the authors explain the interrelationship between the authority of hospitals and medical staffs to manage their respective affairs and the legal developments that have led toward conflicts credentialing. The authors next discuss the medical community’s reaction to conflicts credentialing and the legal challenges facing the use of economic factors in physician credentialing.


Minnesota: Leading The Way On Canadian Prescription Medicine Importation, Kevin Goodno, Karen Janisch Jan 2005

Minnesota: Leading The Way On Canadian Prescription Medicine Importation, Kevin Goodno, Karen Janisch

William Mitchell Law Review

In the United States, about $160 billion is spent on prescription medicines each year, with Minnesotans spending about $3 billion. The costs of prescription medicines receive so much attention in large part because, although prescription medicine costs constitute only 10.5% of total health care spending, they account for 23% of the total out-of-pocket costs that people incur when purchasing health care. Minnesota has been a leader in controlling prescription medicine costs. It has aggressively used purchasing pools when possible, and encouraged the use of lower cost, generic prescription medicines when appropriate. Even with these efforts to control costs, prescription ...


Raich, Health Care, And The Commerce Clause, Alex Kreit, Aaron Marcus Jan 2005

Raich, Health Care, And The Commerce Clause, Alex Kreit, Aaron Marcus

William Mitchell Law Review

This article considers to what extent health care may be viewed as a traditional area of state concern in the context of the Supreme Court’s revival of federalism principles, in particular limits on Congress’ Commerce Clause power, and what effect Raich v. Ashcroft, heard by the Court in the fall 2004 term, might have on these issues. Addressing these questions will necessarily involve exploration of medical marijuana policy as well as the role of the “traditional state interest” principle within the Commerce Clause. However, the central focus of this article is not what impact Raich may have on the ...


Note: Capping Noneconomic Damages In Medical Malpractice Suits Is Not The Panacea Of The “Medical Liability Crisis”, Melissa C. Gregory Jan 2005

Note: Capping Noneconomic Damages In Medical Malpractice Suits Is Not The Panacea Of The “Medical Liability Crisis”, Melissa C. Gregory

William Mitchell Law Review

This note explores the history behind the rising costs of medical malpractice insurance rates and the responsive state legislative proposals to limit noneconomic damages. The current state of health care liability and the recent federal proposals that include caps on noneconomic damages are then discussed. This note analyzes the reasons why the federal government should not cap noneconomic damages, primarily because: (1) states are better able to regulate health care, (2) noneconomic damages are not the determinate cause of rising medical malpractice insurance rates, and (3) caps infringe on equal protection guarantees by limiting compensation of medical malpractice victims. This ...