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Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Financial Impact Of The Opioid Crisis On Local Government: Quantifying Costs For Litigation And Policymaking, Elizabeth Weeks Jan 2019

Financial Impact Of The Opioid Crisis On Local Government: Quantifying Costs For Litigation And Policymaking, Elizabeth Weeks

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The opioids epidemic has had a significant impact on individuals and communities, including local governments responsible for serving and protecting those affected individuals. This is the first study of its kind to consider whether those local government costs are quantifiable, a question that has salience both for pending opioid litigation in federal and state courts and for local planning and budgeting decisions. This article first provides a detailed description of the opioid litigation landscape, including the federal multidistrict litigation (MDL) in Ohio, the Native American tribes’ actions, and various procedural and other hurdles that local government plaintiffs face in seeking ...


State Benchmark Plan Coverage Of Opioid Use Disorder Treatments And Services: Trends And Limitations, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2019

State Benchmark Plan Coverage Of Opioid Use Disorder Treatments And Services: Trends And Limitations, Stacey A. Tovino

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Professor Tovino offers a survey of state benchmark plan coverage of opioid use disorder treatments and services, and identifies trends and limitations relevant thereto. Part II of the article provides background information regarding opioid use disorder and the treatments and services available for individuals with this disorder. Part III reviews federal mental health parity law and federal mandatory mental health and substance use disorder law as applied to insurance coverage of treatments and services for opioid use disorder, with a focus on the Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) state benchmark health plan selection requirement and the effect on that ...


About A Revolution: Toward Integrated Treatment In Drug And Mental Health Courts, Sara G. Gordon Jan 2019

About A Revolution: Toward Integrated Treatment In Drug And Mental Health Courts, Sara G. Gordon

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This Article examines specialty courts, including drug, alcohol, and mental health courts, which proponents claim created a revolution in criminal justice. Defendants whose underlying crime is the result of a substance use disorder or a mental health disorder can choose to be diverted into a specialty court, where they receive treatment instead of punishment. Many of these individuals, however, do not just suffer from a substance use disorder or a mental health disorder; instead, many have a “co-occurring disorder.” Approximately 8.9 million American adults have co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, and almost half of individuals who meet ...


Florida Law, Mobile Research Applications, And The Right To Privacy, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2019

Florida Law, Mobile Research Applications, And The Right To Privacy, Stacey A. Tovino

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This Article investigates whether state law contains comprehensive privacy, security, and breach notification standards that could apply to independent scientists who conduct mobile app mediated health research. Focusing only on Florida law, this Article assesses potentially relevant and applicable sources of privacy, security, and breach notification standards for health data of the type obtained during mobile app mediated health research studies. This Article concludes that, with one exception, Florida law tends to fall into one of two categories: (1) the law contains at least one data privacy, security, or breach notification standard, but the standard is limited in application to ...


A Timely Right To Privacy, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2019

A Timely Right To Privacy, Stacey A. Tovino

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On December 28, 2017, the federal Department of Health and Human Services ("HHS") settled its fiftieth case involving potential violations of the privacy, security, and breach notification rules ("Rules") that implement the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act ("HIPAA") and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act ("HITECH"). This Article catalogues and examines currently available enforcement actions involving the HIPAA and HITECH Rules, including the cases in which HHS has entered into a settlement agreement with a HIPAA covered entity or business associate, the cases in which HHS has imposed a civil money penalty on a HPAA ...


Fraud, Abuse, And Opioids, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2019

Fraud, Abuse, And Opioids, Stacey A. Tovino

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This Article analyzes recent government enforcement actions involving two health care fraud and abuse authorities, including the federal Anti- Kickback Statute and the federal civil False Claims Act, in cases involving opioids.

Part II of this Article examines recent government enforcement actions involving the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, which prohibits (among other conduct) the exchange of remuneration for opioid prescriptions, patient referrals for drug testing services, and patient referrals for addiction treatment services if such prescriptions or services are reimbursed in whole or in part by a federal health care program.

Part III of this Article examines recent government enforcement actions ...


How Dreamland Colored My Summer Vacation And Thinking About The Opioid Epidemic, Elizabeth Leonard Jan 2018

How Dreamland Colored My Summer Vacation And Thinking About The Opioid Epidemic, Elizabeth Leonard

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Book Review of Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic by Sam Quinones,(2018).


Medicalization Of Rural Poverty: Challenges For Access, Elizabeth Weeks Jan 2018

Medicalization Of Rural Poverty: Challenges For Access, Elizabeth Weeks

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This article was prepared for a live conference, on “The Medicalization of Poverty,” held at the University of Illinois College of Law, and a symposium to be published in the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics. My piece focuses on a constellation of challenges for health care delivery and access to care in rural areas. Discussions regarding health and poverty often seem to focus on the admittedly persistent and multilayered problems of the urban poor: unemployment, substandard and unaffordable housing, violent crime, nutrition and “food desserts,” recreation and safe outdoor spaces, and under-resourced public schools, to name a few. While cities ...


Health Care Reform: What Has Been Accomplished What Comes Next, David Orentlicher Jan 2018

Health Care Reform: What Has Been Accomplished What Comes Next, David Orentlicher

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No abstract provided.


A Right To Care, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2018

A Right To Care, Stacey A. Tovino

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In this Article, Professor Stacey Tovino examines the right to care through a personal and historical lens, then attempts to fill a scholarly gap in legal literature surrounding the right to skilled care and rehabilitation for patients with group or commercial insurance. Professor Tovino first recounts the history of Medicare coverage for skilled care and rehabilitation, then she examines the limitations of group and commercial insurance, finally concluding by asserting a right to care.


Law, Religion, And Health Care, David Orentlicher Jan 2018

Law, Religion, And Health Care, David Orentlicher

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No abstract provided.


Adjudicating Religious Sincerity, Nathan Chapman Jan 2017

Adjudicating Religious Sincerity, Nathan Chapman

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Recent disputes about the “contraception mandate” under the Affordable Care Act and about the provision of goods and services for same-sex weddings have drawn attention to the law of religious accommodations. So far, however, one of the requirements of a religious accommodation claim has escaped sustained scholarly attention: a claimant must be sincere. Historically, scholars have contested this requirement on the ground that adjudicating religious sincerity requires government officials to delve too deeply into religious questions, something the Establishment Clause forbids. Until recently, however, the doctrine was fairly clear: though the government may not evaluate the objective accuracy or plausibility ...


Teaching The Law Of American Health Care, Elizabeth Weeks, Nicole Huberfeld, Kevin Outterson Jan 2017

Teaching The Law Of American Health Care, Elizabeth Weeks, Nicole Huberfeld, Kevin Outterson

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In writing our casebook, The Law of American Health Care, we started from scratch, rethinking the topics to include and themes around which to organize them. Like many health law professors, we were schooled in and continued to propound the traditional themes of cost, quality, access, and choice. While those concerns certainly pervade many areas of health care law, our casebook's overarching themes emphasize different issues, namely: federalism, individual rights, fiduciary relationships, the modem administrative state, and market regulation. These new themes, we believe, better capture the range of issues and topics essential for the new generation of health ...


On Health, Law, And Religion, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2017

On Health, Law, And Religion, Stacey A. Tovino

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The Supreme Court recently decided a number of cases involving health, law, and religion, including Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, Zubik v. Burwell, and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. These cases were important for understanding constitutional undue burden limitations and the boundaries of religious exercise during the Obama Administration. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court's recent opinions addressing health, law, and religion have little value for many health law professors and most practicing health care attorneys. These individuals, tasked with teaching and applying the thousands of federal and state statutes, regulations, and government guidance documents that address a wide ...


Teaching The Hipaa Privacy Rule, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2017

Teaching The Hipaa Privacy Rule, Stacey A. Tovino

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Twenty years ago, President Clinton signed the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) into law. Over the past two decades, the federal Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has published several sets of rules implementing the Administrative Simplification provisions within HIPAA as well as the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical (HITECH) Act within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). These rules include, but certainly are not limited to, a final rule published on January 25, 2013, governing the use and disclosure of protected health information by covered entities and their business associates (the ...


The Use And Abuse Of Mutual-Support Programs In Drug Courts, Sara G. Gordon Jan 2017

The Use And Abuse Of Mutual-Support Programs In Drug Courts, Sara G. Gordon

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There is a large gap between what we know about the disease of addiction and its appropriate treatment, and the treatment received by individuals who are ordered into treatment as a condition of participation in drug court. Most medical professionals are not appropriately trained about addiction and most addiction treatment providers do not have the education and training necessary to provide appropriate evidence-based services to individuals who are referred by drug courts for addiction treatment. This disconnect between our understanding of addiction and available addiction treatment has wide-reaching impact for individuals who attempt to receive medical care for addiction in ...


The Hipaa Privacy Rule And The Eu Gdpr: Illustrative Comparisons, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2017

The Hipaa Privacy Rule And The Eu Gdpr: Illustrative Comparisons, Stacey A. Tovino

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In this Article, Professor Tovino compares and contrasts three illustrative concepts and rights in the Privacy Rule and/or the GDPR, including the concepts of authorization and consent, the rights of amendment and rectification, and the right to erasure. Identified similarities reflect the core values of HHS and the EU with respect to maintaining the confidentiality and privacy of personal data and protected health information, respectively. Identified differences reflect the Privacy Rule's original, narrow focus on health industry participants and individually identifiable health information compared to the GDPR's broad focus on data controllers and personal data. Other differences ...


Disparities In Private Health Insurance Coverage Of Skilled Care, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2017

Disparities In Private Health Insurance Coverage Of Skilled Care, Stacey A. Tovino

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This article compares and contrasts public and private health insurance coverage of skilled medical rehabilitation, including cognitive rehabilitation, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and skilled nursing services (collectively, skilled care). As background, prior scholars writing in this area have focused on Medicare coverage of skilled care and have challenged coverage determinations limiting Medicare coverage to beneficiaries who are able to demonstrate improvement in their conditions within a specific period of time (the Improvement Standard). By and large, these scholars have applauded the settlement agreement approved on 24 January 2013, by the U.S. District Court for the District of ...


Trial And Error: Legislating Adr For Medical Malpractice Reform, Lydia Nussbaum Jan 2017

Trial And Error: Legislating Adr For Medical Malpractice Reform, Lydia Nussbaum

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The U.S. healthcare system has a problem: hundreds of thousands of people die each year, and over a million are injured, by medical mistakes that could have been avoided. Furthermore, over ninety percent of these patients and their families never learn of the errors or receive redress. This problem persists, despite myriad reforms to the medical malpractice system, because of lawmakers' dominant focus on reducing providers' liability insurance costs. Reform objectives are beginning to change, however, and the vehicle for implementing these changes is alternative dispute resolution ("ADR"). Historically, legislatures deployed ADR to curb malpractice litigation and restrict patients ...


Posthumous Organ Donation As Prisoner Agency And Rehabilitation, Amanda Seals Bersinger, Lisa Milot Jul 2016

Posthumous Organ Donation As Prisoner Agency And Rehabilitation, Amanda Seals Bersinger, Lisa Milot

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Unlike U.S. citizens generally, who are encouraged to become organ donors through drivers' license designations, advance directives, and state registries, in most instances inmates are barred from donating their organs until release.

To date, the scholarship in favor of allowing inmates to donate their organs has largely focused on the benefit these donations could offer patients languishing on organ transplant lists, while objections center on the vulnerability of the imprisoned potential donors and their inability to make decisions freely. A donor-focused case for donation, however, is missing in this debate. This Article fills that gap by setting out the ...


Of Mice And Men: On The Seclusion Of Immigration Detainees And Hospital Patients, Stacey A. Tovino Jun 2016

Of Mice And Men: On The Seclusion Of Immigration Detainees And Hospital Patients, Stacey A. Tovino

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With a special focus on federal provisions strictly regulating Medicare-participating hospitals' use of seclusion, this Article uses developments in health law as a lens through which the uses and abuses of seclusion in immigration detention centers might be assessed and through which the standards governing detention centers might be improved. In particular, this Article argues that the unenforceable standards governing seclusion in immigration detention, including the most recent version of ICE's Performance-Based National Detention Standards, were incorrectly modeled on correctional standards developed for use in jails and prisons with respect to convicted criminals. This Article asserts that correctional standards ...


What Is (And Isn't) Healthism, Jessica L. Roberts, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard Apr 2016

What Is (And Isn't) Healthism, Jessica L. Roberts, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard

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What does it mean to discriminate on the basis of health status? Health is, of course, relevant in a number of ways. It can speak to the length of our lives, our ability to perform mentally and physically, our need for health care, and our risk of injury and incapacity. But the mere relevance of a particular attribute does mean that considering it should be legally permissible. Moreover, the potential harms that may result from health-status discrimination raise important moral questions. This Essay explores when differentiating on the basis of health is socially acceptable and, by contrast, when it is ...


To Accommodate Or Not To Accommodate: (When) Should The State Regulate Religion To Protect The Rights Of Children And Third Parties?, Hillel Y. Levin, Allan J. Jacobs, Kavita Arora Jan 2016

To Accommodate Or Not To Accommodate: (When) Should The State Regulate Religion To Protect The Rights Of Children And Third Parties?, Hillel Y. Levin, Allan J. Jacobs, Kavita Arora

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When should we accommodate religious practices? When should we demand that religious groups instead conform to social and legal norms? Who should make these decisions, and how? These questions lie at the very heart of our contemporary debates in the field of Law and Religion.

Particularly thorny issues arise where religious practices may impose health-related harm to children within a religious group or to third parties. Unfortunately, legislators, scholars, courts, ethicists, and medical practitioners have not offered a consistent way to analyze such cases and the law is inconsistent. This Article suggests that the lack of consistency is a troubling ...


Best Practices For A State Alzheimer's Disease Registry: Lessons From Georgia, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard, Rui Bu, Amanda Alexandra Brown Jan 2016

Best Practices For A State Alzheimer's Disease Registry: Lessons From Georgia, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard, Rui Bu, Amanda Alexandra Brown

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In May 2014, the Georgia General Assembly enacted legislation establishing the Alzheimer’s Disease Registry (“Registry”) in order to generate new data for research and policy planning. The Task Force bill followed similar federal legislation. This state action has not only drawn tremendous attention to the continued prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease among the population of Georgia but also raised a series of questions regarding the practicability, legality, and effectiveness of the Registry. The lessons learned in Georgia, as Registry implementation moves forward, will provide guidance for other states interested in collecting similar data. In Part I of this article ...


The 'Uberization' Of Healthcare: The Forthcoming Legal Storm Over Mobile Health Technology's Impact On The Medical Profession, Fazal Khan Jan 2016

The 'Uberization' Of Healthcare: The Forthcoming Legal Storm Over Mobile Health Technology's Impact On The Medical Profession, Fazal Khan

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The nascent field of mobile health technology is still very small but is predicted to grow exponentially as major technology companies such as Apple, Google, Samsung, and even Facebook have announced mobile health initiatives alongside influential healthcare provider networks. Given the highly regulated nature of healthcare, significant legal barriers stand in the way of mobile health’s potential ascension. I contend that the most difficult legal challenges facing this industry will be restrictive professional licensing and scope of practice laws. The primary reason is that mobile health threatens to disrupt historical power dynamics within the healthcare profession that have legally ...


The Danger Zone: How The Dangerousness Standard In Civil Commitment Proceedings Harms People With Serious Mental Illness, Sara G. Gordon Jan 2016

The Danger Zone: How The Dangerousness Standard In Civil Commitment Proceedings Harms People With Serious Mental Illness, Sara G. Gordon

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Almost every American state allows civil commitment upon a finding that a person, as a result of mental illness, is gravely disabled and unable to meet their basic needs for food and shelter. Yet in spite of these statutes, most psychiatrists and courts will not commit an individual until they are found to pose a danger to themselves or others. All people have certain rights to be free from unwanted medical treatment, but for people with serious mental illness, those civil liberties are an abstraction, safeguarded for them by a system that is not otherwise ensuring access to shelter and ...


Controlling Health Care Spending: More Patient "Skin In The Game?", David Orentlicher Jan 2016

Controlling Health Care Spending: More Patient "Skin In The Game?", David Orentlicher

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In this article, Professor Orentlicher explores the high cost of healthcare and the trend in health insurance to shift the cost of health care to patients in an attempt to influence their behavior and health decisions. He examines such strategies as reference pricing, scaled cost-sharing, and employee wellness programs.


Off-Label Drug Marketing, The First Amendment, And Federalism, David Orentlicher Jan 2016

Off-Label Drug Marketing, The First Amendment, And Federalism, David Orentlicher

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In this article, Professor Orentlicher explores free speech and federalism issues arising from FDA regulation of off-label uses and off-label marketing of drugs. In light of the FDA's desire to respect state government authority, together with other considerations discussed in this article, he argues for the rejection of the analysis of the Caronia court and to give the FDA significant leeway in its regulation of off-label marketing.


Clinical Criteria For Physician Aid In Dying, David Orentlicher Jan 2016

Clinical Criteria For Physician Aid In Dying, David Orentlicher

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More than 20 years ago, even before voters in Oregon had enacted the first aid in dying (AID) statute in the United States, Timothy Quill and colleagues proposed clinical criteria AID. Their proposal was carefully considered and temperate, but there were little data on the practice of AID at the time. (With AID, a physician writes a prescription for life-ending medication for a terminally ill, mentally capacitated adult.) With the passage of time, a substantial body of data on AID has developed from the states of Oregon and Washington. For more than 17 years, physicians in Oregon have been authorized ...


Irresponsibly Taxing Irresponsibility: The Individual Tax Penalty Under The Affordable Care Act, Francine J. Lipman, James Owens Jan 2016

Irresponsibly Taxing Irresponsibility: The Individual Tax Penalty Under The Affordable Care Act, Francine J. Lipman, James Owens

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In recent decades, Congress has used the federal income tax system increasingly to administer and deliver social benefits. This transition is consistent with the evolution of the American welfare system into workfare over the last several decades. As more and more social welfare benefits are conditioned upon work, family composition, and means-tested by income levels, the income tax system where this data is already systematically aggregated, authenticated, and processed has become the go-to administrative agency.

Nevertheless, as the National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson has noted there are “substantial differences between benefits agencies and enforcement agencies in terms of culture, mindset ...