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Health Law and Policy Commons

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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Increasing Consumer Power In The Grievance And Appeal Process For Medicare Hmo Enrollees, Kenneth J. Pippin Dec 1999

Increasing Consumer Power In The Grievance And Appeal Process For Medicare Hmo Enrollees, Kenneth J. Pippin

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Federal law requires that Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) and Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) provide Medicare beneficiaries with specific grievance and appeal rights for challenging adverse decisions of these organizations. The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is charged with enforcing these regulations. Currently, however, HCFA contracts with HMOs, allowing them to enroll Medicare beneficiaries despite the fact that many of the statutory and regulatory requirements are ignored by the Medicare HMOs. This is problematic because the elderly Medicare population may not be able to independently and adequately challenge the HMO's denial of care or reimbursement. Because HCFA has been reluctant ...


Clearing The Way For An Effective Federal-State Partnership In Health Reform, Eleanor D. Kinney Jul 1999

Clearing The Way For An Effective Federal-State Partnership In Health Reform, Eleanor D. Kinney

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

At century's end, states have assumed a very different role in the design, implementation, and operation of health service programs than they did twenty-five years ago. In the current volatile political atmosphere particularly at the federal level, states have taken up the mantle of healthcare reform in the final years of the 1990s. Yet there remain problems and difficulties with the current federal-state relationship in health reform. The critical question is whether states can successfully accomplish genuine reform given its politically charged, complex and costly nature. This question takes on particular significance for the most important reform-expanding coverage to ...


Regulating Doctors, Carl E. Schneider Jul 1999

Regulating Doctors, Carl E. Schneider

Articles

Alawyer today can hardly speak to a doctor--or even be treated by one-without being assailed by lawyer jokes. These jokes go well beyond good-humored badinage and pass the line into venom and gall. They reflect, I think, the sense many doctors today have that they are embattled and endangered, cruelly subject to pervasive and perverse controls. This is puzzling, almost to the point of mystery. Doctors have long been the American profession with the greatest social prestige, the greatest wealth, and the greatest control over its work. Indeed, what other profession has been as all-conquering? One may need to go ...


Accountable Managed Care: Should We Be Careful What We Wish For?, David A. Hyman Jul 1999

Accountable Managed Care: Should We Be Careful What We Wish For?, David A. Hyman

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Managed care is exceedingly unpopular of late. Many people believe that the problem is managed care organizations (MCOs) are unaccountable. Indeed, for many people, the creation of tort-based accountability for MCOs is the touchstone for assessing legislative "reform." The case for tort-based accountability is actually quite complex, and the merits of tort-based accountability cannot be resolved with sound bites and bad anecdotes. Tort-based accountability has both costs and benefits, and little attention has been paid to the extent to which alternatives to tort-based accountability are found in existing institutional arrangements.

This Article systematically considers the extent to which alternatives to ...


Managed Care Regulation: Can We Learn From Others? The Chilean Experience, Timothy Stoltzfus Jost Jul 1999

Managed Care Regulation: Can We Learn From Others? The Chilean Experience, Timothy Stoltzfus Jost

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Because the United States relies on private insurance for financing health care to a much greater degree than do other nations, and because managed care as a form of private insurance is further developed in the United States than elsewhere, it is arguable that we have little to learn from other nations about managed care regulation. This Article tests this hypothesis with respect to Chile, a country where private insurance is widespread and managed care is emerging. It concludes that by studying the experience of other nations we might gain a larger perspective on the context of our concerns in ...