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University of Richmond

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

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Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Blood Bank And Blood Products Manufacturer Liability In Transfusion-Related Aids Cases, Dana J. Finberg Jan 1992

Blood Bank And Blood Products Manufacturer Liability In Transfusion-Related Aids Cases, Dana J. Finberg

University of Richmond Law Review

Can a blood bank or a blood products manufacturer be held liable if a patient contracts AIDS through a transfusion of blood or a blood product? And, if so, should the bank or manufacturer be held liable? As of February 1989, approximately 200 cases touching on this issue were pending in the United States.


A Hospital's Dilemma: The Legal Implications Of Promulgating Guidelines Concerning Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Leonard C. Heath Jr. Jan 1988

A Hospital's Dilemma: The Legal Implications Of Promulgating Guidelines Concerning Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Leonard C. Heath Jr.

University of Richmond Law Review

Fear has struck the workplace. The source of this fear is not lack of job security, inflation, recession or a concern about the United States' trade imbalance. The source of the fear is a disease--Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)-and the virus that causes AIDS, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).


Aids, Health-Care Workers, And Workers' Compensation In Virginia, M. Grey Sweeney Jan 1988

Aids, Health-Care Workers, And Workers' Compensation In Virginia, M. Grey Sweeney

University of Richmond Law Review

The recent explosion of medical malpractice litigation has heralded the era of defensive medicine. Health-care professionals at all levels of the industry have been forced to evaluate both the lawsuit potential as well as the life sustaining potential of every act and treatment.' Since 1981, however, the threat of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has added a third, more threatening, perspective to the way health-care workers must view their actions. The average doctor or nurse must balance not only the medical and legal significance of every action, but must also consider whether an action might result in exposure to AIDS.