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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Turning From Damage Caps To Information Disclosure: An Alternative To Tort Reform, Kathryn Zeiler Jan 2005

Turning From Damage Caps To Information Disclosure: An Alternative To Tort Reform, Kathryn Zeiler

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Medical malpractice damage caps are among the most popular instruments of tort reform at the state level. The Bush administration proposed a federal damage cap on non-economic damages to quell the rise of medical malpractice insurance premiums despite the paucity of empirical evidence demonstrating that damage caps actually decrease premiums. This case study argues that imposing statutory caps on medical malpractice damages is not an effective method of remedying the medical malpractice insurance crisis: therefore, policymakers should consider alternatives to damage caps. In particular, evidence suggests that implementing mandatory disclosure of the contract terms between managed care organizations and physicians ...


World Health Law: Toward A New Conception Of Global Health Governance For The 21st Century, Lawrence O. Gostin Jan 2005

World Health Law: Toward A New Conception Of Global Health Governance For The 21st Century, Lawrence O. Gostin

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The international community joined together during the late twentieth century to form a world trade system. Although imperfect, the world trade system contains adjudicable and enforceable norms designed to facilitate global economic activity. Human health is at least as important as trade in terms of its effects on the wellbeing of populations. Moreover, health hazards-biological, chemical, and radionuclear-have profound global implications. Whether these threats' origins are natural, accidental, or intentional, the harms, as well as the response, transcend national frontiers and warrant a transnational response. Despite their high importance, the International Health Regulations (IHR) are antiquated, limited in scope, and ...


Preemption And Regulatory Failure, David C. Vladeck Jan 2005

Preemption And Regulatory Failure, David C. Vladeck

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This symposium was convened to address the growing and seemingly conflicting jurisprudence governing federal preemption of state damage actions. One way to evaluate the evolution of preemption law is to examine it through the lens of litigation under the preemption provision of the 1976 Medical Device Amendments ("MDA") to the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act - a provision that in many respects is typical of express preemption provisions in regulatory statutes and has spawned a high volume of litigation. The question raised in cases under the MDA is whether the Act's preemption provision nullifies state damage actions based on ...


American Medicine And The Politics Of Race, Maxwell Gregg Bloche Jan 2005

American Medicine And The Politics Of Race, Maxwell Gregg Bloche

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Straw men play a major role in the debate over racial disparity in American medicine. Most have been deployed by the disparities-denying right, but progressives intent on “outing” racism have sent forth their share. This essay flushes out the straw men while attempting to understand the competing moral premises that drive the politics of health care disparity. At bottom, arguments about the scope of disparity and discrimination in medical care are disputes about the appropriate scope of personal responsibility for life circumstances. Further research into the factors that correlate with racial differences in health care can shed light on the ...


Obesity And The Struggle Within Ourselves, Maxwell Gregg Bloche Jan 2005

Obesity And The Struggle Within Ourselves, Maxwell Gregg Bloche

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The author argues that we ought to treat our eating, exercise habits, and girth as personal matters, for the most part, but that law can and should make a contribution, as an ally of our longer-term will against our immediate cravings. Law can be our ally in this fashion without command-and-control intrusion into our private lives. Such intrusion is at odds with our core beliefs and unlikely to produce public health success. It is more likely to provoke popular backlash--one reason why some who stand to gain from our unhealthy dining choices try to cast government efforts to inform these ...


Law's Nobility, Robin West Jan 2005

Law's Nobility, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This article first aims to set out the feminist theory of Catharine MacKinnon as explicitly as possible and in a way that accounts for its incredible power. To strengthen MacKinnon's theoretical project, the article proposes some modifications to the original that are drawn from, in part, the critiques of queer theorists. The crucial departure proposed here concerns MacKinnon's "critique of desire," which in my view is deeply mistaken. Rather than distrusting the sexual desires of women as hopelessly polluted by subordination, we should be neutral -- neither critical nor confident -- regarding the degree to which our desires, if fulfilled ...