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Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Theorizing Mental Health Courts, E. Lea Johnston Jan 2012

Theorizing Mental Health Courts, E. Lea Johnston

Washington University Law Review

To date, no scholarly article has analyzed the theoretical basis of mental health courts, which currently exist in forty-three states. This Article examines the two utilitarian justifications proposed by mental health court advocates—therapeutic jurisprudence and therapeutic rehabilitation—and finds both insufficient. Therapeutic jurisprudence is inadequate to justify mental health courts because of its inability, by definition, to resolve significant normative conflict. In essence, mental health courts express values fundamentally at odds with those underlying the traditional criminal justice system. Furthermore, the sufficiency of rehabilitation, as this concept appears to be defined by mental health court advocates, depends on the ...


Sweet Dreams Aren't Made Of These: How The Va's Disability Compensation Program Leaves Veterans Alone In The Nightmare Of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Alexandra S. Haar Jan 2011

Sweet Dreams Aren't Made Of These: How The Va's Disability Compensation Program Leaves Veterans Alone In The Nightmare Of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Alexandra S. Haar

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Cognitive Theory Of Trust, Claire A. Hill, Erin Ann O'Hara Jan 2006

A Cognitive Theory Of Trust, Claire A. Hill, Erin Ann O'Hara

Washington University Law Review

Interpersonal trust is currently receiving widespread attention in theacademy. A fast-growing legal literature can draw insights from trust scholars in several other fields, including sociology, psychology,
political science, economics, neuroscience, medicine, and management to explore the effects of legal policy on the nature of trust in interpersonal relationships. The issues are fundamental and worthy of more serious exploration: To what extent do legal rules, cases, and law enforcement efforts enhance or detract from the trust present in relationships? How can a better understanding of trust help us devise tools to improve human social and economic interactions?


Involuntarily Medicating Condemned Incompetents For The Purpose Of Rendering Them Sane And Thereby Subject To Execution, Matthew S. Collins Jan 1992

Involuntarily Medicating Condemned Incompetents For The Purpose Of Rendering Them Sane And Thereby Subject To Execution, Matthew S. Collins

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Involuntary Psychiatric Treatment And Other Coercive Behavioral Interventions As Criminal Sanctions: Reflections On Vitek V. Jones, Carl J. Circo Jan 1981

Involuntary Psychiatric Treatment And Other Coercive Behavioral Interventions As Criminal Sanctions: Reflections On Vitek V. Jones, Carl J. Circo

Washington University Law Review

This Article inquires into the substantive limits on the power of government to impose coercive behavioral interventions on criminal offenders solely because of a criminal conviction and sentence.


Missouri's New Mental Health Act: The Problems With Progress, Valerie Hughes Staulcup Jan 1979

Missouri's New Mental Health Act: The Problems With Progress, Valerie Hughes Staulcup

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Hew Proposed Policy On The Protection Of Human Subjects: Experimentation And The Institutionalized Mentally Disabled Jan 1975

Hew Proposed Policy On The Protection Of Human Subjects: Experimentation And The Institutionalized Mentally Disabled

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Civil Commitment: Recognition Of Patients’ Right To Treatment, Donaldson V. O’Connor, 493 F.2d 507 (5th Cir. 1974) Jan 1974

Civil Commitment: Recognition Of Patients’ Right To Treatment, Donaldson V. O’Connor, 493 F.2d 507 (5th Cir. 1974)

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Is The Sociopath Treatable? The Contribution Of Psychiatry To A Legal Dilemma, Philipp E. Bornstein, William R. Levine Jan 1972

Is The Sociopath Treatable? The Contribution Of Psychiatry To A Legal Dilemma, Philipp E. Bornstein, William R. Levine

Washington University Law Review

This study endeavors to present for the judge, lawyer, legislator and doctor a relevant review of studies of treatment techniques to ascertain whether scientific and medical knowledge can provide treatment which will fulfill the mandate of the judicially created right to treatment. The study is particularly oriented toward reaching an interdisciplinary definition of “adequate treatment” and discusses the necessity for proper methodological procedures in relevant mental health research.


Acute Psychiatric Hospitalization Of The Mentally Ill In The Metropolis: An Empirical Study, George E. Dix Jan 1968

Acute Psychiatric Hospitalization Of The Mentally Ill In The Metropolis: An Empirical Study, George E. Dix

Washington University Law Review

Part I describes the development of the legal framework for legally-proscribed criteria for nonvoluntary hospitalization. Part II is a description of how the purportedly regulated system actually works, applied at various points in the process. While the discussion is structured as a description of the steps from the community to full-time hospitalization, the descriptions and the illustrative examples should present a fairly complete picture of the variety of situations with which a metropolitan public acute psychiatric hospitalization service is called upon to deal. Part III is a discussion of one central legal issue, the role of the judiciary in the ...